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Results: 1 to 10 of 232

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Vascular medicine and cardio-oncology - A new, evolving clinical frontier.
Versmissen J, Power JR, Moslehi J
(2020) Vasc Med 25: 205-207
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cancer Survivors, Cardiology, Heart Diseases, Humans, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Prognosis, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Specialization
Added September 29, 2020
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MeSH Terms
Utilization of Cardiac Surveillance Tests in Survivors of Breast Cancer and Lymphoma After Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy.
Ruddy KJ, Sangaralingham LR, Van Houten H, Nowsheen S, Sandhu N, Moslehi J, Neuman H, Jemal A, Haddad TC, Blaes AH, Villarraga HR, Thompson C, Shah ND, Herrmann J
(2020) Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 13: e005984
MeSH Terms: Administrative Claims, Healthcare, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anthracyclines, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Cancer Survivors, Data Warehousing, Echocardiography, Female, Guideline Adherence, Heart Diseases, Humans, Lymphoma, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Predictive Value of Tests, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2020
BACKGROUND - The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend consideration of the use of echocardiography 6 to 12 months after completion of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in at-risk populations. Assessment of BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) has also been suggested by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Failure Society of America for the identification of Stage A (at risk) heart failure patients. The real-world frequency of the use of these tests in patients after receipt of anthracycline therapy, however, has not been studied previously.
METHODS AND RESULTS - In this retrospective study, using administrative claims data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse, we identified 31 447 breast cancer and lymphoma patients (age ≥18 years) who were treated with an anthracycline in the United States between January 1, 2008 and January 31, 2018. Continuous medical and pharmacy coverage was required for at least 6 months before the initial anthracycline dose and 12 months after the final dose. Only 36.1% of patients had any type of cardiac surveillance (echocardiography, BNP, or cardiac imaging) in the year following completion of anthracycline therapy (29.7% echocardiography). Surveillance rate increased from 37.5% in 2008 to 42.7% in 2018 (25.6% in 2008 to 40.5% echocardiography in 2018). Lymphoma patients had a lower likelihood of any surveillance compared with patients with breast cancer (odds ratio, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.74-0.85]; <0.001). Patients with preexisting diagnoses of coronary artery disease and arrhythmia had the highest likelihood of cardiac surveillance (odds ratio, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.39-1.69] and odds ratio, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.3-1.53]; <0.001 for both), although no single comorbidity was associated with a >50% rate of surveillance.
CONCLUSIONS - The majority of survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who have received anthracycline-based chemotherapy do not undergo cardiac surveillance after treatment, including those with a history of cardiovascular comorbidities, such as heart failure.
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27 MeSH Terms
Surveillance of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia.
Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Li D
(2020) Am J Gastroenterol 115: 641-644
MeSH Terms: Cause of Death, Gastric Mucosa, Global Health, Humans, Morbidity, Patient Selection, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Assessment, Stomach Neoplasms, Survival Rate
Added March 3, 2020
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11 MeSH Terms
Spotlight: Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia.
Shah SC, Gupta S, Li D, Morgan D, Mustafa RA, Gawron AJ
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 704
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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13 MeSH Terms
Histologic Subtyping of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia: Overview and Considerations for Clinical Practice.
Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Mustafa RA, Piazuelo MB
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 745-750
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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9 MeSH Terms
Advancing the Science in Gastric Pre-Neoplasia: Study Design Considerations.
Davitkov P, Altayar O, Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Mustafa RA, Sultan S, Morgan DR
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 751-759
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Humans, Incidence, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Prevalence, Research Design, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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13 MeSH Terms
AGA Technical Review on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia-Epidemiology and Risk Factors.
Altayar O, Davitkov P, Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Morgan DR, Turner K, Mustafa RA
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 732-744.e16
MeSH Terms: Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Added March 3, 2020
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11 MeSH Terms
AGA Technical Review on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia-Natural History and Clinical Outcomes.
Gawron AJ, Shah SC, Altayar O, Davitkov P, Morgan D, Turner K, Mustafa RA
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 705-731.e5
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Disease Progression, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Added March 3, 2020
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14 MeSH Terms
Targeted mobilization of Lrig1 gastric epithelial stem cell populations by a carcinogenic type IV secretion system.
Wroblewski LE, Choi E, Petersen C, Delgado AG, Piazuelo MB, Romero-Gallo J, Lantz TL, Zavros Y, Coffey RJ, Goldenring JR, Zemper AE, Peek RM
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 19652-19658
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gastric Mucosa, Gastritis, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Precancerous Conditions, Primary Cell Culture, Risk Factors, Stem Cells, Stomach, Stomach Neoplasms, Type IV Secretion Systems
Show Abstract · Added September 27, 2019
-induced gastritis is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, a malignancy preceded by a series of well-defined histological stages, including metaplasia. One microbial constituent that augments cancer risk is the type 4 secretion system (T4SS), which translocates the oncoprotein CagA into host cells. Aberrant stem cell activation is linked to carcinogenesis, and Lrig1 (leucine-rich repeats and Ig-like domains 1) marks a distinct population of progenitor cells. We investigated whether microbial effectors with carcinogenic potential influence Lrig1 progenitor cells ex vivo and via lineage expansion within -infected gastric mucosa. Lineage tracing was induced in (Lrig1/YFP) mice that were uninfected or subsequently infected with or an isogenic mutant (nonfunctional T4SS). In contrast to infection with wild-type (WT) for 2 wk, infection for 8 wk resulted in significantly increased inflammation and proliferation in the corpus and antrum compared with uninfected or mice infected with the mutant. WT -infected mice harbored significantly higher numbers of Lrig1/YFP epithelial cells that coexpressed UEA1 (surface cell marker). The number of cells coexpressing intrinsic factor (chief cell marker), YFP (lineage marker), and GSII lectin (spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia marker) were increased only by WT In human samples, Lrig1 expression was significantly increased in lesions with premalignant potential compared with normal mucosa or nonatrophic gastritis. In conclusion, chronic infection stimulates Lrig1-expressing progenitor cells in a -dependent manner, and these reprogrammed cells give rise to a full spectrum of differentiated cells.
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23 MeSH Terms
Nicotinic treatment of post-chemotherapy subjective cognitive impairment: a pilot study.
Vega JN, Albert KM, Mayer IA, Taylor WD, Newhouse PA
(2019) J Cancer Surviv 13: 673-686
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Cancer Survivors, Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Nicotine, Pilot Projects, Quality of Life, Self Report, Survivors, Transdermal Patch
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
PURPOSE - Persistent chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (pCRCI) is commonly reported following cancer treatment and negatively affects quality of life; however, there is currently no pharmacological treatment indicated for pCRCI. This pilot study obtained preliminary data regarding the use of transdermal nicotine patches as a therapeutic strategy for women with pCRCI to (1) reduce subjective cognitive complaints and (2) enhance objective cognitive performance in breast, colon, lymphoma, or ovarian cancer survivors with pCRCI.
METHODS - Participants were randomized to either placebo (n = 11) or transdermal nicotine (n = 11) for 6 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of treatment withdrawal for a total of 8 weeks. Participants were assessed using both subjective and objective measures of cognitive functioning at five visits before, during, and after treatment.
RESULTS - Over the course of the study, women in both groups improved substantially in severity of self-reported cognitive complaints measured by Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function Perceived Cognitive Impairments regardless of treatment arm. Additionally, objective cognitive performance measures improved in both groups; however, there was no significant difference in improvement between groups.
CONCLUSIONS - Due to a large placebo response, we were unable to determine if a drug effect was present. However, we did observe substantial improvement in self-reported cognitive symptoms, likely resulting from factors related to participation in the trial rather than specific drug treatment effects.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - The study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (trial registration: NCT02312943).
IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS - These results suggest that women with pCRCI can exhibit improvement in subjective cognition, with attention paid to symptoms and close follow-up over a short period of time.
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18 MeSH Terms