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Development and Psychometric Properties of the Yoga Self-Efficacy Scale (YSES).
Birdee GS, Sohl SJ, Wallston K
(2016) BMC Complement Altern Med 16: 3
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Psychometrics, Self Efficacy, Self Report, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added February 10, 2016
BACKGROUND - Yoga is a behavioral practice that uses physical movement, breathing, and meditation to improve health and promote personal transformation. Ancient yoga philosophy proposed that an individual's confidence about yoga, a concept similar to self-efficacy, will affect the likelihood of improved health from yoga practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of a self-efficacy measure for yoga practice (the Yoga Self-Efficacy Scale; YSES).
METHODS - Yoga practitioners were recruited to evaluate the psychometric properties of YSES via a secure online survey. We collected data on additional measures to further examine construct validity. After two weeks, participants were invited to complete YSES items again to assess test-retest reliability.
RESULTS - A majority of participants (N = 309) were White (85%), female (82%), and yoga instructors (56%). The 12-item YSES is unidimensional with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93. Test-retest reliability is r = 0.79 (n = 170). YSES scores are positively correlated with health competence, health-related quality of life, and years practicing yoga, supporting construct validity. Also, yoga teachers scored significantly higher on the YSES than non-teachers (p < 0.001). Non-significant relationships with education, income and sex supported discriminant validity. YSES maintained internal consistency and construct validity for all yoga styles surveyed.
CONCLUSION - YSES is a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy for yoga practice that may provide insight into barriers to adopting and maintaining yoga as a health behavior.
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8 MeSH Terms
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Women During Pregnancy and Childbearing Years.
Holden SC, Gardiner P, Birdee G, Davis RB, Yeh GY
(2015) Birth 42: 261-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Back Pain, Complementary Therapies, Female, Health Behavior, Health Status, Health Surveys, Humans, Middle Aged, Plants, Medicinal, Pregnancy, Socioeconomic Factors, United States, Yoga, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 10, 2016
OBJECTIVES - Little is known regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use during pregnancy and the preconception period. Since half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended, understanding the patterns of CAM use among women of childbearing age has implications for fetal and maternal health.
METHODS - Descriptive statistics were generated from the 2012 National Health Interview Study (NHIS) to estimate weighted prevalence and patterns of CAM use by women of childbearing age. Comparisons were made between pregnant and nonpregnant respondents.
RESULTS - In this sample of 10,002 women, 7 percent (n = 727) were recently pregnant. Over one-third of all the women used CAM during the previous year (34/38%, pregnant/nonpregnant, respectively) and only half disclosed CAM use to conventional providers (50/49%). In the adjusted model, taking multivitamins (OR 2.52 [CI 2.22-2.86]) and moderate to heavy alcohol use (OR 1.92 [CI 1.53-2.41]) were more likely associated with CAM use. The two most commonly used modalities were herbs (14/17%) and yoga (13/16%). The top reasons for CAM use were to improve general wellness or to prevent disease (33/35%) and to treat back pain (16/18%). When examining all pregnancy-related symptoms treated with CAM, no difference was found in the rates of CAM use between pregnant and nonpregnant users.
CONCLUSIONS - CAM use by women of childbearing age in the United States is common, with over a third of the population using one or more therapies. However, only half disclosed their use to conventional providers despite limited evidence on safety and effectiveness. This study highlights the important need for further research in this area.
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Feasibility and Safety of Intradialysis Yoga and Education in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.
Birdee GS, Rothman RL, Sohl SJ, Wertenbaker D, Wheeler A, Bossart C, Balasire O, Ikizler TA
(2015) J Ren Nutr 25: 445-53
MeSH Terms: Adult, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Feasibility Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Compliance, Patient Education as Topic, Pilot Projects, Quality of Life, Renal Dialysis, Sedentary Behavior, Surveys and Questionnaires, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added May 17, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis are much more sedentary than healthy individuals. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of a 12-week intradialysis yoga intervention versus a kidney education intervention on the promotion of physical activity.
DESIGN AND METHODS - We randomized participants by dialysis shift to either 12-week intradialysis yoga or an educational intervention. Intradialysis yoga was provided by yoga teachers to participants while receiving hemodialysis. Participants receiving the 12-week educational intervention received a modification of a previously developed comprehensive educational program for patients with kidney disease (Kidney School). The primary outcome for this study was feasibility based on recruitment and adherence to the interventions and safety of intradialysis yoga. Secondary outcomes were to determine the feasibility of administering questionnaires at baseline and 12 weeks including the Kidney Disease-Related Quality of Life-36.
RESULTS - Among 56 eligible patients who approached for the study, 31 (55%) were interested and consented to participation, with 18 assigned to intradialysis yoga and 13 to the educational program. A total of 5 participants withdrew from the pilot study, all from the intradialysis yoga group. Two of these participants reported no further interest in participation. Three withdrawn participants switched dialysis times and therefore could no longer receive intradialysis yoga. As a result, 13 of 18 (72%) and 13 of 13 (100%) participants completed 12-week intradialysis yoga and educational programs, respectively. There were no adverse events related to intradialysis yoga. Intervention participants practiced yoga for a median of 21 sessions (70% participation frequency), with 60% of participants practicing at least 2 times a week. Participants in the educational program completed a median of 30 sessions (83% participation frequency). Of participants who completed the study (n = 26), baseline and 12-week questionnaires were obtained from 85%.
CONCLUSIONS - Our pilot study of 12-week intradialysis yoga and 12-week educational intervention reached recruitment goals but with less than targeted completion and adherence to intervention rates. This study provided valuable feasibility data to increase follow-up and adherence for future clinical trials to compare efficacy.
Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Feasibility of a brief yoga intervention during chemotherapy for persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer.
Sohl SJ, Danhauer SC, Schnur JB, Daly L, Suslov K, Montgomery GH
(2012) Explore (NY) 8: 197-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Anxiety, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Ovarian Neoplasms, Relaxation, Yoga
Added March 5, 2014
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8 MeSH Terms
Development of the beliefs about yoga scale.
Sohl SJ, Schnur JB, Daly L, Suslov K, Montgomery GH
(2011) Int J Yoga Therap : 85-91
MeSH Terms: Adult, Culture, Female, Humans, Male, Psychometrics, Reproducibility of Results, Surveys and Questionnaires, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Beliefs about yoga may influence participation in yoga and outcomes of yoga interventions. There is currently no scale appropriate for assessing these beliefs in the general U.S. population. This study took the first steps in developing and validating a Beliefs About Yoga Scale (BAYS) to assess beliefs about yoga that may influence people's engagement in yoga interventions. Items were generated based on previously published research about perceptions of yoga and reviewed by experts within the psychology and yoga communities. 426 adult participants were recruited from an urban medical center to respond to these items. The mean age was 40.7 (SD=13.5) years. Participants completed the BAYS and seven additional indicators of criterion-related validity. The BAYS demonstrated internal consistency (11 items; α=0.76) and three factors emerged: expected health benefits, expected discomfort, and expected social norms. The factor structure was confirmed: x2 (41, n=213)=72.06, p<.001; RMSEA=06, p=.23. Criterion-related validity was supported by positive associations of the BAYS with past experiences and future intentions related to yoga. This initial analysis of the BAYS demonstrated that it is an adequately reliable and valid measure of beliefs about yoga with a three-factor structure. However, the scale may need to be modified based on the population to which it is applied.
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9 MeSH Terms
T'ai chi and qigong for health: patterns of use in the United States.
Birdee GS, Wayne PM, Davis RB, Phillips RS, Yeh GY
(2009) J Altern Complement Med 15: 969-73
MeSH Terms: Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Asthma, Breathing Exercises, Cross-Sectional Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Health Behavior, Humans, Mind-Body Therapies, Musculoskeletal Diseases, Social Class, Sprains and Strains, Tai Ji, United States, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
BACKGROUND - Little is known in the United States about those who practice t'ai chi and qigong, two mind-body techniques that originated in Asia.
OBJECTIVE - The objective of this study is to characterize use of t'ai chi and qigong for health with regard to sociodemographics, health status, medical conditions, perceptions of helpfulness, and disclosure of use to medical professionals.
METHODS - We analyzed associations of t'ai chi and qigong use for health using cross-sectional data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Alternative Medicine Supplement (n = 31,044). The 2002 NHIS estimated the number of t'ai chi and qigong users for health to be 2.5 and 0.5 million persons, respectively. We collapsed t'ai chi and qigong use into a single category (TCQ) for analysis, representing 2.8 million individuals.
RESULTS - We found that neither age nor sex was associated with TCQ use. TCQ users were more likely than nonusers to be Asian than white (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-3.15), college educated (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.97-3.03), and less likely to live in the Midwest (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-0.96) or the southern United States (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.72) than the West. TCQ use was associated independently with higher reports of musculoskeletal conditions (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.83), severe sprains (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.14-2.40), and asthma (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.08-2.10). Half of TCQ users also used yoga for health in the last 12 months. Most TCQ users reported their practice to be important to maintain health, but only a quarter of users disclosed their practice to a medical professional.
CONCLUSIONS - In the United States, TCQ is practiced for health by a diverse population, and users report benefits for maintaining health. Further research is needed to establish efficacy and safety for target populations, including those with musculoskeletal and pulmonary disease, as well as for preventive health.
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14 MeSH Terms
Clinical applications of yoga for the pediatric population: a systematic review.
Birdee GS, Yeh GY, Wayne PM, Phillips RS, Davis RB, Gardiner P
(2009) Acad Pediatr 9: 212-220.e1-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Child Behavior Disorders, Complementary Therapies, Developmental Disabilities, Female, Humans, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Male, Pediatrics, Prognosis, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Treatment Outcome, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
OBJECTIVE - The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for clinical applications of yoga among the pediatric population.
METHODS - We conducted an electronic literature search including CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO, and manual search of retrieved articles from inception of each database until December 2008. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs) were selected that included yoga or yoga-based interventions for individuals aged 0 to 21 years. Data were extracted and articles critically reviewed using a modified Jadad score and descriptive methodological criteria, with summarization in tables.
RESULTS - Thirty-four controlled studies published from 1979 to 2008 were identified, with 19 RCTS and 15 NRCTs. Many studies were of low methodological quality. Clinical areas for which yoga has been studied include physical fitness, cardiorespiratory effects, motor skills/strength, mental health and psychological disorders, behavior and development, irritable bowel syndrome, and birth outcomes following prenatal yoga. No adverse events were reported in trials reviewed. Although a large majority of studies were positive, methodological limitations such as randomization methods, withdrawal/dropouts, and details of yoga intervention preclude conclusive evidence.
CONCLUSIONS - There are limited data on the clinical applications of yoga among the pediatric population. Most published controlled trials were suggestive of benefit, but results are preliminary based on low quantity and quality of trials. Further research of yoga for children by using a higher standard of methodology and reporting is warranted.
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15 MeSH Terms
Characteristics of yoga users: results of a national survey.
Birdee GS, Legedza AT, Saper RB, Bertisch SM, Eisenberg DM, Phillips RS
(2008) J Gen Intern Med 23: 1653-8
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Complementary Therapies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Behavior, Health Surveys, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, United States, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
BACKGROUND - There are limited data on the characteristics of yoga users in the U.S.
OBJECTIVE - To characterize yoga users, medical reasons for use, perceptions of helpfulness, and disclosure of use to medical professionals.
METHODS - Utilizing cross-sectional survey data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Alternative Medicine Supplement (n = 31044), we examined correlates of yoga use for health. The estimated prevalence from 2002 NHIS of yoga for health was 5.1% corresponding to over 10 million adults.
RESULTS - In 2002, yoga users were predominately Caucasian (85%) and female (76%) with a mean age of 39.5 years. Compared to non-yoga users, yoga users were more likely female (OR 3.76, 95% CI 3.11-4.33); less likely black than white (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.53-0.80); tended to be younger; and more likely college educated (OR 2.70, 95% CI 2.37-3.08). Musculoskeletal conditions (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.42-1.83), mental health conditions (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22-1.67), severe sprains in the last 12 months (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.81), and asthma (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05-1.54) were independently associated with higher yoga use, while hypertension (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.95) and chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.48-1.00) were associated with lower use. Yoga was most commonly used to treat musculoskeletal or mental health conditions, and most users reported yoga to be helpful for these conditions. A majority of yoga users (61%) felt yoga was important in maintaining health, though only 25% disclosed yoga practice to their medical professional.
CONCLUSIONS - We found that yoga users are more likely to be white, female, young and college educated. Yoga users report benefit for musculoskeletal conditions and mental health, indicating that further research on the efficacy of yoga for the treatment and/or prevention of these conditions is warranted.
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13 MeSH Terms