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Concordance between physiological arousal and subjective distress among Vietnam combat veterans undergoing challenge testing for PTSD.
Marx BP, Bovin MJ, Suvak MK, Monson CM, Sloan DM, Fredman SJ, Humphreys KL, Kaloupek DG, Keane TM
(2012) J Trauma Stress 25: 416-25
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analysis of Variance, Antisocial Personality Disorder, Arousal, Depressive Disorder, Major, Galvanic Skin Response, Heart Rate, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Self Report, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Stress, Psychological, Substance-Related Disorders, Veterans, Vietnam Conflict, Warfare
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
This study examined concordance between physiological arousal and subjective distress during a laboratory challenge task. Data were collected during the multisite VA Cooperative Study 334 in the early 1990s examining psychophysiological arousal among combat-exposed Vietnam veterans with (n = 775) and without (n = 369) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study participants were presented with 6 standardized neutral scenes and 6 standardized combat scenes. Participants provided a subjective rating of distress after each slide. During the presentation, levels of heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) were recorded. Using linear mixed effects modeling, both HR level and SC level exhibited significant positive associations with subjective distress ratings (pr = .33, p < .001 and pr = .19, p < .001, respectively). Individuals with PTSD demonstrated greater concordance between their distress ratings and SC level during exposure to combat slides than participants without PTSD (pr = .28, p < .001 vs. pr = .18, p < .001). Although a significant association was found between subjective distress and HR reactivity and SC reactivity, these findings were not moderated by PTSD status. The results of these analyses suggest that patients' reports of distress during exposure-based treatments might serve as approximate measures of actual physiological arousal.
Copyright © 2012 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Impact of war on the household environment and domestic activities: vital lessons from the civil war in Lebanon.
Acra SA
(2006) J Public Health Policy 27: 136-45
MeSH Terms: Family Characteristics, Humans, Lebanon, Quality of Life, Warfare
Added October 8, 2015
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
Health-related outcomes of war in Nicaragua.
Garfield RM, Frieden T, Vermund SH
(1987) Am J Public Health 77: 615-8
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Health Services, Humans, Infant, Infant Mortality, Infant, Newborn, Morbidity, Mortality, Nicaragua, Warfare, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Since 1983, war in Nicaragua has slowed improvements in health which had developed rapidly from 1979-82. The rate of war-related deaths among Nicaraguans now exceeds that of the United States citizens in either the Vietnam War or World War II. Forty-two of the 84 documented war-related casualties among Nicaraguan health workers have been deaths. This high case fatality rate reflects the targeting of health workers by contra troops. The number of staff and services of the public medical system decreased by approximately 10 per cent from 1983 to 1985. Population movements, the establishment of new settlements, and war-related destruction of the primary health infrastructure are associated with recent epidemics of malaria, dengue, measles, and leishmaniasis. The estimated rate of infant mortality in Nicaragua, which had declined from 120 per 1,000 in 1978 to 76/1,000 live births in 1983, has since shown no further decline. Internationally mandated protections enjoyed by civilians and health workers during times of war do not appear to operate in this so-called "low intensity" conflict. Further declines in infant mortality, prevention of epidemics, and improvement in other health indicators will likely await the cessation of military hostilities.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Smallpox and biological warfare: the case for abandoning vaccination of military personnel.
Capps L, Vermund SH, Johnsen C
(1986) Am J Public Health 76: 1229-31
MeSH Terms: Biological Warfare, Humans, International Cooperation, Military Medicine, Military Personnel, Russia, Smallpox, Smallpox Vaccine, United States, Vaccination, World Health Organization
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Smallpox was officially declared eradicated from the world in 1980. Earlier, in 1972, over 50 nations signed the Biological Weapons Convention renouncing this entire category of weapons. Despite this international agreement, both the United States and the Soviet Union continue to vaccinate their military troops against smallpox, thus implying that each fears the other might still use it in biological warfare. Vaccination is not a harmless procedure, and vaccinia infections continue to be reported in troops and their contacts. Negotiating an end to the vaccination of troops would be a final step in ending the fear of smallpox.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Malaria in Nicaragua: community-based control efforts and the impact of war.
Garfield RM, Prado E, Gates JR, Vermund SH
(1989) Int J Epidemiol 18: 434-9
MeSH Terms: Humans, Malaria, Nicaragua, Warfare
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
This descriptive study of temporal trends and geographical distribution examines the effects of prolonged low-intensity warfare on the community-based malaria control efforts. Nicaragua's post-1979 malaria control programme is based on community participation in health education and in mosquito breeding site drainage, expanded case finding, and increased availability of chemotherapy. Mosquito resistance and increasing costs have forced a reduction in the use of residual pesticides. The number of reported malaria cases in the country fell from 25,465 in 1980 to 15,702 in 1984, while the ratio of blood smears to total population increased from 86 to 137 per 1000 people. Malaria incidence in the eight states of the country under heaviest military attack in the current war was compared to incidence in the eight states least affected by the war. In the war zone there was a 17% excess in cases from August 1983-April 1985 above a 1974-82 baseline average, while there was a 62% decline in the number of cases in the non-war zone.
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1 Members
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4 MeSH Terms