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Low holo-transcobalamin levels are prevalent in vegetarians and is associated with coronary artery disease in Indian population.
Basak T, Garg G, Bhardwaj N, Tanwar VS, Seth S, Karthikeyan G, Sengupta S
(2016) Biomarkers 21: 436-40
MeSH Terms: Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, Coronary Artery Disease, Humans, India, Prevalence, Transcobalamins, Vegetarians, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing alarmingly in India. We had earlier shown that vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with CAD in Indian population. However, only about a quarter of the total vitamin B12 is internalised in the cells by the proteins transcobalamin II. Vitamin B12-bound transcobalamin II (holotranscobalamin, holoTC) is thus referred to as biologically active B12. In this study, we ascertained the levels of holoTC in 501 CAD cases and 1253 healthy controls and for the first time show that holoTC levels are significantly lower (p = 2.57E-4) in CAD (26.81 pmol/l) cases as compared to controls (29.97 pmol/l).
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9 MeSH Terms
Homocysteine metabolism in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
Kundal M, Saha A, Dubey NK, Kapoor K, Basak T, Bhardwaj G, Tanwar VS, Sengupta S, Batra V, Upadhayay AD, Bhatt A
(2014) Clin Transl Sci 7: 132-6
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Child, Cholesterol, Cysteine, Demography, Female, Folic Acid, Homocysteine, Humans, Male, Nephrotic Syndrome, Proteinuria, Remission Induction, Serum Albumin, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
BACKGROUND - Homocysteine metabolism is altered in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor of early atherosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis and may occur at time of first occurrence of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
METHODS - Thirty children with first episode of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (FENS) aged 1-16 years along with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Homocysteine and cysteine were measured with HPLC; vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured with electro-chemilumiscence immunoassay. Primary outcome measure was plasma homocysteine level in children with FENS and in controls. Secondary outcome measures were (1) plasma and urine homocysteine and cysteine levels in children with FENS at 12 weeks and 1 year (remission) and (2) plasma and urine levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid in children with FENS, at 12 weeks and 1 year (remission).
RESULTS - Plasma homocysteine and cysteine levels were comparable to controls in children with FENS, at 12 weeks and 1-year remission. Plasma levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were significantly decreased compared to controls in FENS due to increased urinary excretion, which normalize during remission at 12 weeks and 1 year. Urinary homocysteine and cysteine levels were significantly raised in FENS compared to controls and continued to be raised even at 12-week and 1-year remission.
CONCLUSION - Homocysteine metabolism is deranged in children with FENS. Renal effects of long-term raised urinary homocysteine levels need to be studied.
© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
PPAR signaling pathway is a key modulator of liver proteome in pups born to vitamin B(12) deficient rats.
Ahmad S, Kumar KA, Basak T, Bhardwaj G, Yadav DK, Lalitha A, Chandak GR, Raghunath M, Sengupta S
(2013) J Proteomics 91: 297-308
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Carbohydrates, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Lipids, Liver, Maternal Exposure, Micronutrients, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors, Pregnancy, Proteome, Proteomics, Rats, Signal Transduction, Vitamin B 12, Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
UNLABELLED - Maternal nutritional deficiency in-utero is known to predict risk of complex disorders like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and many neurological disorders in the offspring and vitamin B12 is one such critical micronutrient. Here we performed 2D-DIGE followed by MALDI TOF/TOF analysis to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in liver of pups born to mothers fed vitamin B12 deficient diet vis-à-vis control diet. To further establish causality, we analyzed the effect of B12 rehabilitation at parturition on the protein levels and the phenotype in pups. We identified 38 differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in pathways involved in the regulation of amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Further, three enzymes in the β-oxidation pathway (hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, medium-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase) were down-regulated in pups born to mothers fed vitamin B12 deficient diet. We observed age-dependent differential expression of peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor (PPAR) α and γ in the deficient pups. Interestingly, expression of 27 proteins that were differentially expressed was restored to the control levels after rehabilitation of female rats with vitamin B12 from parturition. Our study thus provides the first evidence that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency influences lipid and other micronutrient metabolism in pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway.
BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE - Maternal vitamin B12 deficiency has been shown to predict the onset of complex disorders like atherosclerosis, type II diabetes etc. in the next generation during their adulthood. We have shown earlier that pups born to female rats fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet were obese and developed high levels of other intermediate traits such as triglycerides, cholesterol etc. that are related to the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. In this piece of work using differential proteomic approach we have identified the altered metabolic processes in the liver of vitamin B12 deficient pups. We have also documented that the proteins involved in β-oxidation pathway are down-regulated. Further, differential expression of PPARα and PPARγ was evidently documented as the master regulator for the alteration of lipid, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism during maternal vitamin B12 deficiency.
© 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Polymorphisms in transcobalamin II gene is associated with coronary artery disease in Indian population.
Garg G, Kumar J, Tanwar VS, Basak T, Seth S, Karthikeyan G, Sengupta S
(2012) Biomarkers 17: 119-24
MeSH Terms: Adult, Alleles, Case-Control Studies, Coronary Artery Disease, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genotype, Humans, India, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Regression Analysis, Transcobalamins, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
Transcobalamin (TCII) is a key enzyme involved in intracellular transport of vitamin B12. We had earlier shown that vitamin B12 levels are associated with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Herein, we evaluated the association of four nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TCII gene with CAD in 1398 individuals (589 CAD cases and 809 controls). Using logistic regression, we found that three SNPs (G1196A, C776G and C1043T) were significantly associated with CAD and one (G1196A) with vitamin B12 levels even after controlling for confounding factors. Thus, polymorphisms in TCII gene may play an important role in the etiology of CAD.
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16 MeSH Terms
Dietary B vitamin and methionine intakes and plasma folate are not associated with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese women.
Shrubsole MJ, Yang G, Gao YT, Chow WH, Shu XO, Cai Q, Rothman N, Gao J, Wagner C, Zheng W
(2009) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18: 1003-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Case-Control Studies, China, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Female, Folic Acid, Humans, Logistic Models, Methionine, Middle Aged, Niacinamide, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Registries, Riboflavin, Risk, Surveys and Questionnaires, Vitamin B 12, Vitamin B 6
Added March 18, 2014
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21 MeSH Terms
Relationship between plasma S-adenosylhomocysteine concentration and glomerular filtration rate in children.
Jabs K, Koury MJ, Dupont WD, Wagner C
(2006) Metabolism 55: 252-7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Congenital Hypothyroidism, Folic Acid, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Homocysteine, Humans, Infant, Kidney Diseases, S-Adenosylhomocysteine, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2013
S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is the metabolic precursor of all the homocysteine (Hcy) produced in the body. It is formed by the enzyme SAH hydrolase in a reversible reaction. In a previous study we have shown that plasma SAH is a more sensitive indicator of the risk for cardiovascular disease, and in a second study involving patients with renal disease, we also showed that it is a more sensitive indicator of renal insufficiency than plasma Hcy. However, in the latter study, the patients with renal disease were older and had a variety of other diseases such as diabetes and primary hypertension, which are associated with vascular disease and which could reduce renal function by involvement of the kidneys. Our objective was to rule out these complicating factors as the cause of the elevated SAH in renal disease and determine whether renal insufficiency alone was the cause of the elevated SAH. We therefore measured SAH, Hcy, folate, and vitamin B12 in 23 patients between the ages of 1 and 18 years with a wide range of renal function, but who had none of these complicating factors. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using serum creatinine according to the Schwartz formula. None of the children were deficient in folate or vitamin B12. After adjusting for age, folate, and vitamin B12, there was a modest and insignificant decrease of 0.033 micromol/L of Hcy associated with an increase of 1 mL/min of GFR (95% confidence interval, -0.066 to 0.0002). However, there was a strong and statistically significant association between log(SAH) and log(GFR): P < .0005, R2 = 0.76. This result suggests that plasma SAH rather than Hcy is the metabolite primarily affected in renal disease. We suggest that plasma Hcy elevations that have been linked to vascular disease may be due to elevated SAH resulting from renal insufficiency.
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12 MeSH Terms
Creatine metabolism in combined methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria.
Bodamer OA, Sahoo T, Beaudet AL, O'Brien WE, Bottiglieri T, Stöckler-Ipsiroglu S, Wagner C, Scaglia F
(2005) Ann Neurol 57: 557-60
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors, Child, Child, Preschool, Creatine, Female, Glycine, Homocysteine, Homocystinuria, Humans, Male, Methionine, Methylmalonic Acid, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Methylation is an important aspect of many fundamental biological processes including creatine biosynthesis. We studied five patients with an inborn error of cobalamin metabolism to characterize the relation between homocysteine and creatine metabolism. Plasma guanidinoacetate concentrations were increased, 14.9 +/- 4.8 micromol/L (p < 0.0001), whereas plasma creatine concentrations were in the low reference range, 43.8 +/- 20.7 micromol/L (p = not significant). Individuals with combined methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria have a functional impairment of the creatine synthetic pathway probably secondary to a relative depletion of labile methyl groups. The neurotoxic effects of guanidinoacetate may be partly responsible for the observed neurological phenotype.
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14 MeSH Terms
Plasma S-adenosylhomocysteine is a more sensitive indicator of cardiovascular disease than plasma homocysteine.
Kerins DM, Koury MJ, Capdevila A, Rana S, Wagner C
(2001) Am J Clin Nutr 74: 723-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Case-Control Studies, Creatinine, Female, Folic Acid, Homocysteine, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, S-Adenosylhomocysteine, S-Adenosylmethionine, Sensitivity and Specificity, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Although plasma total homocysteine has been identified as an independent risk factor for vascular disease in a multitude of studies, there is a considerable overlap in values between patients at risk and control subjects. The difference in values can be used to distinguish statistically between the 2 groups, provided each group is large enough; however, discriminating between individual patients at risk and control subjects is difficult.
OBJECTIVE - We investigated whether the precursor of homocysteine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, is a more sensitive indicator of risk.
DESIGN - We measured plasma total homocysteine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, S-adenosylmethionine, creatinine, folate, and vitamin B-12 in 30 patients with proven cardiovascular disease and 29 age- and sex-matched control subjects.
RESULTS - The homocysteine values (+/-SD) were 12.8 +/- 4.9 (95% CI: 11.0, 14.7) micromol/L for patients and 11.0 +/- 3.2 (9.8, 12.2) micromol/L for control subjects. The S-adenosylhomocysteine values were 40.0 +/- 20.6 (32.3, 47.7) nmol/L for patients and 27.0 +/- 6.7 (24.5, 30.0) nmol/L for control subjects (P = 0.0021). The S-adenosylmethionine values were 121.8 +/- 42.9 (105.8, 137.8) nmol/L for patients and 103.9 +/- 21.8 (95.6, 112.2) nmol/L for control subjects (P = 0.0493). The creatinine values were 110 +/- 27 (97, 120) micromol/L for patients and 97 +/- 9 (80, 100) micromol/L for control subjects (P = 0.0025). Values for folate and vitamin B-12 did not differ significantly between groups.
CONCLUSIONS - Plasma S-adenosylhomocysteine appears to be a much more sensitive indicator of the difference between patients with cardiovascular disease and control subjects than is homocysteine. Both plasma total homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine are significantly correlated with plasma creatinine in patients.
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16 MeSH Terms
Glucose-induced increase in paracellular permeability and disruption of beta-receptor signaling in retinal endothelium.
Haselton FR, Dworska EJ, Hoffman LH
(1998) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 39: 1676-84
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic beta-Agonists, Animals, Capillary Permeability, Cattle, Cells, Cultured, Endothelium, Vascular, Fluorescein, Glucose, Isoproterenol, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta, Retinal Vessels, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
PURPOSE - To examine the effects of high glucose concentrations on retinal endothelial permeability in an in vitro model of the retinal microvasculature.
METHODS - The permeability of the endothelial barrier to small solutes was measured in a chromatographic cell column consisting of bovine retinal endothelial cells cultured on porous fibronectin-coated microcarriers. In each cell column, permeability changes were evaluated by comparing the treatment permeability response over time with the initial baseline permeability. Short-term (2-hour) barrier effects of glucose were examined by measuring permeability at 15-minute intervals after an increase in perfusate concentration from baseline (5.5 mM) to high (25 mM) glucose. Long-term (to 57 days) effects were tested by addition of 25 mM glucose to microcarrier cultures. The effect of glucose on beta-receptor signaling was tested by measuring its effect on the permeability decrease produced by 1 microM isoproterenol.
RESULTS - An increase from 5.5 mM to 25 mM glucose concentration did not change retinal endothelial cell monolayer permeability (n=6) during 2 hours. However, an increase in monolayer permeability was observed after 19 days (n=8) in the 25-mM glucose culture. Paralleling this time course, short-term exposure to 25 mM glucose did not prevent a decrease in permeability triggered by the beta-receptor agonist isoproterenol. However, the permeability effect of the agonist was blocked by long-term culture in 25 mM glucose. Permeability of retinal endothelial monolayers cultured in 5.5 mM glucose and treated with 1 microM isoproterenol decreased significantly to 0.71+/-0.06 of baseline (n=4; mean+/-SEM). However, permeability did not change in parallel cell columns made from microcarriers cultured in 25 mM glucose (0.97+/-0.2 of baseline permeability; n=4; mean+/-SEM).
CONCLUSIONS - High-glucose culture decreases the retinal endothelial barrier and blocks the response to beta-adrenergic receptors. This model may prove valuable in exploring other hypotheses of increased permeability associated with diabetic retinopathy or other retinal diseases that break down the retinal vascular barrier.
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13 MeSH Terms
Modulation of retinal endothelial barrier in an in vitro model of the retinal microvasculature.
Haselton FR, Dworska E, Evans SS, Hoffman LH, Alexander JS
(1996) Exp Eye Res 63: 211-22
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood-Retinal Barrier, Capillaries, Capillary Permeability, Cattle, Cells, Cultured, Cytochalasin D, Endothelium, Vascular, Fluorescein, Fluoresceins, Indicator Dilution Techniques, Isoproterenol, Microspheres, Models, Biological, Molecular Weight, Retinal Vessels, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
The prediabetic/diabetic condition functionally alters the microvascular bed of the eye and the breakdown in the transvascular barrier may be produced by changes in the retinal endothelial barrier. To better understand how retinal microvessel barrier is maintained and is altered in vivo this study applies and extends our previously described in vitro permeability technique to study retinal endothelial monolayers. The model of the retinal microvasculature consists of retinal capillary endothelial cells cultured on porous microcarrier beads and perfused in chromatographic 'cell-columns'. This model design relies on indicator-dilution techniques to measure the permeability of the retinal endothelial monolayer and detects small changes in retinal endothelial permeability produced by treatments. Bovine retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCE) were obtained using an endothelial selective media. RCE were seeded at 3 x 10(4) cells cm-2 of fibronectin-coated gelatin microcarriers. After 7 days of microcarrier culture, microcarriers were poured to form columns 0.66 cm in diameter and 1.6 cm in length. The cell-column elution patterns of coinjected optically absorbing tracers (blue dextran 2 x 10(6) Da; cyanocobalamin 1355 Da; sodium fluorescein 376 Da) were analysed to estimate the permeability of the RCE monolayers covering the microcarriers. Scanning electron microscopic examination showed complete monolayer formation on the surface of the microcarriers. We found that baseline monolayer permeability averaged 7.57 +/- 0.57 x 10(-5) cm sec-1 for cyanocobalamin and 9.29 +/- 0.78 x 10(-5) cm sec-1 for sodium fluorescein (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 39). Permeability did not increase over 2 hr of cell-column perfusion. Permeability was decreased by 1 micron isoproterenol (n = 3) and increased by 1 microgram ml-1 cytochalasin D (n = 5). This is one of the first reports of in vitro permeability values for the transport barrier formed by retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, the endothelial component of the retinal barrier is dynamic, and is enhanced by isoproterenol and diminished by cytochalasin D.
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17 MeSH Terms