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Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.
Denlinger CS, Sanft T, Baker KS, Broderick G, Demark-Wahnefried W, Friedman DL, Goldman M, Hudson M, Khakpour N, King A, Koura D, Lally RM, Langbaum TS, McDonough AL, Melisko M, Montoya JG, Mooney K, Moslehi JJ, O'Connor T, Overholser L, Paskett ED, Peppercorn J, Pirl W, Rodriguez MA, Ruddy KJ, Silverman P, Smith S, Syrjala KL, Tevaarwerk A, Urba SG, Wakabayashi MT, Zee P, McMillian NR, Freedman-Cass DA
(2018) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 16: 1216-1247
MeSH Terms: Anthracyclines, Antibiotics, Antineoplastic, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Bacterial Infections, Cancer Survivors, Cardiotoxicity, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Lymphedema, Mass Screening, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Risk Assessment, Societies, Medical, Survivorship, United States, Vaccination, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2018
The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to help healthcare professionals who work with survivors of adult-onset cancer in the posttreatment period. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding the management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and lymphedema. In addition, recommendations regarding immunizations and the prevention of infections in cancer survivors are included.
Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
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18 MeSH Terms
Severe Delayed Drug Reactions: Role of Genetics and Viral Infections.
Pavlos R, White KD, Wanjalla C, Mallal SA, Phillips EJ
(2017) Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 37: 785-815
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Autoantigens, Cross Reactions, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, HLA Antigens, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Polymorphism, Genetic, Risk, T-Lymphocytes, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant source of patient morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden to health care systems and drug development. Up to 50% of such reactions are preventable. Although many ADRs can be predicted based on the on-target pharmacologic activity, ADRs arising from drug interactions with off-target receptors are recognized. Off-target ADRs include the immune-mediated ADRs (IM-ADRs) and pharmacologic drug effects. In this review, we discuss what is known about the immunogenetics and pathogenesis of IM-ADRs and the hypothesized role of heterologous immunity in the development of IM-ADRs.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Principles of Broad and Potent Antiviral Human Antibodies: Insights for Vaccine Design.
Crowe JE
(2017) Cell Host Microbe 22: 193-206
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antigens, Viral, Antiviral Agents, Cross Reactions, Drug Design, Genes, Reporter, Humans, Immunity, Models, Molecular, Neutralization Tests, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Vaccination, Vaccines, Viral Envelope Proteins, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Antibodies are the principal immune effectors that mediate protection against reinfection following viral infection or vaccination. Robust techniques for human mAb isolation have been developed in the last decade. The study of human mAbs isolated from subjects with prior immunity has become a mainstay for rational structure-based, next-generation vaccine development. The plethora of detailed molecular and genetic studies coupling the structure of antigen-antibody complexes with their antiviral function has begun to reveal common principles of critical interactions on which we can build better vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. This review outlines the approaches to isolating and studying human antiviral mAbs and discusses the common principles underlying the basis for their activity. This review also examines progress toward the goal of achieving a comprehensive understanding of the chemical and physical basis for molecular recognition of viral surface proteins in order to build predictive molecular models that can be used for vaccine design.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
The Molecular Basis for the Lack of Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Differentiated Cells.
D'Angelo W, Gurung C, Acharya D, Chen B, Ortolano N, Gama V, Bai F, Guo YL
(2017) J Immunol 198: 2147-2155
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Chikungunya Fever, Chikungunya virus, Embryonic Stem Cells, Immunity, Inflammation, Interferons, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, NF-kappa B, RAW 264.7 Cells, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2017
We reported previously that mouse embryonic stem cells do not have a functional IFN-based antiviral mechanism. The current study extends our investigation to the inflammatory response in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cell-differentiated cells. We demonstrate that LPS, TNF-α, and viral infection, all of which induce robust inflammatory responses in naturally differentiated cells, failed to activate NF-κB, the key transcription factor that mediates inflammatory responses, and were unable to induce the expression of inflammatory genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Similar results were obtained in human embryonic stem cells. In addition to the inactive state of NF-κB, the deficiency in the inflammatory response in mouse embryonic stem cells is also attributed to the lack of functional receptors for LPS and TNF-α. In vitro differentiation can trigger the development of the inflammatory response mechanism, as indicated by the transition of NF-κB from its inactive to active state. However, a limited response to TNF-α and viral infection, but not to LPS, was observed in mouse embryonic stem cell-differentiated fibroblasts. We conclude that the inflammatory response mechanism is not active in mouse embryonic stem cells, and in vitro differentiation promotes only partial development of this mechanism. Together with our previous studies, the findings described in this article demonstrate that embryonic stem cells are fundamentally different from differentiated somatic cells in their innate immunity, which may have important implications in developmental biology, immunology, and embryonic stem cell-based regenerative medicine.
Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Spatial and Temporal Spread of Acute Viral Respiratory Infections in Young Children Living in High-altitude Rural Communities: A Prospective Household-based Study.
Cherry CB, Griffin MR, Edwards KM, Williams JV, Gil AI, Verastegui H, Lanata CF, Grijalva CG
(2016) Pediatr Infect Dis J 35: 1057-61
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Altitude, Child, Preschool, Family Characteristics, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Peru, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Tract Infections, Rural Population, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Few studies have described patterns of transmission of viral acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children in developing countries. We examined the spatial and temporal spread of viral ARI among young children in rural Peruvian highland communities. Previous studies have described intense social interactions in those communities, which could influence the transmission of viral infections.
METHODS - We enrolled and followed children <3 years of age for detection of ARI during the 2009 to 2011 respiratory seasons in a rural setting with relatively wide geographic dispersion of households and communities. Viruses detected included influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza 2 and 3 viruses (PIV2, PIV3). We used geospatial analyses to identify specific viral infection hot spots with high ARI incidence. We also explored the local spread of ARI from index cases using standard deviational ellipses.
RESULTS - Geospatial analyses revealed hot spots of high ARI incidence around the index cases of influenza outbreaks and RSV outbreak in 2010. Although PIV3 in 2009 and PIV2 in 2010 showed distinct spatial hot spots, clustering was not in proximity to their respective index cases. No significant aggregation around index cases was noted for other viruses. Standard deviational ellipse analyses suggested that influenza B and RSV in 2010, and human metapneumovirus in 2011 spread temporally in alignment with the major road network.
CONCLUSIONS - Despite the geographic dispersion of communities in this rural setting, we observed a rapid spread of viral ARI among young children. Influenza strains and RSV in 2010 had distinctive outbreaks arising from their index cases.
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Report from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases workshop on drug allergy.
Wheatley LM, Plaut M, Schwaninger JM, Banerji A, Castells M, Finkelman FD, Gleich GJ, Guttman-Yassky E, Mallal SA, Naisbitt DJ, Ostrov DA, Phillips EJ, Pichler WJ, Platts-Mills TA, Roujeau JC, Schwartz LB, Trepanier LA
(2015) J Allergy Clin Immunol 136: 262-71.e2
MeSH Terms: Carbamazepine, Dideoxynucleosides, Drug Hypersensitivity, Gene Expression, HLA Antigens, Haptens, Humans, Immunoglobulin E, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.), Practice Guidelines as Topic, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, Terminology as Topic, Translational Medical Research, United States, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Allergic reactions to drugs are a serious public health concern. In 2013, the Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop on drug allergy. International experts in the field of drug allergy with backgrounds in allergy, immunology, infectious diseases, dermatology, clinical pharmacology, and pharmacogenomics discussed the current state of drug allergy research. These experts were joined by representatives from several National Institutes of Health institutes and the US Food and Drug Administration. The participants identified important advances that make new research directions feasible and made suggestions for research priorities and for development of infrastructure to advance our knowledge of the mechanisms, diagnosis, management, and prevention of drug allergy. The workshop summary and recommendations are presented herein.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Evolving models of the immunopathogenesis of T cell-mediated drug allergy: The role of host, pathogens, and drug response.
White KD, Chung WH, Hung SI, Mallal S, Phillips EJ
(2015) J Allergy Clin Immunol 136: 219-34; quiz 235
MeSH Terms: Allopurinol, B-Lymphocytes, Carbamazepine, Dideoxynucleosides, Drug Hypersensitivity, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Loci, HLA Antigens, Humans, Models, Immunological, Pharmacogenetics, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, T-Lymphocytes, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Immune-mediated (IM) adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an underrecognized source of preventable morbidity, mortality, and cost. Increasingly, genetic variation in the HLA loci is associated with risk of severe reactions, highlighting the importance of T-cell immune responses in the mechanisms of both B cell-mediated and primary T cell-mediated IM-ADRs. In this review we summarize the role of host genetics, microbes, and drugs in IM-ADR development; expand on the existing models of IM-ADR pathogenesis to address multiple unexplained observations; discuss the implications of this work in clinical practice today; and describe future applications for preclinical drug toxicity screening, drug design, and development.
Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Infectious causes of necrotizing enterocolitis.
Coggins SA, Wynn JL, Weitkamp JH
(2015) Clin Perinatol 42: 133-54, ix
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Infections, Candidiasis, Enterocolitis, Necrotizing, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added October 16, 2015
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency among premature infants. Although a large body of research has focused on understanding its pathogenesis, the exact mechanism has not been elucidated. Of particular interest is the potential causative role of infectious culprits in the development of NEC. A variety of reports describe bacterial, viral, and fungal infections occurring in association with NEC; however, no single organism has emerged as being definitively involved in NEC pathogenesis. In this review, the authors summarize the literature on infectious causes of NEC.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
The sweet spot: defining virus-sialic acid interactions.
Stencel-Baerenwald JE, Reiss K, Reiter DM, Stehle T, Dermody TS
(2014) Nat Rev Microbiol 12: 739-49
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, N-Acetylneuraminic Acid, Polysaccharides, Receptors, Cell Surface, Receptors, Virus, Species Specificity, Virus Attachment, Virus Diseases, Viruses
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2015
Viral infections are initiated by attachment of the virus to host cell surface receptors, including sialic acid-containing glycans. It is now possible to rapidly identify specific glycan receptors using glycan array screening, to define atomic-level structures of virus-glycan complexes and to alter the glycan-binding site to determine the function of glycan engagement in viral disease. This Review highlights general principles of virus-glycan interactions and provides specific examples of sialic acid binding by viruses with stalk-like attachment proteins, including influenza virus, reovirus, adenovirus and rotavirus. Understanding virus-glycan interactions is essential to combating viral infections and designing improved viral vectors for therapeutic applications.
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12 MeSH Terms
A household-based study of acute viral respiratory illnesses in Andean children.
Budge PJ, Griffin MR, Edwards KM, Williams JV, Verastegui H, Hartinger SM, Johnson M, Klemenc JM, Zhu Y, Gil AI, Lanata CF, Grijalva CG, RESPIRA-PERU Group
(2014) Pediatr Infect Dis J 33: 443-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Child, Preschool, Family Characteristics, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Nasal Mucosa, Peru, Prevalence, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Respiratory Tract Infections, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Virus Diseases, Viruses
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
BACKGROUND - Few community studies have measured the incidence, severity and etiology of acute respiratory illness (ARI) among children living at high-altitude in remote rural settings.
METHODS - We conducted active, household-based ARI surveillance among children aged <3 years in rural highland communities of San Marcos, Cajamarca, Peru from May 2009 through September 2011 (RESPIRA-PERU study). ARI (defined by fever or cough) were considered lower respiratory tract infections if tachypnea, wheezing, grunting, stridor or retractions were present. Nasal swabs collected during ARI episodes were tested for respiratory viruses by real-time, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. ARI incidence was calculated using Poisson regression.
RESULTS - During 755.1 child-years of observation among 892 children in 58 communities, 4475 ARI were observed, yielding an adjusted incidence of 6.2 ARI/child-year (95% confidence interval: 5.9-6.5). Families sought medical care for 24% of ARI, 4% were classified as lower respiratory tract infections and 1% led to hospitalization. Of 5 deaths among cohort children, 2 were attributed to ARI. One or more respiratory viruses were detected in 67% of 3957 samples collected. Virus-specific incidence rates per 100 child-years were: rhinovirus, 236; adenovirus, 73; parainfluenza virus, 46; influenza, 37; respiratory syncytial virus, 30 and human metapneumovirus, 17. Respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus and parainfluenza virus 1-3 comprised a disproportionate share of lower respiratory tract infections compared with other etiologies.
CONCLUSIONS - In this high-altitude rural setting with low-population density, ARI in young children were common, frequently severe and associated with a number of different respiratory viruses. Effective strategies for prevention and control of these infections are needed.
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16 MeSH Terms