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Vagus Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Epilepsy.
González HFJ, Yengo-Kahn A, Englot DJ
(2019) Neurosurg Clin N Am 30: 219-230
MeSH Terms: Epilepsy, Humans, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added June 22, 2019
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was the first neuromodulation device approved for treatment of epilepsy. In more than 20 years of study, VNS has consistently demonstrated efficacy in treating epilepsy. After 2 years, approximately 50% of patients experience at least 50% reduced seizure frequency. Adverse events with VNS treatment are rare and include surgical adverse events (including infection, vocal cord paresis, and so forth) and stimulation side effects (hoarseness, voice change, and cough). Future developments in VNS, including closed-loop and noninvasive stimulation, may reduce side effects or increase efficacy of VNS.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Quality-of-life metrics with vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy from provider survey data.
Englot DJ, Hassnain KH, Rolston JD, Harward SC, Sinha SR, Haglund MM
(2017) Epilepsy Behav 66: 4-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Quality of Life, Registries, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Drug-resistant epilepsy is a devastating disorder associated with diminished quality of life (QOL). Surgical resection leads to seizure freedom and improved QOL in many epilepsy patients, but not all individuals are candidates for resection. In these cases, neuromodulation-based therapies such as vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) are often used, but most VNS studies focus exclusively on reduction of seizure frequency. QOL changes and predictors with VNS remain poorly understood.
METHOD - Using the VNS Therapy Patient Outcome Registry, we examined 7 metrics related to QOL after VNS for epilepsy in over 5000 patients (including over 3000 with ≥12months follow-up), as subjectively assessed by treating physicians. Trends and predictors of QOL changes were examined and related to post-operative seizure outcome and likelihood of VNS generator replacement.
RESULTS - After VNS therapy, physicians reported patient improvement in alertness (58-63%, range over follow-up period), post-ictal state (55-62%), cluster seizures (48-56%), mood change (43-49%), verbal communication (38-45%), school/professional achievements (29-39%), and memory (29-38%). Predictors of net QOL improvement included shorter time to implant (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.6), generalized seizure type (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), female gender (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), and Caucasian ethnicity (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.5). No significant trends were observed over time. Patients with net QOL improvement were more likely to have favorable seizure outcomes (chi square [χ]=148.1, p<0.001) and more likely to undergo VNS generator replacement (χ=68.9, p<0.001) than those with worsened/unchanged QOL.
SIGNIFICANCE - VNS for drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with improvement on various QOL metrics subjectively rated by physicians. QOL improvement is associated with favorable seizure outcome and a higher likelihood of generator replacement, suggesting satisfaction with therapy. It is important to consider QOL metrics in neuromodulation for epilepsy, given the deleterious effects of seizures on patient QOL.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Rates and Predictors of Seizure Freedom With Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Intractable Epilepsy.
Englot DJ, Rolston JD, Wright CW, Hassnain KH, Chang EF
(2016) Neurosurgery 79: 345-53
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
BACKGROUND - Neuromodulation-based treatments have become increasingly important in epilepsy treatment. Most patients with epilepsy treated with neuromodulation do not achieve complete seizure freedom, and, therefore, previous studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy have focused instead on reduction of seizure frequency as a measure of treatment response.
OBJECTIVE - To elucidate rates and predictors of seizure freedom with VNS.
METHODS - We examined 5554 patients from the VNS therapy Patient Outcome Registry, and also performed a systematic review of the literature including 2869 patients across 78 studies.
RESULTS - Registry data revealed a progressive increase over time in seizure freedom after VNS therapy. Overall, 49% of patients responded to VNS therapy 0 to 4 months after implantation (≥50% reduction seizure frequency), with 5.1% of patients becoming seizure-free, while 63% of patients were responders at 24 to 48 months, with 8.2% achieving seizure freedom. On multivariate analysis, seizure freedom was predicted by age of epilepsy onset >12 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.58), and predominantly generalized seizure type (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.82), while overall response to VNS was predicted by nonlesional epilepsy (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.81). Systematic literature review results were consistent with the registry analysis: At 0 to 4 months, 40.0% of patients had responded to VNS, with 2.6% becoming seizure-free, while at last follow-up, 60.1% of individuals were responders, with 8.0% achieving seizure freedom.
CONCLUSION - Response and seizure freedom rates increase over time with VNS therapy, although complete seizure freedom is achieved in a small percentage of patients.
ABBREVIATIONS - AED, antiepileptic drugVNS, vagus nerve stimulation.
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Corpus callosotomy versus vagus nerve stimulation for atonic seizures and drop attacks: A systematic review.
Rolston JD, Englot DJ, Wang DD, Garcia PA, Chang EF
(2015) Epilepsy Behav 51: 13-7
MeSH Terms: Corpus Callosum, Epilepsy, Generalized, Humans, Psychosurgery, Syncope, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Atonic seizures are debilitating and poorly controlled with antiepileptic medications. Two surgical options are primarily used to treat medically refractory atonic seizures: corpus callosotomy (CC) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). However, given the uncertainty regarding relative efficacy and surgical complications, the best approach for affected patients is unclear. The PubMed database was queried for all articles describing the treatment of atonic seizures and drop attacks with either corpus callosotomy or VNS. Rates of seizure freedom, >50% reduction in seizure frequency, and complications were compared across the two patient groups. Patients were significantly more likely to achieve a >50% reduction in seizure frequency with CC versus VNS (85.6% versus 57.6%; RR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). Adverse events were more common with VNS, though typically mild (e.g., 22% hoarseness and voice changes), compared with CC, where the most common complication was the disconnection syndrome (13.2%). Both CC and VNS are well tolerated for the treatment of refractory atonic seizures. Existing studies suggest that CC is potentially more effective than VNS in reducing seizure frequency, though a direct study comparing these techniques is required before a definitive conclusion can be reached.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy.
Chang EF, Englot DJ, Vadera S
(2015) Epilepsy Behav 47: 24-33
MeSH Terms: Amygdala, Anterior Temporal Lobectomy, Cerebral Cortex, Deep Brain Stimulation, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Middle Aged, Neurosurgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60-80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Vagus nerve stimulation versus "best drug therapy" in epilepsy patients who have failed best drug therapy.
Englot DJ
(2013) Seizure 22: 409-10
MeSH Terms: Anticonvulsants, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Male, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Added August 12, 2016
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Efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation in posttraumatic versus nontraumatic epilepsy.
Englot DJ, Rolston JD, Wang DD, Hassnain KH, Gordon CM, Chang EF
(2012) J Neurosurg 117: 970-7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anticonvulsants, Brain Injuries, Case-Control Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Data Collection, Electrodes, Implanted, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Male, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Seizures, Socioeconomic Factors, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
OBJECT - In the US, approximately 500,000 individuals are hospitalized yearly for traumatic brain injury (TBI), and posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common sequela of TBI. Improved treatment strategies for PTE are critically needed, as patients with the disorder are often resistant to antiepileptic medications and are poor candidates for definitive resection. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an adjunctive treatment for medically refractory epilepsy that results in a ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency in approximately 50% of patients after 1 year of therapy. The role of VNS in PTE has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with PTE attain more favorable seizure outcomes than individuals with nontraumatic epilepsy etiologies.
METHODS - Using a case-control study design, the authors retrospectively compared seizure outcomes after VNS therapy in patients with PTE versus those with nontraumatic epilepsy (non-PTE) who were part of a large prospectively collected patient registry.
RESULTS - After VNS therapy, patients with PTE demonstrated a greater reduction in seizure frequency (50% fewer seizures at the 3-month follow-up; 73% fewer seizures at 24 months) than patients with non-PTE (46% fewer seizures at 3 months; 57% fewer seizures at 24 months). Overall, patients with PTE had a 78% rate of clinical response to VNS therapy at 24 months (that is, ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency) as compared with a 61% response rate among patients with non-PTE (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.07-1.61), leading to improved outcomes according to the Engel classification (p < 0.0001, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistic).
CONCLUSIONS - Vagus nerve stimulation should be considered in patients with medically refractory PTE who are not good candidates for resection. A controlled prospective trial is necessary to further examine seizure outcomes as well as neuropsychological outcomes after VNS therapy in patients with intractable PTE.
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19 MeSH Terms
Comparison of seizure control outcomes and the safety of vagus nerve, thalamic deep brain, and responsive neurostimulation: evidence from randomized controlled trials.
Rolston JD, Englot DJ, Wang DD, Shih T, Chang EF
(2012) Neurosurg Focus 32: E14
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anterior Thalamic Nuclei, Child, Deep Brain Stimulation, Electrodes, Implanted, Epilepsy, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Subthalamic Nucleus, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Epilepsy is a devastating disease, often refractory to medication and not amenable to resective surgery. For patients whose seizures continue despite the best medical and surgical therapy, 3 stimulation-based therapies have demonstrated positive results in prospective randomized trials: vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation of the thalamic anterior nucleus, and responsive neurostimulation. All 3 neuromodulatory therapies offer significant reductions in seizure frequency for patients with partial epilepsy. A direct comparison of trial results, however, reveals important differences among outcomes and surgical risk between devices. The authors review published results from these pivotal trials and highlight important differences between the trials and devices and their application in clinical use.
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18 MeSH Terms
Efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy by patient age, epilepsy duration, and seizure type.
Englot DJ, Chang EF, Auguste KI
(2011) Neurosurg Clin N Am 22: 443-8, v
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Epilepsy, Humans, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Time Factors, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Medically refractory epilepsy is a morbid condition, and many patients are poor candidates for surgical resection because of multifocal seizure origin or eloquence near epileptic foci. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was approved in 1997 by the US Food and Drug Administration as an adjunctive treatment of intractable epilepsy for individuals aged 12 years and more with partial epilepsy. Controversy persists regarding the efficacy of VNS for epilepsy and about which patient populations respond best to therapy. In this article, the authors retrospectively studied a patient outcome registry and report the largest, to their knowledge, analysis of VNS outcomes in epilepsy.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy: a meta-analysis of efficacy and predictors of response.
Englot DJ, Chang EF, Auguste KI
(2011) J Neurosurg 115: 1248-55
MeSH Terms: Epilepsy, Humans, Predictive Value of Tests, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was approved by the US FDA in 1997 as an adjunctive treatment for medically refractory epilepsy. It is considered for use in patients who are poor candidates for resection or those in whom resection has failed. However, disagreement regarding the utility of VNS in epilepsy continues because of the variability in benefit reported across clinical studies. Moreover, although VNS was approved only for adults and adolescents with partial epilepsy, its efficacy in children and in patients with generalized epilepsy remains unclear. The authors performed the first meta-analysis of VNS efficacy in epilepsy, identifying 74 clinical studies with 3321 patients suffering from intractable epilepsy. These studies included 3 blinded, randomized controlled trials (Class I evidence); 2 nonblinded, randomized controlled trials (Class II evidence); 10 prospective studies (Class III evidence); and numerous retrospective studies. After VNS, seizure frequency was reduced by an average of 45%, with a 36% reduction in seizures at 3-12 months after surgery and a 51% reduction after > 1 year of therapy. At the last follow-up, seizures were reduced by 50% or more in approximately 50% of the patients, and VNS predicted a ≥ 50% reduction in seizures with a main effects OR of 1.83 (95% CI 1.80-1.86). Patients with generalized epilepsy and children benefited significantly from VNS despite their exclusion from initial approval of the device. Furthermore, posttraumatic epilepsy and tuberous sclerosis were positive predictors of a favorable outcome. In conclusion, VNS is an effective and relatively safe adjunctive therapy in patients with medically refractory epilepsy not amenable to resection. However, it is important to recognize that complete seizure freedom is rarely achieved using VNS and that a quarter of patients do not receive any benefit from therapy.
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6 MeSH Terms