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Prior Dengue Virus Exposure Shapes T Cell Immunity to Zika Virus in Humans.
Grifoni A, Pham J, Sidney J, O'Rourke PH, Paul S, Peters B, Martini SR, de Silva AD, Ricciardi MJ, Magnani DM, Silveira CGT, Maestri A, Costa PR, de-Oliveira-Pinto LM, de Azeredo EL, Damasco PV, Phillips E, Mallal S, de Silva AM, Collins M, Durbin A, Diehl SA, Cerpas C, Balmaseda A, Kuan G, Coloma J, Harris E, Crowe JE, Stone M, Norris PJ, Busch M, Vivanco-Cid H, Cox J, Graham BS, Ledgerwood JE, Turtle L, Solomon T, Kallas EG, Watkins DI, Weiskopf D, Sette A
(2017) J Virol 91:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Cross Reactions, Dengue Vaccines, Dengue Virus, Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, T-Lymphocytes, Vaccines, Attenuated, Young Adult, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
While progress has been made in characterizing humoral immunity to Zika virus (ZIKV) in humans, little is known regarding the corresponding T cell responses to ZIKV. Here, we investigate the kinetics and viral epitopes targeted by T cells responding to ZIKV and address the critical question of whether preexisting dengue virus (DENV) T cell immunity modulates these responses. We find that memory T cell responses elicited by prior infection with DENV or vaccination with tetravalent dengue attenuated vaccines (TDLAV) recognize ZIKV-derived peptides. This cross-reactivity is explained by the sequence similarity of the two viruses, as the ZIKV peptides recognized by DENV-elicited memory T cells are identical or highly conserved in DENV and ZIKV. DENV exposure prior to ZIKV infection also influences the timing and magnitude of the T cell response. ZIKV-reactive T cells in the acute phase of infection are detected earlier and in greater magnitude in DENV-immune patients. Conversely, the frequency of ZIKV-reactive T cells continues to rise in the convalescent phase in DENV-naive donors but declines in DENV-preexposed donors, compatible with more efficient control of ZIKV replication and/or clearance of ZIKV antigen. The quality of responses is also influenced by previous DENV exposure, and ZIKV-specific CD8 T cells from DENV-preexposed donors selectively upregulated granzyme B and PD1, unlike DENV-naive donors. Finally, we discovered that ZIKV structural proteins (E, prM, and C) are major targets of both the CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, whereas DENV T cell epitopes are found primarily in nonstructural proteins. The issue of potential ZIKV and DENV cross-reactivity and how preexisting DENV T cell immunity modulates Zika T cell responses is of great relevance, as the two viruses often cocirculate and Zika virus has been spreading in geographical regions where DENV is endemic or hyperendemic. Our data show that memory T cell responses elicited by prior infection with DENV recognize ZIKV-derived peptides and that DENV exposure prior to ZIKV infection influences the timing, magnitude, and quality of the T cell response. Additionally, we show that ZIKV-specific responses target different proteins than DENV-specific responses, pointing toward important implications for vaccine design against this global threat.
Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.
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19 MeSH Terms
Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.
Nivarthi UK, Kose N, Sapparapu G, Widman D, Gallichotte E, Pfaff JM, Doranz BJ, Weiskopf D, Sette A, Durbin AP, Whitehead SS, Baric R, Crowe JE, de Silva AM
(2017) J Virol 91:
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Aedes, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Line, Dengue, Dengue Virus, Epitope Mapping, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Vaccination, Vaccines, Attenuated, Viral Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses, but these principally recognize only the infecting serotype. An effective vaccine against dengue should elicit long-lasting protective antibody responses to all four serotypes simultaneously. We and others have defined antigenic sites on the envelope (E) protein of viruses of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, and 3 targeted by human neutralizing antibodies. The epitopes on DENV4 E protein targeted by the human neutralizing antibodies and the mechanisms of serotype 4 neutralization are poorly understood. Here, we report the properties of human antibodies that neutralize dengue virus serotype 4. People exposed to serotype 4 infections or a live attenuated serotype 4 vaccine developed neutralizing antibodies that bound to similar sites on the viral E protein. These studies have provided a foundation for developing and evaluating DENV4 vaccines.
Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.
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17 MeSH Terms
Live vaccine use and safety in DiGeorge syndrome.
Hofstetter AM, Jakob K, Klein NP, Dekker CL, Edwards KM, Halsey NA, Baxter R, Williams SE, Graham PL, LaRussa P
(2014) Pediatrics 133: e946-54
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, DiGeorge Syndrome, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Retrospective Studies, Vaccines, Attenuated, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Live vaccines are generally contraindicated in patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), a congenital disorder characterized by cellular immune deficiency. Vaccine utilization and safety in this population are not well described. This study examined vaccination patterns and adverse events following live immunization (AEFLI) in these individuals.
METHODS - A multicenter retrospective cohort study was conducted in subjects with DGS confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization assay (chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion). Live vaccine-preventable illnesses, vaccination coverage and timeliness, and AEFLIs in the 56-day window after live vaccination were examined. Bivariate and multivariable analyses assessed the impact of demographics medical history, timing of diagnostic confirmation, and preceding immune function on vaccination patterns and AEFLIs.
RESULTS - Of 194 subjects, 77% and 75% received measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and varicella vaccines, respectively; 58% completed recommended vaccinations by age 19 to 35 months. Adverse events occurred after 14% and 20% of MMR and varicella vaccine doses, respectively. Most events were minor, few were serious, and no deaths were reported in post-live vaccination windows. Although early diagnostic confirmation negatively affected live vaccination coverage and timeliness (P < .001), baseline CD4% did not differ between subjects who did or did not receive live vaccines by 12 to 18 months. Among varicella vaccine recipients, those with a subsequent adverse event had a lower preceding CD4% (24.8% ± 7.3%) than those without (35.5% ± 11.7%) (P < .05); no CD4% differences were observed with MMR vaccination. Fourteen unvaccinated subjects experienced live vaccine-preventable illnesses.
CONCLUSIONS - Live vaccines were frequently given and generally well-tolerated among patients with DGS with mild-to-moderate immunosuppression.
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Determining the effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department visits using two study designs.
Donauer S, Payne DC, Edwards KM, Szilagyi PG, Hornung RW, Weinberg GA, Chappell J, Hall CB, Parashar UD, Staat MA
(2013) Vaccine 31: 2692-7
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Gastroenteritis, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Male, New York, Ohio, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, Tennessee, Vaccines, Attenuated
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
The objective of this study is to determine the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits during the 2006-07 and 2007-08 rotavirus seasons using two study designs. Active, prospective population-based surveillance was conducted to identify cases of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits to be used in case-cohort and case-control designs. VE was calculated using one comparison group for the case-cohort method and two comparison groups for the case-control method. The VE estimates produced by the three analyses were similar. Three doses of RV5 were effective for preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits in each analysis, with VE estimated as 92% in all three analyses. Two doses of RV5 were also effective, with VE ranging from 79% to 83%. A single dose was effective in the case-cohort analysis, but was not significant in either of the case-control analyses. The case-cohort and the case-control study designs produced the same VE point estimates for completion of the three dose series. Two and three doses of RV5 were effective in preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations and ED visits.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Human monoclonal antibodies derived from memory B cells following live attenuated dengue virus vaccination or natural infection exhibit similar characteristics.
Smith SA, de Alwis R, Kose N, Durbin AP, Whitehead SS, de Silva AM, Crowe JE
(2013) J Infect Dis 207: 1898-908
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antibody-Dependent Enhancement, Antigens, Viral, B-Lymphocytes, California, Cell Line, Cross Reactions, Dengue, Dengue Vaccines, Dengue Virus, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Hybridomas, Neutralization Tests, North Carolina, Recombinant Proteins, Vaccination, Vaccines, Attenuated
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The immunopathogenesis of severe dengue is poorly understood, but there is concern that induction of cross-reactive nonneutralizing antibodies by infection or vaccination may increase the likelihood of severe disease during a subsequent infection. We generated a total of 63 new human monoclonal antibodies to compare the B-cell response of subjects who received the National Institutes of Health live attenuated dengue vaccine rDEN1Δ30 to that of subjects following symptomatic primary infection with DENV1. Both infection and vaccination induced serum neutralizing antibodies and DENV1-reactive peripheral blood B cells, but the magnitude of induction was lower in vaccinated individuals. Serotype cross-reactive weakly neutralizing antibodies dominated the response in both vaccinated and naturally infected subjects. Antigen specificities were very similar, with a slightly greater percentage of antibodies targeting E protein domain I/II than domain III. These data shed light on the similarity of human B-cell response to live attenuated DENV vaccine or natural infection.
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20 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of pentavalent and monovalent rotavirus vaccines in concurrent use among US children <5 years of age, 2009-2011.
Payne DC, Boom JA, Staat MA, Edwards KM, Szilagyi PG, Klein EJ, Selvarangan R, Azimi PH, Harrison C, Moffatt M, Johnston SH, Sahni LC, Baker CJ, Rench MA, Donauer S, McNeal M, Chappell J, Weinberg GA, Tasslimi A, Tate JE, Wikswo M, Curns AT, Sulemana I, Mijatovic-Rustempasic S, Esona MD, Bowen MD, Gentsch JR, Parashar UD
(2013) Clin Infect Dis 57: 13-20
MeSH Terms: Ambulatory Care, Child, Preschool, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Feces, Female, Gastroenteritis, Genotype, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Male, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, United States, Vaccines, Attenuated
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
BACKGROUND - We assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) for RotaTeq (RV5; 3 doses) and Rotarix (RV1; 2 doses) at reducing rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (AGE) inpatient and emergency department (ED) visits in US children.
METHODS - We enrolled children <5 years of age hospitalized or visiting the ED with AGE symptoms from November 2009-June 2010 and from November 2010-June 2011 at 7 medical institutions. Fecal specimens were tested for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped. Vaccination among laboratory-confirmed rotavirus cases was compared with rotavirus-negative AGE controls. Regression models calculated VE estimates for each vaccine, age, ethnicity, genotype, and clinical setting.
RESULTS - RV5-specific analyses included 359 rotavirus cases and 1811 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. RV1-specific analyses included 60 rotavirus cases and 155 rotavirus-negative AGE controls. RV5 and RV1 were 84% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78%-88%) and 70% (95% CI, 39%-86%) effective, respectively, against rotavirus-associated ED visits and hospitalizations combined. By clinical setting, RV5 VE against ED and inpatient rotavirus-associated visits was 81% (95% CI, 70%-84%) and 86% (95% CI, 74%-91%), respectively. RV1 was 78% (95% CI, 46%-91%) effective against ED rotavirus disease; study power was insufficient to evaluate inpatient RV1 VE. No waning of immunity was evident during the first 4 years of life for RV5, nor during the first 2 years of life for RV1. RV5 provided genotype-specific protection against each of the predominant strains (G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G12P[8]), while RV1 VE was statistically significant for the most common genotype, G3P[8].
CONCLUSIONS - Both RV5 and RV1 significantly protected against medically attended rotavirus gastroenteritis in this real-world assessment.
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16 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of non-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A vaccines for preventing pandemic influenza acute respiratory illness visits in 4 U.S. communities.
Griffin MR, Monto AS, Belongia EA, Treanor JJ, Chen Q, Chen J, Talbot HK, Ohmit SE, Coleman LA, Lofthus G, Petrie JG, Meece JK, Hall CB, Williams JV, Gargiullo P, Berman L, Shay DK, U.S. Flu-VE Network
(2011) PLoS One 6: e23085
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Adolescent, Adult, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Infant, Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Pandemics, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vaccines, Attenuated, Vaccines, Inactivated, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
We estimated the effectiveness of four monovalent pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccines (three unadjuvanted inactivated, one live attenuated) available in the U.S. during the pandemic. Patients with acute respiratory illness presenting to inpatient and outpatient facilities affiliated with four collaborating institutions were prospectively recruited, consented, and tested for influenza. Analyses were restricted to October 2009 through April 2010, when pandemic vaccine was available. Patients testing positive for pandemic influenza by real-time RT-PCR were cases; those testing negative were controls. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated in logistic regression models adjusted for study community, patient age, timing of illness, insurance status, enrollment site, and presence of high-risk medical conditions. Pandemic virus was detected in 1,011 (15%) of 6,757 enrolled patients. Fifteen (1%) of 1,011 influenza positive cases and 1,042 (18%) of 5,746 test-negative controls had record-verified pandemic vaccination >14 days prior to illness onset. Adjusted effectiveness (95% confidence interval) for pandemic vaccines combined was 56% (23%, 75%). Adjusted effectiveness for inactivated vaccines alone (79% of total) was 62% (25%, 81%) overall and 32% (-92%, 76%), 89% (15%, 99%), and -6% (-231%, 66%) in those aged 0.5 to 9, 10 to 49, and 50+ years, respectively. Effectiveness for the live attenuated vaccine in those aged 2 to 49 years was only demonstrated if vaccination >7 rather than >14 days prior to illness onset was considered (61%∶ 12%, 82%). Inactivated non-adjuvanted pandemic vaccines offered significant protection against confirmed pandemic influenza-associated medical care visits in young adults.
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24 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe disease.
Staat MA, Payne DC, Donauer S, Weinberg GA, Edwards KM, Szilagyi PG, Griffin MR, Hall CB, Curns AT, Gentsch JR, Salisbury S, Fairbrother G, Parashar UD, New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN)
(2011) Pediatrics 128: e267-75
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Child, Preschool, Female, Gastroenteritis, Humans, Infant, Male, Prospective Studies, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, Severity of Illness Index, Treatment Outcome, Vaccines, Attenuated
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
OBJECTIVE - To determine the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of complete and partial vaccination with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in the prevention of rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalizations and emergency department visits during the first 3 rotavirus seasons after vaccine introduction.
METHODS - Active, prospective population-based surveillance for AGE and acute respiratory infection (ARIs) in inpatient and emergency department settings provided subjects for a case-control evaluation of VE in 3 US counties from January 2006 through June 2009. Children with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus AGE (cases) were matched according to date of birth and onset of illness to 2 sets of controls: children with rotavirus-negative AGE and children with ARI. The main outcome measure was VE with complete (3 doses) or partial (1 or 2 doses) RV5 vaccination.
RESULTS - Of age-eligible children enrolled, 18% of cases, 54% of AGE controls, and 54% of ARI controls received ≥1 dose of RV5. The VE of RV5 for 1, 2, and 3 doses against all rotavirus genotypes with the use of rotavirus-negative AGE controls was 74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37%-90%), 88% (95% CI: 66%-96%), and 87% (95% CI: 71%-94%), respectively, and with the use of ARI controls was 73% (95% CI: 43%-88%), 88% (95% CI: 68%-95%), and 85% (95% CI: 72%-91%), respectively. The overall VE estimates were comparable during the first and second years of life and against AGE caused by different rotavirus strains.
CONCLUSION - RV5 was highly effective in preventing severe rotavirus disease, even after a partial series, with protection persisting throughout the second year of life.
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13 MeSH Terms
Changes in childhood diarrhea incidence in nicaragua following 3 years of universal infant rotavirus immunization.
Becker-Dreps S, Paniagua M, Dominik R, Cao H, Shah NK, Morgan DR, Moreno G, Espinoza F
(2011) Pediatr Infect Dis J 30: 243-7
MeSH Terms: Child, Preschool, Diarrhea, Female, Health Services Research, Humans, Immunization, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Nicaragua, Rotavirus Vaccines, Vaccines, Attenuated
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
BACKGROUND - Although the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was highly efficacious against rotavirus diarrhea in clinical trials, the effectiveness of vaccine under field conditions in the developing world is unclear. In October 2006, Nicaragua became the first developing nation to implement universal infant immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. To assess the effect of the immunization program, we examined the incidence of diarrhea episodes between 2003 and 2009 among children in the state of León, Nicaragua.
METHODS - We extracted data on diarrhea episodes from health ministry records. We used scaled Poisson regression models to estimate diarrhea incidence rate ratios for the period following the program's implementation to the period before implementation.
RESULTS - Following implementation of the immunization program, diarrhea episodes among infants were reduced (incidence rate ratios: 0.85, 95% confidence interval: 0.71-1.02) during the rotavirus season, but appear to have increased during other months.
CONCLUSIONS - Although the immunization program appears effective in reducing diarrhea episodes during the rotavirus season, a large burden of diarrhea still persists during the remainder of the year.
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13 MeSH Terms
Sibling transmission of vaccine-derived rotavirus (RotaTeq) associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis.
Payne DC, Edwards KM, Bowen MD, Keckley E, Peters J, Esona MD, Teel EN, Kent D, Parashar UD, Gentsch JR
(2010) Pediatrics 125: e438-41
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Capsid Proteins, Child, Preschool, Feces, Gastroenteritis, Humans, Infant, Male, Reassortant Viruses, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, Siblings, Vaccines, Attenuated, Virulence, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added May 5, 2010
Although rotavirus vaccines are known to be shed in stools, transmission of vaccine-derived virus to unvaccinated contacts resulting in symptomatic rotavirus gastroenteritis has not been reported to our knowledge. We document here the occurrence of vaccine-derived rotavirus (RotaTeq [Merck and Co, Whitehouse Station, NJ]) transmission from a vaccinated infant to an older, unvaccinated sibling, resulting in symptomatic rotavirus gastroenteritis that required emergency department care. Results of our investigation suggest that reassortment between vaccine component strains of genotypes P7[5]G1 and P1A[8]G6 occurred during replication either in the vaccinated infant or in the older sibling, raising the possibility that this reassortment may have increased the virulence of the vaccine-derived virus. Both children remain healthy 11 months after this event and are without underlying medical conditions.
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16 MeSH Terms