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Women With Overactive Bladder Exhibit More Unhealthy Toileting Behaviors: A Cross-sectional Study.
Daily AM, Kowalik CG, Delpe SD, Kaufman MR, Dmochowski RR, Reynolds WS
(2019) Urology 134: 97-102
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bathroom Equipment, Behavioral Symptoms, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Quality of Life, Risk Factors, Self Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, Symptom Assessment, United States, Urinary Bladder, Overactive, Urinary Incontinence, Urge, Urination
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To determine whether women overactive bladder symptoms would report more frequent unhealthy toileting behaviors.
METHODS - A community-based sample of adult women was electronically recruited to complete the Toileting Behavior Scale and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Overactive Bladder module, as well as clinical and demographic questionnaires. The associations between overactive bladder and toileting behavior subscales were assessed as continuous variables using Spearman's rank correlation and as dichotomous variables with multivariable logistic regression.
RESULTS - Of the 6562 adult women included in the analytic sample, 1059 (16.1%) were classified as having overactive bladder. Of the toileting behavior subscales, convenience voiding had the highest, positive association with overactive bladder score (r = 0.301, P < .0001). On multivariable logistic regression, women with overactive bladder (OAB) were more likely to report behaviors of convenience voiding (odds ratio [OR] 1.13, confidence intervals [CI] 1.11-1.15), delayed voiding (OR 1.05, CI 1.02-1.08), straining to void (OR 1.05, CI 1.03-1.07), and position preference (OR 1.13, CI 1.08-1.18).
CONCLUSION - OAB symptoms were associated with specific toileting behaviors of convenience voiding, delayed voiding, straining to void, and position preference. Further investigation is needed to determine if toileting behaviors are a risk factor for OAB or a compensatory adaptation to mitigate symptoms.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Road to recovery after transvaginal surgery for urethral mesh perforation: evaluation of outcomes and subsequent procedures.
Kowalik CG, Cohn JA, Kakos A, Lang P, Reynolds WS, Kaufman MR, Karram MM, Dmochowski RR
(2018) Int Urogynecol J 29: 887-892
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Suburethral Slings, Surgical Mesh, Treatment Outcome, Urethra, Urinary Incontinence, Stress, Urinary Incontinence, Urge
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS - Urethral injury resulting from transvaginal mesh slings is a rare complication with an estimated incidence of <1%. Our objective was to review the surgical management and functional outcomes of women presenting with urethral mesh perforation following midurethral sling (MUS) placement.
METHODS - This was a retrospective multicenter review of women who from January 2011 to March 2016 at two institutions underwent mesh sling excision for urethral perforation with Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship-trained surgeons. Data comprising preoperative symptoms, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were collected by telephone (n 13) or based on their last follow-up appointment.
RESULTS OBTAINED - Nineteen women underwent transvaginal sling excision for urethral mesh perforation. Eight (42%) patients had undergone previous sling revision surgery. Sixty percent of women had resolution of their pelvic pain postoperatively. At follow-up, 92% reported urinary incontinence (UI), and three had undergone five additional procedures for vaginal prolapse mesh exposure (n 1), incontinence (onabotulinum toxin injection n 1, rectus fascia autologous sling n 1), prolapse (colpopexy n 1), and pain (trigger-point injection n 1). Patient global impression of improvement data was available for 13 patients, of whom seven (54%) rated their postoperative condition as Very much better or Much better.
CONCLUSIONS - The management of urethral mesh perforation is complex. Most women reported resolution of their pelvic pain and a high rate of satisfaction with their postoperative condition despite high rates of incontinence.
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Health literacy, cognition, and urinary incontinence among geriatric inpatients discharged to skilled nursing facilities.
Cohn JA, Shah AS, Goggins KM, Simmons SF, Kripalani S, Dmochowski RR, Schnelle JF, Reynolds WS
(2018) Neurourol Urodyn 37: 854-860
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cognition, Depression, Female, Frail Elderly, Geriatric Assessment, Health Literacy, Humans, Inpatients, Male, Patient Discharge, Sex Factors, Skilled Nursing Facilities, Urinary Incontinence
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
AIMS - To investigate the association between health literacy and cognition and nursing and patient-reported incontinence in a geriatric inpatient population transitioning to skilled nursing facilities (SNF).
METHODS - Health literacy, depression, and cognition were assessed via the Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS), Geriatric Depression Scale 5-item (GDS) and Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS), respectively. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the association between BHLS score and incontinence by: (1) nursing-reported urinary incontinence during hospitalization; and (2) patient self-reported "bladder accidents" in the post-enrollment study interview.
RESULTS - A total of 1556 hospitalized patients aged 65 and older met inclusion criteria, of whom 922 (59.3%) were women and 1480 had available BHLS scores. A total of 464 (29.8%) and 515 (33.1%) patients had nursing-reported and self-reported urinary incontinence, respectively. Nursing-reported incontinence was significantly associated with lower BHLS (ie, poorer health literacy) (aOR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89-0.99) and BIMS (ie, poorer cognition) (aOR 0.90, 95%CI 0.83-0.97) scores and need for assistance with toileting (aOR 7.08, 95%CI 2.16-23.21). Patient-reported incontinence was significantly associated with female sex (aOR 1.62, 95%CI 1.19-2.21), increased GDS score (ie, greater likelihood of depression) (aOR 1.22, 95%CI 1.10-1.36) and need for assistance with toileting (aOR 2.46, 95%CI 1.26-4.79).
CONCLUSIONS - Poorer health literacy and cognition are independently associated with an increased likelihood of nursing-reported urinary incontinence among geriatric inpatients transitioning to SNF. Practitioners should consider assessment of health literacy and cognition in frail patients at risk for urinary incontinence and that patient and nursing assessment may be required to capture the diagnosis.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Incontinence rates after midurethral sling revision for vaginal exposure or pain.
Jambusaria LH, Heft J, Reynolds WS, Dmochowski R, Biller DH
(2016) Am J Obstet Gynecol 215: 764.e1-764.e5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Cohort Studies, Device Removal, Dyspareunia, Equipment Failure, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Pain, Postoperative, Postoperative Complications, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies, Suburethral Slings, Surgical Mesh, Urinary Incontinence, Stress, Urinary Incontinence, Urge, Urologic Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
BACKGROUND - Midurethral slings have become the preferred surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence. Midline transection of midurethral sling for dysfunctional voiding is an effective treatment and also has a low rate of recurrent stress incontinence. Recurrent stress incontinence after sling revision for pain and mesh exposure has not been well defined. It is therefore difficult to counsel patients on risk of recurrent stress incontinence when sling revision is performed for pain or mesh exposure.
OBJECTIVE - We examined the rate of postoperative stress incontinence after midurethral sling revision for the indication of mesh exposure or pain, as well as postoperative pain and urinary urgency.
STUDY DESIGN - This is a retrospective cohort of 245 patients undergoing a vaginal midurethral sling revision in a 10-year period for the indication of mesh exposure or pain. Preoperative indication for revision, baseline characteristics, and preoperative reports of stress incontinence, pain, and urgency were collected. The type of sling revision was then categorized into partial or complete removal. A partial removal of the sling was defined as removing only the portion of sling exposed or causing pain. A complete removal of the sling was defined as vaginal removal of sling laterally out to the pubic rami. Subjective reports of stress incontinence, pain, and urgency at short-term (16 weeks) and long-term (>16 weeks) follow-up visits were gathered. The primary outcome of the study was recurrent stress incontinence.
RESULTS - In our cohort of 245 women who underwent midurethral sling revision, 94 patients had removal for mesh exposure (36 partial and 58 complete) and 151 had removal for pain (25 partial and 126 complete). All patients had a short-term follow-up with a mean time of 5.9 ± 2.8 weeks and 69% patients had long-term follow-up with a mean time of 29.1 ± 17.7 weeks. No differences were seen in preoperative reports of stress incontinence, urgency, or pain in either group. In the patients with revision for mesh exposure with no preoperative stress incontinence, there was greater postoperative stress incontinence with complete vs partial removal of sling at short-term (14% vs 42%, P = .03) and long-term (7% vs 59%, P = .003) follow-up. In the patients with revision for pain with no preoperative stress incontinence, there was no statistically significant difference in recurrent stress incontinence with complete sling removal at long-term follow-up (22% vs 56%, P = .07). In the patients with midurethral sling revision for pain, 72% of partial and 76% of complete sling removal had resolution of pain postoperatively (P = .66). No difference was seen in postoperative reports of urgency or pain improvement in either group between partial or complete sling removal.
CONCLUSION - In women undergoing midurethral sling revision for mesh exposure, complete sling removal resulted in higher recurrent stress incontinence compared to partial sling removal. For the indication of pain, both partial and complete sling removal improved pain in the majority of patients, but there was no statistically significant difference in recurrent stress incontinence.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Effectiveness of blinding: sham suprapubic incisions in a randomized trial of retropubic midurethral sling in women undergoing vaginal prolapse surgery.
Brubaker L, Nager CW, Richter HE, Weidner AC, Hsu Y, Wai CY, Paraiso M, Nolen TL, Wallace D, Meikle S, NICHD Pelvic Floor Disorders Network
(2014) Am J Obstet Gynecol 211: 554.e1-7
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Perception, Placebo Effect, Placebos, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Suburethral Slings, Treatment Outcome, Urinary Incontinence, Stress, Uterine Prolapse
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
OBJECTIVE - This planned secondary analysis of the Outcomes Following Vaginal Prolapse Repairs and Midurethral Sling trial assessed whether treatment knowledge differed between randomized groups at 12 months and whether treatment success was affected by treatment perception.
STUDY DESIGN - Sham suprapubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) incisions were made in the Outcomes Following Vaginal Prolapse Repairs and Midurethral Sling trial participants randomized to no-TVT. Primary surgical outcomes and maintenance of blinding was assessed at 12 months. Knowledge of treatment assignment was compared between groups, and the relationship with treatment success rates was assessed.
RESULTS - Prior to the 12 month postoperative visit, only 4% of treated participants (13 of 336) formally reported unmasking. At 12 months, 94% of the randomized participants (315 of 336) provided treatment knowledge data. Sixteen TVT participants (10%) reported treatment knowledge; most (n = 15, 94%) were correct; 17 of the sham participants (11%) reported treatment knowledge; half (n = 8, 47%) were correct. Similar proportions of unmasked participants who reported no treatment knowledge correctly guessed/perceived treatment assignment (sham, 46 [33%] vs TVT, 44 [33%]). We did not detect significant differences in treatment success rates based on perception within and across received treatment groups (perceived sham vs TVT overall [P = .76]). Of those receiving TVT, more participants perceiving TVT had treatment success compared with those who perceived sham (84% vs 74%; P = .29). Among sham participants, more participants perceiving sham had success compared with those who perceived receiving TVT (65% vs 56%; P = .42).
CONCLUSION - Sham surgical incisions effectively mask TVT randomization. These findings may help to inform future surgical trial designs.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Contemporary prevalence of pretreatment urinary, sexual, hormonal, and bowel dysfunction: Defining the population at risk for harms of prostate cancer treatment.
Resnick MJ, Barocas DA, Morgans AK, Phillips SE, Chen VW, Cooperberg MR, Goodman M, Greenfield S, Hamilton AS, Hoffman KE, Kaplan SH, Paddock LE, Stroup AM, Wu XC, Koyama T, Penson DF
(2014) Cancer 120: 1263-71
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Aged, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Erectile Dysfunction, Hormones, Humans, Intestinal Diseases, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Prostatic Neoplasms, Risk Factors, Urinary Incontinence
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
BACKGROUND - The authors investigated the prevalence of pretreatment urinary, sexual, hormonal, and bowel dysfunction in a contemporary, population-based prostate cancer cohort. They also explored the associations between baseline function and age, comorbidity, and timing of baseline survey completion with respect to treatment.
METHODS - The Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation (CEASAR) study is a population-based, prospective cohort study that enrolled 3691 men with incident prostate cancer during 2011 and 2012. Pretreatment function was ascertained using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index-26 (EPIC-26). Data were stratified by age, comorbidity, and timing of baseline survey completion with respect to treatment. Unadjusted and multivariable linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relations between exposures and pretreatment function.
RESULTS - After applying exclusion criteria, the study cohort comprised 3072 men. A strikingly high proportion of men reported inability to obtain erections satisfactory for intercourse (45%) and some degree of urinary incontinence (17%) at baseline. Sexual function was particularly age-sensitive, with patients aged ≤60 years reporting summary scores in excess of 30 points higher than patients aged ≥75 years (P < .001). Compared with the healthiest men, highly comorbid patients reported less favorable function in each domain, including urinary incontinence (summary score, 89.5 vs 74.1; P < .001) and sexual function (summary score, 70.8 vs 32.9; P < .001). Although statistically significant differences in summary scores were identified between patients who completed the baseline questionnaire before treatment (52%) versus after treatment (48%), the absolute differences were small (range, 1-3 points).
CONCLUSIONS - Patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer exhibit a wide distribution of pretreatment function. The current data may be used to redefine the population "at risk" for treatment-related harms.
© 2014 American Cancer Society.
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Outcomes of incontinent ileovesicostomy in the pediatric patient.
Ching CB, Stephany HA, Juliano TM, Clayton DB, Tanaka ST, Thomas JC, Adams MC, Brock JW, Pope JC
(2014) J Urol 191: 445-50
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Comorbidity, Cystostomy, Female, Humans, Ileostomy, Infant, Intermittent Urethral Catheterization, Male, Meningomyelocele, Postoperative Complications, Reconstructive Surgical Procedures, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome, Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic, Urinary Diversion, Urinary Incontinence, Urodynamics
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
PURPOSE - Ileovesicostomy is a reconstructive option in complex urological cases but pediatric specific outcomes are lacking. We report our results with pediatric ileovesicostomy.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We retrospectively evaluated patients younger than 18 years undergoing incontinent ileovesicostomy at Vanderbilt University. History, urinary tract management and operative course were reviewed in the electronic medical record. Particular attention was given to immediate and long-term postoperative complications.
RESULTS - Nine patients underwent incontinent ileovesicostomy between 2000 and 2013 at a mean age of 10.3 years (range 1.4 to 15.5). Surgical indication was sequelae of neurogenic or nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder (such as infection or worsening hydronephrosis) in 5 patients, reversal of vesicostomy in 3 and closure of cloacal exstrophy in 1. All 9 patients were thought incapable of reliable clean intermittent catheterization due to family unwillingness, poor social support or patient refusal. Median followup was 11.5 months (mean 48.2, range 1.3 to 144.8). Immediate postoperative complications included ileus requiring total parenteral nutrition and a wound infection in 1 patient. Long-term complications included urinary tract infection in 2 patients (febrile in 1 and positive culture for foul smelling urine in 1), stomal issues in 2 and temporary urethral leakage in 1. Constipation affected 3 children in long-term followup (all with neurogenic bowel preoperatively). Postoperative creatinine was stable or improved in all patients.
CONCLUSIONS - Ileovesicostomy is a viable approach in children left with few other options, particularly those who are noncompliant or physically/socially unable to handle catheterization. This operation can help keep such patients out of diapers.
Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Time to raise the bar in localised prostate cancer.
Penson DF
(2013) BJU Int 112: 278
MeSH Terms: Erectile Dysfunction, Humans, Male, Prostatectomy, Prostatic Neoplasms, Robotics, Urinary Incontinence
Added March 5, 2014
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Post-prostatectomy incontinence and pelvic floor muscle training: a defining problem.
Penson DF
(2013) Eur Urol 64: 773-5; discussion 775-6
MeSH Terms: Exercise Therapy, Humans, Male, Pelvic Floor, Prostatectomy, Urinary Incontinence
Added March 5, 2014
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6 MeSH Terms
Long-term functional outcomes after treatment for localized prostate cancer.
Resnick MJ, Koyama T, Fan KH, Albertsen PC, Goodman M, Hamilton AS, Hoffman RM, Potosky AL, Stanford JL, Stroup AM, Van Horn RL, Penson DF
(2013) N Engl J Med 368: 436-45
MeSH Terms: Aged, Erectile Dysfunction, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intestinal Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Postoperative Complications, Prevalence, Prostatectomy, Prostatic Neoplasms, Radiotherapy, Urinary Incontinence
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - The purpose of this analysis was to compare long-term urinary, bowel, and sexual function after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiation therapy.
METHODS - The Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study (PCOS) enrolled 3533 men in whom prostate cancer had been diagnosed in 1994 or 1995. The current cohort comprised 1655 men in whom localized prostate cancer had been diagnosed between the ages of 55 and 74 years and who had undergone either surgery (1164 men) or radiotherapy (491 men). Functional status was assessed at baseline and at 2, 5, and 15 years after diagnosis. We used multivariable propensity scoring to compare functional outcomes according to treatment.
RESULTS - Patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have urinary incontinence than were those undergoing radiotherapy at 2 years (odds ratio, 6.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 20.29) and 5 years (odds ratio, 5.10; 95% CI, 2.29 to 11.36). However, no significant between-group difference in the odds of urinary incontinence was noted at 15 years. Similarly, although patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have erectile dysfunction at 2 years (odds ratio, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.93 to 6.17) and 5 years (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.05 to 3.63), no significant between-group difference was noted at 15 years. Patients undergoing prostatectomy were less likely to have bowel urgency at 2 years (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.68) and 5 years (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.84), again with no significant between-group difference in the odds of bowel urgency at 15 years.
CONCLUSIONS - At 15 years, no significant relative differences in disease-specific functional outcomes were observed among men undergoing prostatectomy or radiotherapy. Nonetheless, men treated for localized prostate cancer commonly had declines in all functional domains during 15 years of follow-up. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute.).
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14 MeSH Terms