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Advances in the local and targeted delivery of anti-infective agents for management of osteomyelitis.
Ford CA, Cassat JE
(2017) Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 15: 851-860
MeSH Terms: Absorbable Implants, Anti-Infective Agents, Copper, Debridement, Disease Management, Drug Delivery Systems, Humans, Microspheres, Osteomyelitis, Polyurethanes, Silver, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Tissue Scaffolds
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Osteomyelitis, a common and debilitating invasive infection of bone, is a frequent complication following orthopedic surgery and causes pathologic destruction of skeletal tissues. Bone destruction during osteomyelitis results in necrotic tissue, which is poorly penetrated by antibiotics and can serve as a nidus for relapsing infection. Osteomyelitis therefore frequently necessitates surgical debridement procedures, which provide a unique opportunity for targeted delivery of antimicrobial and adjunctive therapies. Areas covered: Following surgical debridement, tissue voids require implanted materials to facilitate the healing process. Antibiotic-loaded, non-biodegradable implants have been the standard of care. However, a new generation of biodegradable, osteoconductive materials are being developed. Additionally, in the face of widespread antimicrobial resistance, alternative therapies to traditional antibiotic regimens are being investigated, including bone targeting compounds, antimicrobial surface modifications of orthopedic implants, and anti-virulence strategies. Expert commentary: Recent advances in biodegradable drug delivery scaffolds make this technology an attractive alternative to traditional techniques for orthopedic infection that require secondary operations for removal. Advances in novel treatment methods are expanding the arsenal of viable antimicrobial treatment strategies in the face of widespread drug resistance. Despite a need for large scale clinical investigations, these strategies offer hope for future treatment of this difficult invasive disease.
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14 MeSH Terms
Injectable and compression-resistant low-viscosity polymer/ceramic composite carriers for rhBMP-2 in a rabbit model of posterolateral fusion: a pilot study.
Shiels SM, Talley AD, McGough MAP, Zienkiewicz KJ, Kalpakci K, Shimko D, Guelcher SA, Wenke JC
(2017) J Orthop Surg Res 12: 107
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2, Bone Transplantation, Ceramics, Feasibility Studies, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Pilot Projects, Polyurethanes, Rabbits, Recombinant Proteins, Spinal Fusion, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
BACKGROUND - The challenging biological and mechanical environment of posterolateral fusion (PLF) requires a carrier that spans the transverse processes and resists the compressive forces of the posterior musculature. The less traumatic posterolateral approach enabled by minimally invasive surgical techniques has prompted investigations into alternative rhBMP-2 carriers that are injectable, settable, and compression-resistant. In this pilot study, we investigated injectable low-viscosity (LV) polymer/composite bone grafts as compression-resistant carriers for rhBMP-2 in a single-level rabbit PLF model.
METHODS - LV grafts were augmented with ceramic microparticles: (1) hydrolytically degradable bioactive glass (BG), or (2) cell-degradable 85% β-tricalcium phosphate/15% hydroxyapatite (CM). Material properties, such as pore size, viscosity, working time, and bulk modulus upon curing, were measured for each LV polymer/ceramic material. An in vivo model of posterolateral fusion in a rabbit was used to assess the grafts' capability to encourage spinal fusion.
RESULTS - These materials maintained a working time between 9.6 and 10.3 min, with a final bulk modulus between 1.2 and 3.1 MPa. The LV polymer/composite bone grafts released 55% of their rhBMP-2 over a 14-day period. As assessed by manual palpation in vivo, fusion was achieved in all (n = 3) animals treated with LV/BG or LV/CM carriers incorporating 430 μg rhBMP-2/ml. Images of μCT and histological sections revealed evidence of bone fusion near the transverse processes.
CONCLUSION - This study highlights the potential of LV grafts as injectable and compression-resistant rhBMP-2 carriers for posterolateral spinal fusion.
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12 MeSH Terms
Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.
Kwakwa KA, Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 247-254
MeSH Terms: Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Collagen, Humans, Models, Biological, Polyurethanes, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Silk, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical.
RECENT FINDINGS - 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.
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11 MeSH Terms
Remodeling of injectable, low-viscosity polymer/ceramic bone grafts in a sheep femoral defect model.
Talley AD, McEnery MA, Kalpakci KN, Zienkiewicz KJ, Shimko DA, Guelcher SA
(2017) J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 105: 2333-2343
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Remodeling, Bone Substitutes, Ceramics, Femur, Polyesters, Polyurethanes, Sheep
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
Ceramic/polymer composite bone grafts offer the potential advantage of combining the osteoconductivity of ceramic component with the ductility of polymeric component, resulting in a graft that meets many of the desired properties for bone void fillers (BVF). However, the relative contributions of the polymer and ceramic components to bone healing are not well understood. In this study, we compared remodeling of low-viscosity (LV) ceramic/poly(ester urethane) composites to a ceramic BVF control in a sheep femoral condyle plug defect model. LV composites incorporating either ceramic (LV/CM) or allograft bone (LV/A) particles were evaluated. We hypothesized that LV/CM composites which have the advantageous handling properties of injectability, flowability, and settability would heal comparably to the CM control, which was evaluated for up to 2 years to study its long-term degradation properties. Remodeling of LV/CM was comparable to that observed for the CM control, as evidenced by new bone formation on the surface of the ceramic particles. At early time points (4 months), LV/CM composites healed similar to the ceramic clinical control, while LV/A components showed more variable healing due to osteoclast-mediated resorption of the allograft particles. At longer time points (12-15 months), healing of LV/CM composites was more variable due to the nonhomogeneous distribution and lower concentration of the ceramic particles compared to the ceramic clinical control. Resorption of the ceramic particles was almost complete at 2 years. This study highlights the importance of optimizing the loading and distribution of ceramic particles in polymer/ceramic composites to maximize bone healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2333-2343, 2017.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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8 MeSH Terms
Effects of Repeated Anesthesia Containing Urethane on Tumor Formation and Health Scores in Male C57BL/6J Mice.
Rex TS, Boyd K, Apple T, Bricker-Anthony C, Vail K, Wallace J
(2016) J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 55: 295-9
MeSH Terms: Anesthetics, Animals, Carcinogens, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neoplasms, Urethane, Xylazine
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Repeated injection of urethane (ethyl carbamate) is carcinogenic in susceptible strains of mice. Most recent cancer studies involving urethane-induced tumor formation use p53(+/-) mice, which lack one copy of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, the same protocol elicits at most a single tumor in wildtype C57BL/6 mice. The effect of repeatedly injecting urethane as a component of a ketamine-xylazine anesthetic mixture in the highly prevalent mouse strain C57BL/6 is unknown. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 30; age, 3 mo) were anesthetized once monthly for 4 mo by using 560 mg/kg urethane, 28 mg/kg ketamine, and 5.6 mg/kg xylazine. The physical health of the mice was evaluated according to 2 published scoring systems. The average body condition score (scale, 1 to 5; normal, 3) was 3.3, 3.3, and 3.4 after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th injections, respectively. The visual assessment score was 0 (that is, normal) at all time points examined. Within 1 wk after the 4th injection, the mice were euthanized, necropsied, and evaluated histopathologically. No histopathologic findings were noteworthy. We conclude that repeated monthly injection with urethane as a component of an anesthetic cocktail does not cause clinically detectable abnormalities or induce neoplasia in C57BL/6J mice. These findings are important because urethane combined with low-dose ketamine, unlike other anesthetic regimens, allows for accurate recording of neuronal activity in both the brain and retina. Longitudinal neuronal recordings minimize the number of mice needed and improve the analysis of disease progression and potential therapeutic interventions.
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Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.
Thayer PS, Verbridge SS, Dahlgren LA, Kakar S, Guelcher SA, Goldstein AS
(2016) J Biomed Mater Res A 104: 1894-901
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Shape, Collagen, DNA, Elastic Modulus, Ligaments, Male, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Polyesters, Polyurethanes, RNA, Messenger, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Stress, Mechanical, Tissue Engineering
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Novel behavior of the chromatographic separation of linear and cyclic polymers.
Montenegro-Burke JR, Bennett JM, McLean JA, Hercules DM
(2016) Anal Bioanal Chem 408: 677-81
MeSH Terms: Chromatography, Gel, Mass Spectrometry, Molecular Structure, Polyesters, Polyurethanes
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
In various polymerization processes, the formation of a wide variety of chains, not only in length but also in chemical composition, broadly complicates comprehensive polymer characterization. In this communication, we compare different stationary and mobile phases for the analysis of complex polymer mixtures via size-exclusion chromatography-mass spectrometry (SEC-MS). To the best of our knowledge, we report novel chromatographic effects for the separation of linear and cyclic oligomers for polyesters (PE) and polyurethanes (PUR). A complete separation for the different structures was achieved for both polymer types with a single-solvent system (acetonitrile, ACN) and without extensive optimization. Additionally, cyclic species were found to show an inverse elution profile compared to their linear counterparts, suggesting distinct physical properties between species.
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Injected biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds support tissue infiltration and delay wound contraction in a porcine excisional model.
Adolph EJ, Guo R, Pollins AC, Zienkiewicz K, Cardwell N, Davidson JM, Guelcher SA, Nanney LB
(2016) J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 104: 1679-1690
MeSH Terms: Absorbable Implants, Animals, Biodegradable Plastics, Disease Models, Animal, Polyurethanes, Swine, Tissue Scaffolds, Wound Healing, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
The filling of wound cavities with new tissue is a challenge. We previously reported on the physical properties and wound healing kinetics of prefabricated, gas-blown polyurethane (PUR) scaffolds in rat and porcine excisional wounds. To address the capability of this material to fill complex wound cavities, this study examined the in vitro and in vivo reparative characteristics of injected PUR scaffolds employing a sucrose porogen. Using the porcine excisional wound model, we compared reparative outcomes to both preformed and injected scaffolds as well as untreated wounds at 9, 13, and 30 days after scaffold placement. Both injected and preformed scaffolds delayed wound contraction by 19% at 9 days and 12% at 13 days compared to nontreated wounds. This stenting effect proved transient since both formulations degraded by day 30. Both types of scaffolds significantly inhibited the undesirable alignment of collagen and fibroblasts through day 13. Injected scaffolds were highly compatible with sentinel cellular events of normal wound repair cell proliferation, apoptosis, and blood vessel density. The present study provides further evidence that either injected or preformed PUR scaffolds facilitate wound healing, support tissue infiltration and matrix production, delay wound contraction, and reduce scarring in a clinically relevant animal model, which underscores their potential utility as a void-filling platform for large cutaneous defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1679-1690, 2016.
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Static and cyclic mechanical loading of mesenchymal stem cells on elastomeric, electrospun polyurethane meshes.
Cardwell RD, Kluge JA, Thayer PS, Guelcher SA, Dahlgren LA, Kaplan DL, Goldstein AS
(2015) J Biomech Eng 137:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Cell Count, Cell Line, Cell Survival, Elasticity, Gene Expression Regulation, Materials Testing, Membrane Proteins, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Polyurethanes, Stress, Mechanical, Surface Properties, Tenascin, Tensile Strength, Weight-Bearing
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
Biomaterial substrates composed of semi-aligned electrospun fibers are attractive supports for the regeneration of connective tissues because the fibers are durable under cyclic tensile loads and can guide cell adhesion, orientation, and gene expression. Previous studies on supported electrospun substrates have shown that both fiber diameter and mechanical deformation can independently influence cell morphology and gene expression. However, no studies have examined the effect of mechanical deformation and fiber diameter on unsupported meshes. Semi-aligned large (1.75 μm) and small (0.60 μm) diameter fiber meshes were prepared from degradable elastomeric poly(esterurethane urea) (PEUUR) meshes and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Next, unsupported meshes were aligned between custom grips (with the stretch axis oriented parallel to axis of fiber alignment), seeded with C3H10T1/2 cells, and subjected to a static load (50 mN, adjusted daily), a cyclic load (4% strain at 0.25 Hz for 30 min, followed by a static tensile loading of 50 mN, daily), or no load. After 3 days of mechanical stimulation, confocal imaging was used to characterize cell shape, while measurements of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression were used to characterize cell retention on unsupported meshes and expression of the connective tissue phenotype. Mechanical testing confirmed that these materials deform elastically to at least 10%. Cells adhered to unsupported meshes under all conditions and aligned with the direction of fiber orientation. Application of static and cyclic loads increased cell alignment. Cell density and mRNA expression of connective tissue proteins were not statistically different between experimental groups. However, on large diameter fiber meshes, static loading slightly elevated tenomodulin expression relative to the no load group, and tenascin-C and tenomodulin expression relative to the cyclic load group. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining cell adhesion and alignment on semi-aligned fibrous elastomeric substrates under different mechanical conditions. The study confirms that cell morphology is sensitive to the mechanical environment and suggests that expression of select connective tissue genes may be enhanced on large diameter fiber meshes under static tensile loads.
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17 MeSH Terms
Carcinogenesis of urethane: simulation versus experiment.
Lajovic A, Nagy LD, Guengerich FP, Bren U
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 691-701
MeSH Terms: Carcinogenesis, Carcinogens, DNA, Hydrolysis, Quantum Theory, Thermodynamics, Urethane
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The carcinogenesis of urethane (ethyl carbamate), a byproduct of fermentation that is consistently found in various food products, was investigated with a combination of kinetic experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The main objective of the study was to find ΔG(⧧), the activation free energy for the rate-limiting step of the SN2 reaction among the ultimate carcinogen of urethane, vinyl carbamate epoxide (VCE), and different nucleobases of the DNA. In the experimental part, the second-order reaction rate constants for the formation of the main 7-(2-oxoethyl)guanine adduct in aqueous solutions of deoxyguanosine and in DNA were determined. A series of ab initio, density functional theory (DFT), and semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) calculations was then performed to determine the activation barriers for the reaction between VCE and nucleobases methylguanine, methyladenine, and methylcytosine. Effects of hydration were incorporated with the use of the solvent reaction field method of Tomasi and co-workers and the Langevine dipoles model of Florian and Warshel. The computational results for the main adduct were found to be in good agreement with the experiment, thus presenting strong evidence for the validity of the proposed SN2 mechanism. This allowed us to predict the activation barriers of reactions leading to side products for which kinetic experiments have not yet been performed. Our calculations have shown that the main 7-(2-oxoethyl)deoxyguanosine adduct indeed forms preferentially because the emergence of other adducts either proceeds across a significantly higher activation barrier or the geometry of the reaction requires the Watson-Crick pairs of the DNA to be broken. The computational study also considered the questions of stereoselectivity, the ease of the elimination of the leaving group, and the relative contributions of the two possible reaction paths for the formation of the 1,N(2)-ethenodeoxyguanosine adduct.
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7 MeSH Terms