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Serologic Response to Helicobacter pylori Proteins Associated With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Diverse Populations in the United States.
Butt J, Varga MG, Blot WJ, Teras L, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman C, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GYF, Tinker LE, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Hyslop T, Um C, Grodstein F, Song M, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Berndt S, Hildesheim A, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 175-186.e2
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, United States, Virulence, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Previous studies reported an association of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of gastric cancer, and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, these findings have been inconsistent, appear to vary with population characteristics, and may be specific for virulence factor VacA. To more thoroughly evaluate the potential association of H pylori antibodies with CRC risk, we assembled a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations in the United States.
METHODS - We used H pylori multiplex serologic assays to analyze serum samples from 4063 incident cases of CRC, collected before diagnosis, and 4063 matched individuals without CRC (controls) from 10 prospective cohorts for antibody responses to 13 H pylori proteins, including virulence factors VacA and CagA. The association of seropositivity to H pylori proteins, as well as protein-specific antibody level, with odds of CRC was determined by conditional logistic regression.
RESULTS - Overall, 40% of controls and 41% of cases were H pylori-seropositive (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20). H pylori VacA-specific seropositivity was associated with an 11% increased odds of CRC (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.22), and this association was particularly strong among African Americans (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.08-1.95). Additionally, odds of CRC increased with level of VacA antibody in the overall cohort (P = .008) and specifically among African Americans (P = .007).
CONCLUSIONS - In an analysis of a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations, we found serologic responses to H pylori VacA to associate with increased risk of CRC risk, particularly for African Americans. Future studies should seek to understand whether this marker is related to virulent H pylori strains carried in these populations.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Neurological symptoms in Hypophosphatasia.
Colazo JM, Hu JR, Dahir KM, Simmons JH
(2019) Osteoporos Int 30: 469-480
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Alkaline Phosphatase, Child, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Hypophosphatasia, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Nervous System Diseases, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, United States, Vitamin B 6, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2019
Hypophosphatasia (HPP) typically manifests with fractures, tooth loss, and muscle pain. Although mental health diagnoses and neurological symptoms have not been previously well documented in HPP, they occur commonly. The recognition of non-traditional symptoms may improve patient satisfaction, preempt costly evaluation and misdiagnosis, and lead to further treatment options.
INTRODUCTION - Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism due to deficiency of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). It is traditionally characterized by rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults, along with fractures, tooth loss, and muscle pain. Neurological symptoms and mental health diagnoses have not been widely reported, and we therefore report their prevalence in a cohort of patients with HPP.
METHODS - A retrospective chart review was performed on a series of 82 HPP patients. Patient charts were reviewed to identify the possible presence and onset of 13 common neurological symptoms.
RESULTS - Median age was 36 years (2 to 79). Seventeen had adult onset HPP (> 18 years) and 65 had pediatric onset HPP (< 18 years). Median time from symptom onset to HPP diagnosis was 8 years (0 to 67). Seventy-four percent had a family history of bone disease, while 17% had a family history of neurologic disease. Bone problems occurred in 89%, dental problems in 77%, and muscle problems in 66%. Fatigue occurred in 66%, headache in 61%, sleep disturbance in 51%, gait change in 44%, vertigo in 43%, depression in 39%, anxiety in 35%, neuropathy in 35%, and hearing loss in 33%.
CONCLUSIONS - The extra-skeletal manifestations of HPP, specifically neurological symptoms, have not been previously well documented. However, mental health diagnoses and neurological symptoms such as headache and sleep disturbance occur commonly in patients with HPP. The recognition of non-traditional symptoms in HPP may improve patient satisfaction, preempt costly evaluation and misdiagnosis, and may lead to further treatment options.
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19 MeSH Terms
Relationship between very low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations not due to statin therapy and risk of type 2 diabetes: A US-based cross-sectional observational study using electronic health records.
Feng Q, Wei WQ, Chung CP, Levinson RT, Sundermann AC, Mosley JD, Bastarache L, Ferguson JF, Cox NJ, Roden DM, Denny JC, Linton MF, Edwards DRV, Stein CM
(2018) PLoS Med 15: e1002642
MeSH Terms: Adult, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol, LDL, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Electronic Health Records, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - Observations from statin clinical trials and from Mendelian randomization studies suggest that low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations may be associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite the findings from statin clinical trials and genetic studies, there is little direct evidence implicating low LDL-C concentrations in increased risk of T2DM.
METHODS AND FINDINGS - We used de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to compare the risk of T2DM in a cross-sectional study among individuals with very low (≤60 mg/dl, N = 8,943) and normal (90-130 mg/dl, N = 71,343) LDL-C levels calculated using the Friedewald formula. LDL-C levels associated with statin use, hospitalization, or a serum albumin level < 3 g/dl were excluded. We used a 2-phase approach: in 1/3 of the sample (discovery) we used T2DM phenome-wide association study codes (phecodes) to identify cases and controls, and in the remaining 2/3 (validation) we identified T2DM cases and controls using a validated algorithm. The analysis plan for the validation phase was constructed at the time of the design of that component of the study. The prevalence of T2DM in the very low and normal LDL-C groups was compared using logistic regression with adjustment for age, race, sex, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and duration of care. Secondary analyses included prespecified stratification by sex, race, BMI, and LDL-C level. In the discovery cohort, phecodes related to T2DM were significantly more frequent in the very low LDL-C group. In the validation cohort (N = 33,039 after applying the T2DM algorithm to identify cases and controls), the risk of T2DM was increased in the very low compared to normal LDL-C group (odds ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.80-2.37; P < 2 × 10-16). The findings remained significant in sensitivity analyses. The association between low LDL-C levels and T2DM was significant in males (OR 2.43, 95% CI 2.00-2.95; P < 2 × 10-16) and females (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.42-2.12; P = 6.88 × 10-8); in normal weight (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.59-2.98; P = 1.1× 10-6), overweight (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.65-2.83; P = 1.73× 10-8), and obese (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.65-2.41; P = 8 × 10-13) categories; and in individuals with LDL-C < 40 mg/dl (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.71-3.10; P = 3.01× 10-8) and LDL-C 40-60 mg/dl (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.71-2.32; P < 2.0× 10-16). The association was significant in individuals of European ancestry (OR 2.67, 95% CI 2.25-3.17; P < 2 × 10-16) but not in those of African ancestry (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.81-1.46; P = 0.56). A limitation was that we only compared groups with very low and normal LDL-C levels; also, since this was not an inception cohort, we cannot exclude the possibility of reverse causation.
CONCLUSIONS - Very low LDL-C concentrations occurring in the absence of statin treatment were significantly associated with T2DM risk in a large EHR population; this increased risk was present in both sexes and all BMI categories, and in individuals of European ancestry but not of African ancestry. Longitudinal cohort studies to assess the relationship between very low LDL-C levels not associated with lipid-lowering therapy and risk of developing T2DM will be important.
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16 MeSH Terms
The CeNGEN Project: The Complete Gene Expression Map of an Entire Nervous System.
Hammarlund M, Hobert O, Miller DM, Sestan N
(2018) Neuron 99: 430-433
MeSH Terms: Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Chromosome Mapping, Gene Expression Profiling, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (U.S.), Nervous System, Nervous System Physiological Phenomena, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Differential gene expression defines individual neuron types and determines how each contributes to circuit physiology and responds to injury and disease. The C. elegans Neuronal Gene Expression Map & Network (CeNGEN) will establish a comprehensive gene expression atlas of an entire nervous system at single-neuron resolution.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Metformin use and incidence cancer risk: evidence for a selective protective effect against liver cancer.
Murff HJ, Roumie CL, Greevy RA, Hackstadt AJ, McGowan LED, Hung AM, Grijalva CG, Griffin MR
(2018) Cancer Causes Control 29: 823-832
MeSH Terms: Aged, Carcinoma, Hepatocellular, Female, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Incidence, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Metformin, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Sulfonylurea Compounds, United States, Veterans
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
PURPOSE - Several observational studies suggest that metformin reduces incidence cancer risk; however, many of these studies suffer from time-related biases and several cancer outcomes have not been investigated due to small sample sizes.
METHODS - We constructed a propensity score-matched retrospective cohort of 84,434 veterans newly prescribed metformin or a sulfonylurea as monotherapy. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to assess the association between metformin use compared to sulfonylurea use and incidence cancer risk for 10 solid tumors. We adjusted for clinical covariates including hemoglobin A1C, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications, and body mass index. Incidence cancers were defined by ICD-9-CM codes.
RESULTS - Among 42,217 new metformin users and 42,217 matched-new sulfonylurea users, we identified 2,575 incidence cancers. Metformin was inversely associated with liver cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31, 0.64) compared to sulfonylurea. We found no association between metformin use and risk of incidence bladder, breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, lung, pancreatic, prostate, or renal cancer when compared to sulfonylurea use.
CONCLUSIONS - In this large cohort study that accounted for time-related biases, we observed no association between the use of metformin and most cancers; however, we found a strong inverse association between metformin and liver cancer. Randomized trials of metformin for prevention of liver cancer would be useful to verify these observations.
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16 MeSH Terms
Changing patterns of patent ductus arteriosus surgical ligation in the United States.
Reese J, Scott TA, Patrick SW
(2018) Semin Perinatol 42: 253-261
MeSH Terms: Cerebral Intraventricular Hemorrhage, Cross-Sectional Studies, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Enterocolitis, Necrotizing, Female, Humans, Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Very Low Birth Weight, Ligation, Male, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vocal Cord Paralysis
Show Abstract · Added November 26, 2018
Optimal management of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is unclear. One treatment, surgical ligation, is associated with adverse outcomes. We reviewed data from the Kids' Inpatient Database (2000-2012) to determine if PDA ligation rates: (1) changed over time, (2) varied geographically, or (3) influenced surgical complication rates. In 2012, 47,900 infants <1500g birth weight were born in the United States, including 2,800 undergoing PDA ligation (5.9%). Ligation was more likely in infants <1000g (85.9% vs. 46.2%), and associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (59.2% vs. 37.5%), BPD (54.6% vs. 15.2%), severe intraventricular hemorrhage (16.4% vs. 5.3%), and hospital transfer (37.6% vs. 16.4%). Ligation rates peaked in 2006 at 87.4 per 1000 hospital births, dropping to 58.8 in 2012, and were consistently higher in Western states. Infants undergoing ligation were more likely to experience comorbidities. Rates of ligation-associated vocal cord paralysis increased over time (1.2-3.9%); however, mortality decreased (12.4-6.5%). Thus, PDA ligation has become less frequent, although infants being ligated are smaller and more medically complex. Despite increase in some complications, mortality rates improved perhaps reflecting advances in care.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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The use of prescribed opioid analgesics & the risk of serious infections.
Wiese AD, Grijalva CG
(2018) Future Microbiol 13: 849-852
MeSH Terms: Analgesics, Opioid, Humans, Infection, Opioid-Related Disorders, Substance-Related Disorders, United States
Added July 27, 2018
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Interdisciplinary Models for Research and Clinical Endeavors in Genomic Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Musunuru K, Arora P, Cooke JP, Ferguson JF, Hershberger RE, Hickey KT, Lee JM, Lima JAC, Loscalzo J, Pereira NL, Russell MW, Shah SH, Sheikh F, Wang TJ, MacRae CA, American Heart Association Council on Genomic and Precision Medicine; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research; and Stroke Council
(2018) Circ Genom Precis Med 11: e000046
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Biomedical Research, Cardiovascular Diseases, Electronic Health Records, Genomics, Humans, Interdisciplinary Studies, Precision Medicine, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
The completion of the Human Genome Project has unleashed a wealth of human genomics information, but it remains unclear how best to implement this information for the benefit of patients. The standard approach of biomedical research, with researchers pursuing advances in knowledge in the laboratory and, separately, clinicians translating research findings into the clinic as much as decades later, will need to give way to new interdisciplinary models for research in genomic medicine. These models should include scientists and clinicians actively working as teams to study patients and populations recruited in clinical settings and communities to make genomics discoveries-through the combined efforts of data scientists, clinical researchers, epidemiologists, and basic scientists-and to rapidly apply these discoveries in the clinic for the prediction, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The highly publicized US Precision Medicine Initiative, also known as All of Us, is a large-scale program funded by the US National Institutes of Health that will energize these efforts, but several ongoing studies such as the UK Biobank Initiative; the Million Veteran Program; the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network; the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health; and the DiscovEHR collaboration are already providing exemplary models of this kind of interdisciplinary work. In this statement, we outline the opportunities and challenges in broadly implementing new interdisciplinary models in academic medical centers and community settings and bringing the promise of genomics to fruition.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
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Race- and Sex-related Differences in Nephrolithiasis Risk Among Blacks and Whites in the Southern Community Cohort Study.
Hsi RS, Kabagambe EK, Shu X, Han X, Miller NL, Lipworth L
(2018) Urology 118: 36-42
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Cohort Studies, Continental Population Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Calculi, Male, Medicaid, Medicare, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 18, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate race-sex associations with risk among whites and blacks in the southeastern United States. The relationship between race, sex, and kidney stone risk is poorly understood.
METHODS - Participants were 42,136 black and white adults enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study between 2002 and 2009, with no history of kidney stones and receiving Medicare or Medicaid services. Incident kidney stone diagnoses through December 2014 were determined via linkage with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services research files. Hazard ratios (HRs) for associations with race and sex were computed from multivariable Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbid diseases, and dietary intakes.
RESULTS - During 116,931 and 270,917 person-years of follow-up for whites and blacks, respectively, age-adjusted incidence rates (95% confidence interval [CI]) were 5.98 (4.73-7.23) and 4.50 (3.86-5.14) per 1000 person-years for white men and women, respectively, while corresponding rates among blacks were 2.19 (1.71-2.67) and 2.47 (2.19-2.75) per 1000 person-years. Risk was higher among whites compared to blacks (HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.97-2.53). Male sex was significantly associated with risk among whites (HR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.20-1.75), but not among blacks (HR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.75-1.07). Formal tests of interaction by race and sex were statistically significant for all models (P = .01 for fully adjusted model).
CONCLUSION - The association of incident kidney stones with sex differs between whites and blacks. White men have the highest risk, while no difference in risk is observed between black men and women.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Associations of coronary artery calcified plaque density with mortality in type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes Heart Study.
Raffield LM, Cox AJ, Criqui MH, Hsu FC, Terry JG, Xu J, Freedman BI, Carr JJ, Bowden DW
(2018) Cardiovasc Diabetol 17: 67
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Prognosis, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) is strongly predictive of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality, both in general populations and individuals with type 2 diabetes at high risk for CVD. CAC is typically reported as an Agatston score, which is weighted for increased plaque density. However, the role of CAC density in CVD risk prediction, independently and with CAC volume, remains unclear.
METHODS - We examined the role of CAC density in individuals with type 2 diabetes from the family-based Diabetes Heart Study and the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. CAC density was calculated as mass divided by volume, and associations with incident all-cause and CVD mortality [median follow-up 10.2 years European Americans (n = 902, n = 286 deceased), 5.2 years African Americans (n = 552, n = 93 deceased)] were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, independently and in models adjusted for CAC volume.
RESULTS - In European Americans, CAC density, like Agatston score and volume, was consistently associated with increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality (p ≤ 0.002) in models adjusted for age, sex, statin use, total cholesterol, HDL, systolic blood pressure, high blood pressure medication use, and current smoking. However, these associations were no longer significant when models were additionally adjusted for CAC volume. CAC density was not significantly associated with mortality, either alone or adjusted for CAC volume, in African Americans.
CONCLUSIONS - CAC density is not associated with mortality independent from CAC volume in European Americans and African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
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18 MeSH Terms