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Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 activation by Nox1-derived oxidants is required for TNFα receptor endocytosis.
Choi H, Stark RJ, Raja BS, Dikalova A, Lamb FS
(2019) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 316: H1528-H1537
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Thoracic, Cells, Cultured, Endocytosis, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, NADPH Oxidase 1, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I, Signal Transduction, Superoxides, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is closely linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. TNFα activates NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide (O), production extracellularly is required for subsequent signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that is activated by oxidation of associated thioredoxin. The role of ASK1 in Nox1-mediated signaling by TNFα is poorly defined. We hypothesized that ASK1 is required for TNFα receptor endocytosis and subsequent inflammatory TNFα signaling. We employed a knockdown strategy to explore the role of ASK1 in TNFα signaling in VSMCs. siRNA targeting ASK1 had no effect on TNFα-induced extracellular O production. However, siASK1 inhibited receptor endocytosis as well as phosphorylation of two endocytosis-related proteins, dynamin1 and caveolin1. Intracellular O production was subsequently reduced, as were other inflammatory signaling steps including NF-κB activation, IL-6 production, inducible nitric oxide synthase and VCAM expression, and VSMC proliferation. Prolonged exposure to TNFα (24 h) increased tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) subtype 1 and 2 expression, and these effects were also attenuated by siASK1. ASK1 coimmunoprecipitated with both Nox1 and the leucine rich repeat containing 8A anion channel, two essential components of the TNFR1 signaling complex. Activation of ASK1 by autophosphorylation at Thr845 occurs following thioredoxin dissociation, and this requires the presence of Nox1. Thus, Nox1 is part of the multiprotein ASK1 signaling complex. In response to TNFα, ASK1 is activated by Nox1-derived oxidants, and this plays a critical role in translating these ROS into a physiologic response in VSMCs. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) drives dynamin1 and caveolin1 phosphorylation and TNFα receptor endocytosis. ASK1 modulates TNFα-induced NF-κB activation, survival, and proliferation. ASK1 and NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) physically associate in a multiprotein signaling complex. Nox1 is required for TNFα-induced ASK1 activation.
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13 MeSH Terms
Cadherin-11 as a regulator of valve myofibroblast mechanobiology.
Bowler MA, Bersi MR, Ryzhova LM, Jerrell RJ, Parekh A, Merryman WD
(2018) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 315: H1614-H1626
MeSH Terms: Actins, Animals, Aortic Valve, Cadherins, Cells, Cultured, Focal Adhesions, Interleukin-6, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Mice, Myofibroblasts, Protein Binding, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Cadherin-11 (CDH11) is upregulated in a variety of fibrotic diseases, including arthritis and calcific aortic valve disease. Our recent work has identified CDH11 as a potential therapeutic target and shown that treatment with a CDH11 functional blocking antibody can prevent hallmarks of calcific aortic valve disease in mice. The present study investigated the role of CDH11 in regulating the mechanobiological behavior of valvular interstitial cells believed to cause calcification. Aortic valve interstitial cells were harvested from Cdh11, Cdh11, and Cdh11 immortomice. Cells were subjected to inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-6 to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which CDH11 regulates their mechanobiological changes. Histology was performed on aortic valves from Cdh11, Cdh11, and Cdh11 mice to identify key responses to CDH11 deletion in vivo. We showed that CDH11 influences cell behavior through its regulation of contractility and its ability to bind substrates via focal adhesions. We also show that transforming growth factor-β overrides the normal relationship between CDH11 and smooth muscle α-actin to exacerbate the myofibroblast disease phenotype. This phenotypic switch is potentiated through the IL-6 signaling axis and could act as a paracrine mechanism of myofibroblast activation in neighboring aortic valve interstitial cells in a positive feedback loop. These data suggest CDH11 is an important mediator of the myofibroblast phenotype and identify several mechanisms by which it modulates cell behavior. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Cadherin-11 influences valvular interstitial cell contractility by regulating focal adhesions and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Transforming growth factor-β overrides the normal balance between cadherin-11 and smooth muscle α-actin expression to promote a myofibroblast phenotype. Cadherin-11 is necessary for IL-6 and chitinase-3-like protein 1 secretion, and IL-6 promotes contractility. Targeting cadherin-11 could therapeutically influence valvular interstitial cell phenotypes in a multifaceted manner.
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MLKL Requires the Inositol Phosphate Code to Execute Necroptosis.
Dovey CM, Diep J, Clarke BP, Hale AT, McNamara DE, Guo H, Brown NW, Cao JY, Grace CR, Gough PJ, Bertin J, Dixon SJ, Fiedler D, Mocarski ES, Kaiser WJ, Moldoveanu T, York JD, Carette JE
(2018) Mol Cell 70: 936-948.e7
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Cell Death, Colonic Neoplasms, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, HT29 Cells, Herpesvirus 1, Human, Humans, Inositol Phosphates, Jurkat Cells, Mutation, Phosphorylation, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Protein Kinases, Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases, Signal Transduction, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Necroptosis is an important form of lytic cell death triggered by injury and infection, but whether mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) is sufficient to execute this pathway is unknown. In a genetic selection for human cell mutants defective for MLKL-dependent necroptosis, we identified mutations in IPMK and ITPK1, which encode inositol phosphate (IP) kinases that regulate the IP code of soluble molecules. We show that IP kinases are essential for necroptosis triggered by death receptor activation, herpesvirus infection, or a pro-necrotic MLKL mutant. In IP kinase mutant cells, MLKL failed to oligomerize and localize to membranes despite proper receptor-interacting protein kinase-3 (RIPK3)-dependent phosphorylation. We demonstrate that necroptosis requires IP-specific kinase activity and that a highly phosphorylated product, but not a lowly phosphorylated precursor, potently displaces the MLKL auto-inhibitory brace region. These observations reveal control of MLKL-mediated necroptosis by a metabolite and identify a key molecular mechanism underlying regulated cell death.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Cytokine-mediated changes in K channel activity promotes an adaptive Ca response that sustains β-cell insulin secretion during inflammation.
Dickerson MT, Bogart AM, Altman MK, Milian SC, Jordan KL, Dadi PK, Jacobson DA
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 1158
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Calcium, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Interferon-gamma, Interleukin-1beta, Ion Transport, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Potassium, Potassium Channels, Tandem Pore Domain, Primary Cell Culture, RNA, Messenger, Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases, Tissue Culture Techniques, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
Cytokines present during low-grade inflammation contribute to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Cytokine signaling disrupts β-cell glucose-stimulated Ca influx (GSCI) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca ([Ca]) handling, leading to diminished glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, cytokine-mediated changes in ion channel activity that alter β-cell Ca handling remain unknown. Here we investigated the role of K currents in cytokine-mediated β-cell dysfunction. K currents, which control the termination of intracellular Ca ([Ca]) oscillations, were reduced following cytokine exposure. As a consequence, [Ca] and electrical oscillations were accelerated. Cytokine exposure also increased basal islet [Ca] and decreased GSCI. The effect of cytokines on TALK-1 K currents were also examined as TALK-1 mediates K by facilitating [Ca] release. Cytokine exposure decreased KCNK16 transcript abundance and associated TALK-1 protein expression, increasing [Ca] storage while maintaining 2 phase GSCI and GSIS. This adaptive Ca response was absent in TALK-1 KO islets, which exhibited decreased 2 phase GSCI and diminished GSIS. These findings suggest that K and TALK-1 currents play important roles in altered β-cell Ca handling and electrical activity during low-grade inflammation. These results also reveal that a cytokine-mediated reduction in TALK-1 serves an acute protective role in β-cells by facilitating increased Ca content to maintain GSIS.
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25 MeSH Terms
Real-time imaging of VCAM-1 mRNA in TNF-α activated retinal microvascular endothelial cells using antisense hairpin-DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.
Uddin MI, Jayagopal A, Wong A, McCollum GW, Wright DW, Penn JS
(2018) Nanomedicine 14: 63-71
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Survival, Cells, Cultured, DNA, Antisense, Endothelium, Vascular, Fluorescence, Gold, Metal Nanoparticles, Mice, Molecular Imaging, RNA, Messenger, Retinal Vessels, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2017
Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is an important inflammatory biomarker correlating with retinal disease progression. Thus, detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels at an early disease stage could be an important predictive biomarker to assess the risk of disease progression and monitoring treatment response. We have developed VCAM-1 targeted antisense hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP) for the real time detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels in retinal endothelial cells. The AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP fluorescence enhancement clearly visualized the TNF-α induced cellular VCAM-1 mRNA levels with high signal to noise ratios compared to normal serum treated cells. The scrambled hAuNP probes were minimally detectable under same image acquisition conditions. Intracellular hAuNPs were detected using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the intact cells. In addition, the AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP probes exhibited no acute toxicity to the retinal microvascular endothelial cells as measured by live-dead assay.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
A Two-Biomarker Model Predicts Mortality in the Critically Ill with Sepsis.
Mikacenic C, Price BL, Harju-Baker S, O'Mahony DS, Robinson-Cohen C, Radella F, Hahn WO, Katz R, Christiani DC, Himmelfarb J, Liles WC, Wurfel MM
(2017) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 196: 1004-1011
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Angiopoietins, Biomarkers, Cohort Studies, Critical Illness, Female, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Prospective Studies, Sepsis, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
RATIONALE - Improving the prospective identification of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis at low risk for organ dysfunction and death is a major clinical challenge.
OBJECTIVES - To develop and validate a multibiomarker-based prediction model for 28-day mortality in critically ill patients with SIRS and sepsis.
METHODS - A derivation cohort (n = 888) and internal test cohort (n = 278) were taken from a prospective study of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients meeting two of four SIRS criteria at an academic medical center for whom plasma was obtained within 24 hours. The validation cohort (n = 759) was taken from a prospective cohort enrolled at another academic medical center ICU for whom plasma was obtained within 48 hours. We measured concentrations of angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, IL-6, IL-8, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and soluble Fas.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - We identified a two-biomarker model in the derivation cohort that predicted mortality (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve [AUC], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-0.83). It performed well in the internal test cohort (AUC, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85) and the external validation cohort (AUC, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.72-0.83). We determined a model score threshold demonstrating high negative predictive value (0.95) for death. In addition to a low risk of death, patients below this threshold had shorter ICU length of stay, lower incidence of acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and need for vasopressors.
CONCLUSIONS - We have developed a simple, robust biomarker-based model that identifies patients with SIRS/sepsis at low risk for death and organ dysfunction.
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18 MeSH Terms
The Molecular Basis for the Lack of Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Differentiated Cells.
D'Angelo W, Gurung C, Acharya D, Chen B, Ortolano N, Gama V, Bai F, Guo YL
(2017) J Immunol 198: 2147-2155
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Chikungunya Fever, Chikungunya virus, Embryonic Stem Cells, Immunity, Inflammation, Interferons, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, NF-kappa B, RAW 264.7 Cells, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2017
We reported previously that mouse embryonic stem cells do not have a functional IFN-based antiviral mechanism. The current study extends our investigation to the inflammatory response in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cell-differentiated cells. We demonstrate that LPS, TNF-α, and viral infection, all of which induce robust inflammatory responses in naturally differentiated cells, failed to activate NF-κB, the key transcription factor that mediates inflammatory responses, and were unable to induce the expression of inflammatory genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Similar results were obtained in human embryonic stem cells. In addition to the inactive state of NF-κB, the deficiency in the inflammatory response in mouse embryonic stem cells is also attributed to the lack of functional receptors for LPS and TNF-α. In vitro differentiation can trigger the development of the inflammatory response mechanism, as indicated by the transition of NF-κB from its inactive to active state. However, a limited response to TNF-α and viral infection, but not to LPS, was observed in mouse embryonic stem cell-differentiated fibroblasts. We conclude that the inflammatory response mechanism is not active in mouse embryonic stem cells, and in vitro differentiation promotes only partial development of this mechanism. Together with our previous studies, the findings described in this article demonstrate that embryonic stem cells are fundamentally different from differentiated somatic cells in their innate immunity, which may have important implications in developmental biology, immunology, and embryonic stem cell-based regenerative medicine.
Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation.
Capozzi ME, Hammer SS, McCollum GW, Penn JS
(2016) Sci Rep 6: 39211
MeSH Terms: 8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic Acid, Adamantane, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Down-Regulation, Endothelial Cells, Epoxy Compounds, Fatty Acids, Unsaturated, Humans, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Lauric Acids, Male, Mice, Retinal Vasculitis, Retinal Vessels, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases.
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Metabolic consequences of inflammatory disruption of the blood-brain barrier in an organ-on-chip model of the human neurovascular unit.
Brown JA, Codreanu SG, Shi M, Sherrod SD, Markov DA, Neely MD, Britt CM, Hoilett OS, Reiserer RS, Samson PC, McCawley LJ, Webb DJ, Bowman AB, McLean JA, Wikswo JP
(2016) J Neuroinflammation 13: 306
MeSH Terms: Blood-Brain Barrier, Brain, Claudin-5, Cytokines, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Humans, Interleukin-1beta, Lab-On-A-Chip Devices, Lipopolysaccharides, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Models, Biological, Protein Transport, Tight Junctions, Time Factors, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Zonula Occludens-1 Protein
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
BACKGROUND - Understanding blood-brain barrier responses to inflammatory stimulation (such as lipopolysaccharide mimicking a systemic infection or a cytokine cocktail that could be the result of local or systemic inflammation) is essential to understanding the effect of inflammatory stimulation on the brain. It is through the filter of the blood-brain barrier that the brain responds to outside influences, and the blood-brain barrier is a critical point of failure in neuroinflammation. It is important to note that this interaction is not a static response, but one that evolves over time. While current models have provided invaluable information regarding the interaction between cytokine stimulation, the blood-brain barrier, and the brain, these approaches-whether in vivo or in vitro-have often been only snapshots of this complex web of interactions.
METHODS - We utilize new advances in microfluidics, organs-on-chips, and metabolomics to examine the complex relationship of inflammation and its effects on blood-brain barrier function ex vivo and the metabolic consequences of these responses and repair mechanisms. In this study, we pair a novel dual-chamber, organ-on-chip microfluidic device, the NeuroVascular Unit, with small-volume cytokine detection and mass spectrometry analysis to investigate how the blood-brain barrier responds to two different but overlapping drivers of neuroinflammation, lipopolysaccharide and a cytokine cocktail of IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP1,2.
RESULTS - In this study, we show that (1) during initial exposure to lipopolysaccharide, the blood-brain barrier is compromised as expected, with increased diffusion and reduced presence of tight junctions, but that over time, the barrier is capable of at least partial recovery; (2) a cytokine cocktail also contributes to a loss of barrier function; (3) from this time-dependent cytokine activation, metabolic signature profiles can be obtained for both the brain and vascular sides of the blood-brain barrier model; and (4) collectively, we can use metabolite analysis to identify critical pathways in inflammatory response.
CONCLUSIONS - Taken together, these findings present new data that allow us to study the initial effects of inflammatory stimulation on blood-brain barrier disruption, cytokine activation, and metabolic pathway changes that drive the response and recovery of the barrier during continued inflammatory exposure.
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16 MeSH Terms
LRRC8A channels support TNFα-induced superoxide production by Nox1 which is required for receptor endocytosis.
Choi H, Ettinger N, Rohrbough J, Dikalova A, Nguyen HN, Lamb FS
(2016) Free Radic Biol Med 101: 413-423
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Cyclopentanes, Endocytosis, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Indans, JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Membrane Proteins, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, NADPH Oxidase 1, NF-kappa B, Phosphorylation, Protein Subunits, RNA, Small Interfering, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I, Signal Transduction, Superoxide Dismutase, Superoxides, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 8A (LRRC8A) is a required component of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). In vascular smooth muscle cells, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) activates VRAC via type 1 TNFα receptors (TNFR1), and this requires superoxide (O) production by NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1). VRAC inhibitors suppress the inflammatory response to TNFα by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that LRRC8A directly supports Nox1 activity, providing a link between VRAC current and inflammatory signaling. VRAC inhibition by 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB) impaired NF-κB activation by TNFα. LRRC8A siRNA reduced the magnitude of VRAC and inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activation, iNOS and VCAM expression, and proliferation of VSMCs. Signaling steps disrupted by both siLRRC8A and DCPIB included; extracellular O production by Nox1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and endocytosis of TNFR1. Extracellular superoxide dismutase, but not catalase, selectively inhibited TNFR1 endocytosis and JNK phosphorylation. Thus, O is the critical extracellular oxidant for TNFR signal transduction. Reducing JNK expression (siJNK) increased extracellular O suggesting that JNK provides important negative feedback regulation to Nox1 at the plasma membrane. LRRC8A co-localized by immunostaining, and co-immunoprecipitated with, both Nox1 and its p22phox subunit. LRRC8A is a component of the Nox1 signaling complex. It is required for extracellular O production, which is in turn essential for TNFR1 endocytosis. These data are the first to provide a molecular mechanism for the potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of VRAC inhibition.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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