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Utilization of Cardiac Surveillance Tests in Survivors of Breast Cancer and Lymphoma After Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy.
Ruddy KJ, Sangaralingham LR, Van Houten H, Nowsheen S, Sandhu N, Moslehi J, Neuman H, Jemal A, Haddad TC, Blaes AH, Villarraga HR, Thompson C, Shah ND, Herrmann J
(2020) Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 13: e005984
MeSH Terms: Administrative Claims, Healthcare, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anthracyclines, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Cancer Survivors, Data Warehousing, Echocardiography, Female, Guideline Adherence, Heart Diseases, Humans, Lymphoma, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Predictive Value of Tests, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2020
BACKGROUND - The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend consideration of the use of echocardiography 6 to 12 months after completion of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in at-risk populations. Assessment of BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) has also been suggested by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Failure Society of America for the identification of Stage A (at risk) heart failure patients. The real-world frequency of the use of these tests in patients after receipt of anthracycline therapy, however, has not been studied previously.
METHODS AND RESULTS - In this retrospective study, using administrative claims data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse, we identified 31 447 breast cancer and lymphoma patients (age ≥18 years) who were treated with an anthracycline in the United States between January 1, 2008 and January 31, 2018. Continuous medical and pharmacy coverage was required for at least 6 months before the initial anthracycline dose and 12 months after the final dose. Only 36.1% of patients had any type of cardiac surveillance (echocardiography, BNP, or cardiac imaging) in the year following completion of anthracycline therapy (29.7% echocardiography). Surveillance rate increased from 37.5% in 2008 to 42.7% in 2018 (25.6% in 2008 to 40.5% echocardiography in 2018). Lymphoma patients had a lower likelihood of any surveillance compared with patients with breast cancer (odds ratio, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.74-0.85]; <0.001). Patients with preexisting diagnoses of coronary artery disease and arrhythmia had the highest likelihood of cardiac surveillance (odds ratio, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.39-1.69] and odds ratio, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.3-1.53]; <0.001 for both), although no single comorbidity was associated with a >50% rate of surveillance.
CONCLUSIONS - The majority of survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who have received anthracycline-based chemotherapy do not undergo cardiac surveillance after treatment, including those with a history of cardiovascular comorbidities, such as heart failure.
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Cardiovascular Effects of Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Contemporary Meta-Analyses.
Hu JR, Duncan MS, Morgans AK, Brown JD, Meijers WC, Freiberg MS, Salem JE, Beckman JA, Moslehi JJ
(2020) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 40: e55-e64
MeSH Terms: Androgen Antagonists, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Cardiotoxicity, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiovascular System, Humans, Male, Prostatic Neoplasms, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2020
Androgen deprivation therapy is a cornerstone of prostate cancer treatment. Pharmacological androgen deprivation includes gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonism and antagonism, androgen receptor inhibition, and CYP17 (cytochrome P450 17A1) inhibition. Studies in the past decade have raised concerns about the potential for androgen deprivation therapy to increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular mortality, possibly by exacerbating cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, we summarize existing data on the cardiovascular effects of androgen deprivation therapy. Among the therapies, abiraterone stands out for increasing risk of cardiac events in meta-analyses of both randomized controlled trials and observational studies. We find a divergence between observational studies, which show consistent positive associations between androgen deprivation therapy use and cardiovascular disease, and randomized controlled trials, which do not show these associations reproducibly.
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11 MeSH Terms
Mindfulness-Based Blood Pressure Reduction (MB-BP): Stage 1 single-arm clinical trial.
Loucks EB, Nardi WR, Gutman R, Kronish IM, Saadeh FB, Li Y, Wentz AE, Webb J, Vago DR, Harrison A, Britton WB
(2019) PLoS One 14: e0223095
MeSH Terms: Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Determination, Feasibility Studies, Female, Focus Groups, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hypertension, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Mindfulness, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Qualitative Research, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2020
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Impacts of mindfulness-based programs on blood pressure remain equivocal, possibly because the programs are not adapted to engage with determinants of hypertension, or due to floor effects. Primary objectives were to create a customized Mindfulness-Based Blood Pressure Reduction (MB-BP) program, and to evaluate acceptability, feasibility, and effects on hypothesized proximal self-regulation mechanisms. Secondary outcomes included modifiable determinants of blood pressure (BP), and clinic-assessed systolic blood pressure (SBP).
METHODS - This was a Stage 1 single-arm trial with one year follow-up. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were performed to evaluate acceptability and feasibility. Self-regulation outcomes, and determinants of BP, were assessed using validated questionnaires or objective assessments. The MB-BP curriculum was adapted from Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction to direct participants' mindfulness skills towards modifiable determinants of blood pressure.
RESULTS - Acceptability and feasibility findings showed that of 53 eligible participants, 48 enrolled (91%). Of these, 43 (90%) attended at least 7 of the 10 MB-BP classes; 43 were followed to one year (90%). Focus groups (n = 19) and semi-structured interviews (n = 10) showed all participants viewed the delivery modality favorably, and identified logistic considerations concerning program access as barriers. A priori selected primary self-regulation outcomes showed improvements at one-year follow-up vs. baseline, including attention control (Sustained Attention to Response Task correct no-go score, p<0.001), emotion regulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Score, p = 0.02), and self-awareness (Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness, p<0.001). Several determinants of hypertension were improved in participants not adhering to American Heart Association guidelines at baseline, including physical activity (p = 0.02), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-consistent diet (p<0.001), and alcohol consumption (p<0.001). Findings demonstrated mean 6.1 mmHg reduction in SBP (p = 0.008) at one year follow-up; effects were most pronounced in Stage 2 uncontrolled hypertensives (SBP≥140 mmHg), showing 15.1 mmHg reduction (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION - MB-BP has good acceptability and feasibility, and may engage with self-regulation and behavioral determinants of hypertension.
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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery improves hepatic glucose metabolism and reduces plasma kisspeptin levels in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Flynn CR, Albaugh VL, Tamboli RA, Gregory JM, Bosompem A, Sidani RM, Winnick JJ
(2020) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 318: G370-G374
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucagon, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Kisspeptins, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Morbid, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is known to improve whole-body glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), although the mechanisms are not entirely clear and are likely multifactorial. The aim of this study was to assess fasting hepatic glucose metabolism and other markers of metabolic activity before and after RYGB in patients with and without T2D. Methods: Metabolic characteristics of patients who are obese with T2D were compared with those without the disease (non-T2D) before and 1 and 6 mo after RYGB. Fasting plasma insulin and the insulin:glucagon ratio were markedly reduced as early as 1 mo after RYGB in both patients with T2D and without T2D. Despite this reduction, endogenous glucose production and fasting plasma glucose levels were lower in both groups after RYGB, with the reductions being much larger in T2D. Plasma kisspeptin, an inhibitor of insulin secretion, was reduced only in T2D after surgery. Improved hepatic glucose metabolism and lower plasma kisspeptin in T2D after RYGB may link improved hepatic function with enhanced insulin responsiveness after surgery. Our manuscript is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to present data showing that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) lowers fasting kisspeptin levels in patients who are obese with type 2 diabetes. This lowering of kisspeptin is important because it could link improvements in liver glucose metabolism after RYGB with increased insulin responsiveness also seen after surgery.
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17 MeSH Terms
Phenome-wide association analysis of LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants in PCSK9.
Schmidt AF, Holmes MV, Preiss D, Swerdlow DI, Denaxas S, Fatemifar G, Faraway R, Finan C, Valentine D, Fairhurst-Hunter Z, Hartwig FP, Horta BL, Hypponen E, Power C, Moldovan M, van Iperen E, Hovingh K, Demuth I, Norman K, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Demuth J, Bertram L, Lill CM, Coassin S, Willeit J, Kiechl S, Willeit K, Mason D, Wright J, Morris R, Wanamethee G, Whincup P, Ben-Shlomo Y, McLachlan S, Price JF, Kivimaki M, Welch C, Sanchez-Galvez A, Marques-Vidal P, Nicolaides A, Panayiotou AG, Onland-Moret NC, van der Schouw YT, Matullo G, Fiorito G, Guarrera S, Sacerdote C, Wareham NJ, Langenberg C, Scott RA, Luan J, Bobak M, Malyutina S, Pająk A, Kubinova R, Tamosiunas A, Pikhart H, Grarup N, Pedersen O, Hansen T, Linneberg A, Jess T, Cooper J, Humphries SE, Brilliant M, Kitchner T, Hakonarson H, Carrell DS, McCarty CA, Lester KH, Larson EB, Crosslin DR, de Andrade M, Roden DM, Denny JC, Carty C, Hancock S, Attia J, Holliday E, Scott R, Schofield P, O'Donnell M, Yusuf S, Chong M, Pare G, van der Harst P, Said MA, Eppinga RN, Verweij N, Snieder H, Lifelines Cohort authors, Christen T, Mook-Kanamori DO, ICBP Consortium, Gustafsson S, Lind L, Ingelsson E, Pazoki R, Franco O, Hofman A, Uitterlinden A, Dehghan A, Teumer A, Baumeister S, Dörr M, Lerch MM, Völker U, Völzke H, Ward J, Pell JP, Meade T, Christophersen IE, Maitland-van der Zee AH, Baranova EV, Young R, Ford I, Campbell A, Padmanabhan S, Bots ML, Grobbee DE, Froguel P, Thuillier D, Roussel R, Bonnefond A, Cariou B, Smart M, Bao Y, Kumari M, Mahajan A, Hopewell JC, Seshadri S, METASTROKE Consortium of the ISGC, Dale C, Costa RPE, Ridker PM, Chasman DI, Reiner AP, Ritchie MD, Lange LA, Cornish AJ, Dobbins SE, Hemminki K, Kinnersley B, Sanson M, Labreche K, Simon M, Bondy M, Law P, Speedy H, Allan J, Li N, Went M, Weinhold N, Morgan G, Sonneveld P, Nilsson B, Goldschmidt H, Sud A, Engert A, Hansson M, Hemingway H, Asselbergs FW, Patel RS, Keating BJ, Sattar N, Houlston R, Casas JP, Hingorani AD
(2019) BMC Cardiovasc Disord 19: 240
MeSH Terms: Anticholesteremic Agents, Biomarkers, Brain Ischemia, Cholesterol, LDL, Down-Regulation, Dyslipidemias, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Myocardial Infarction, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Proprotein Convertase 9, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Serine Proteinase Inhibitors, Stroke, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
BACKGROUND - We characterised the phenotypic consequence of genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus and compared findings with recent trials of pharmacological inhibitors of PCSK9.
METHODS - Published and individual participant level data (300,000+ participants) were combined to construct a weighted PCSK9 gene-centric score (GS). Seventeen randomized placebo controlled PCSK9 inhibitor trials were included, providing data on 79,578 participants. Results were scaled to a one mmol/L lower LDL-C concentration.
RESULTS - The PCSK9 GS (comprising 4 SNPs) associations with plasma lipid and apolipoprotein levels were consistent in direction with treatment effects. The GS odds ratio (OR) for myocardial infarction (MI) was 0.53 (95% CI 0.42; 0.68), compared to a PCSK9 inhibitor effect of 0.90 (95% CI 0.86; 0.93). For ischemic stroke ORs were 0.84 (95% CI 0.57; 1.22) for the GS, compared to 0.85 (95% CI 0.78; 0.93) in the drug trials. ORs with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were 1.29 (95% CI 1.11; 1.50) for the GS, as compared to 1.00 (95% CI 0.96; 1.04) for incident T2DM in PCSK9 inhibitor trials. No genetic associations were observed for cancer, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or Alzheimer's disease - outcomes for which large-scale trial data were unavailable.
CONCLUSIONS - Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus recapitulates the effects of therapeutic inhibition of PCSK9 on major blood lipid fractions and MI. While indicating an increased risk of T2DM, no other possible safety concerns were shown; although precision was moderate.
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17 MeSH Terms
is associated with indomethacin treatment failure for patent ductus arteriosus.
Rooney SR, Shelton EL, Aka I, Shaffer CM, Clyman RI, Dagle JM, Ryckman K, Lewis TR, Reese J, Van Driest SL, Kannankeril PJ
(2019) Pharmacogenomics 20: 939-946
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Indomethacin, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Treatment Failure, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
To identify clinical andgenetic factors associated with indomethacin treatment failure in preterm neonates with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). This is a multicenter cohort study of 144 preterm infants (22-32 weeks gestational age) at three centers who received at least one treatment course of indomethacin for PDA. Indomethacin failure was defined as requiring subsequent surgical intervention. In multivariate analysis, gestational age (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.96), surfactant use (AOR 9.77, 95% CI 1.15-83.26), and (AOR 3.74; 95% CI 1.34-10.44) were each associated with indomethacin failure. Age, surfactant use, and influence indomethacin treatment outcome in preterm infants with PDA. This combination of clinical and genetic factors may facilitate targeted indomethacin use for PDA.
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Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Activators in Renal Anemia: Current Clinical Experience.
Sanghani NS, Haase VH
(2019) Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 26: 253-266
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Barbiturates, Glycine, Humans, Isoquinolines, Picolinic Acids, Prolyl-Hydroxylase Inhibitors, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Prolyl hydroxylase domain oxygen sensors are dioxygenases that regulate the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which controls renal and hepatic erythropoietin production and coordinates erythropoiesis with iron metabolism. Small molecule inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylase domain dioxygenases (HIF-PHI [prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor]) stimulate the production of endogenous erythropoietin and improve iron metabolism resulting in efficacious anemia management in patients with CKD. Three oral HIF-PHIs-daprodustat, roxadustat, and vadadustat-have now advanced to global phase III clinical development culminating in the recent licensing of roxadustat for oral anemia therapy in China. Here, we survey current clinical experience with HIF-PHIs, discuss potential therapeutic advantages, and deliberate over safety concerns regarding long-term administration in patients with renal anemia.
Copyright © 2019 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Advanced age adversely affects chronic rhinosinusitis surgical outcomes.
Yancey KL, Lowery AS, Chandra RK, Chowdhury NI, Turner JH
(2019) Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 9: 1125-1134
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Chronic Disease, Endoscopy, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nasal Surgical Procedures, Paranasal Sinuses, Prognosis, Quality of Life, Rhinitis, Sinusitis, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2020
BACKGROUND - Patient-specific and disease-specific factors shape the course of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and its response to treatment, with optimal management involving interventions tailored to these factors. Recent evidence suggests CRS inflammatory signatures depend on age. The objective of this study was to determine whether age also influences quality-of-life (QOL) and postoperative outcomes.
METHODS - Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected QOL data from 403 adults with medically refractory CRS who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) at a tertiary care medical center between 2014 and 2018 was undertaken. Total and subdomain scores from the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) and the Short Form 8 Health Survey (SF-8) measure of general health completed at preoperative and postoperative visits were reviewed.
RESULTS - Patients were divided into young (18 to 39 years, n = 100), middle-aged (40 to 59 years, n = 172), and elderly (≥60 years, n = 131) groups. Baseline total SNOT-22 scores differed between groups (p = 0.01), with middle-aged patients having the highest symptom burden and elderly patients having the lowest. Similar patterns were observed for SNOT-22 subdomains. Elderly patients reported smaller improvements and were less likely to achieve a minimally important clinical difference. CRS patients had worse SF-8 scores compared to the general population, and elderly patients were the least likely to match population norms following surgery. Age was an independent predictor of QOL outcomes after FESS.
CONCLUSION - Age may play a significant role in CRS pathophysiology, symptom burden, and surgical outcomes. Elderly patients report smaller improvements in disease-specific and general health QOL after surgery. CRS management in the elderly population should incorporate age-dependent differences in symptom burden and expectations into treatment algorithms.
© 2019 ARS-AAOA, LLC.
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Myeloablation followed by autologous stem cell transplantation normalises systemic sclerosis molecular signatures.
Assassi S, Wang X, Chen G, Goldmuntz E, Keyes-Elstein L, Ying J, Wallace PK, Turner J, Zheng WJ, Pascual V, Varga J, Hinchcliff ME, Bellocchi C, McSweeney P, Furst DE, Nash RA, Crofford LJ, Welch B, Pinckney A, Mayes MD, Sullivan KM
(2019) Ann Rheum Dis 78: 1371-1378
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cyclophosphamide, Down-Regulation, Female, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Interferons, Male, Middle Aged, Multilevel Analysis, Myeloablative Agonists, Neutrophils, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Scleroderma, Systemic, Transcriptome, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Autologous, Treatment Outcome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
OBJECTIVE - In the randomised scleroderma: Cyclophosphamide Or Transplantation (SCOT trial) (NCT00114530), myeloablation, followed by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), led to improved clinical outcomes compared with monthly cyclophosphamide (CYC) treatment in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Herein, the study aimed to determine global molecular changes at the whole blood transcript and serum protein levels ensuing from HSCT in comparison to intravenous monthly CYC in 62 participants enrolled in the SCOT study.
METHODS - Global transcript studies were performed at pretreatment baseline, 8 months and 26 months postrandomisation using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Levels of 102 proteins were measured in the concomitantly collected serum samples.
RESULTS - At the baseline visit, interferon (IFN) and neutrophil transcript modules were upregulated and the cytotoxic/NK module was downregulated in SSc compared with unaffected controls. A paired comparison of the 26 months to the baseline samples revealed a significant decrease of the IFN and neutrophil modules and an increase in the cytotoxic/NK module in the HSCT arm while there was no significant change in the CYC control arm. Also, a composite score of correlating serum proteins with IFN and neutrophil transcript modules, as well as a multilevel analysis showed significant changes in SSc molecular signatures after HSCT while similar changes were not observed in the CYC arm. Lastly, a decline in the IFN and neutrophil modules was associated with an improvement in pulmonary forced vital capacity and an increase in the cytotoxic/NK module correlated with improvement in skin score.
CONCLUSION - HSCT contrary to conventional treatment leads to a significant 'correction' in disease-related molecular signatures.
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
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19 MeSH Terms
The impact of social determinants of health on laryngotracheal stenosis development and outcomes.
Dang S, Shinn JR, Campbell BR, Garrett G, Wootten C, Gelbard A
(2020) Laryngoscope 130: 1000-1006
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Critical Care, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Laryngoscopy, Laryngostenosis, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Social Determinants of Health, Time Factors, Tracheal Stenosis, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2020
OBJECTIVES - The social determinants of health affect a wide range of health outcomes and risks. To date, there have been no studies evaluating the impact of social determinants of health on laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS). We sought to describe the social determinants in a cohort of LTS patients and explore their association with treatment outcome.
METHODS - Subjects diagnosed with LTS undergoing surgical procedures between 2013 and 2018 were identified. Matched controls were identified from intensive care unit (ICU) patients who underwent intubation for greater than 24 hours. Medical comorbidities, stenosis characteristics, and patient demographics were abstracted from the clinical record. Tracheostomy at last follow-up was recorded from the medical record and phone calls. Socioeconomic data was obtained from the American Community Survey.
RESULTS - One hundred twenty-two cases met inclusion criteria. Cases had significantly lower education compared to Tennessee (P = .009) but similar education rates as ICU controls. Cases had significantly higher body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 1.04, P = .035), duration of intubation (OR: 1.21, P < .001), and tobacco use (OR: 1.21, P = .006) in adjusted analysis when compared to controls. Tracheostomy dependence within the case cohort was significantly associated with public insurance (OR: 1.33, P = .016) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 1.34, P = .018) in adjusted analysis.
CONCLUSION - Intubation practices, medical comorbidities and social determinants of health may influence the development of LTS and tracheostomy dependence after treatment. Identification of at-risk populations in ICUs may allow for prevention of tracheostomy dependence through the use of early tracheostomy and specialized follow-up.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Level 3, retrospective review comparing cases and controls Laryngoscope, 130:1000-1006, 2020.
© 2019 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms