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Reduced-Intensity Conditioning with Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab Is Associated with Improved Outcomes Compared with Fludarabine and Busulfan after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for B Cell Malignancies.
Kennedy VE, Savani BN, Greer JP, Kassim AA, Engelhardt BG, Goodman SA, Sengsayadeth S, Chinratanalab W, Jagasia M
(2016) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 22: 1801-1807
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Busulfan, Calcineurin Inhibitors, Cyclophosphamide, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Leukemia, B-Cell, Methotrexate, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, Rituximab, Survival Analysis, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Homologous, Vidarabine
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2016
Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) has been used increasingly for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to minimize transplant-related mortality while maintaining the graft-versus-tumor effect. In B cell lymphoid malignancies, reduced-intensity regimens containing rituximab, an antiCD20 antibody, have been associated with favorable survival; however, the long-term outcomes of rituximab-containing versus nonrituximab-containing regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in B cell lymphoid malignancies remain to be determined. We retrospectively analyzed 94 patients who received an allogeneic transplant for a B cell lymphoid malignancy. Of these, 33 received RIC with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with a calcineurin inhibitor and mini-methotrexate, and 61 received RIC with fludarabine and busulfan (FluBu) and GVHD prophylaxis with a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil. The 2-year overall survival was superior in patients who received FCR versus FluBu (72.7% versus 54.1%, P = .031), and in multivariable analysis adjusted for Disease Risk Index and donor type, only the conditioning regimen (FluBu versus FCR: HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.04 to 4.08; P = .037) and Disease Risk Index (low versus intermediate/high: HR, .38; 95% CI, .17 to .86; P = .02) were independent predictors of overall survival. The 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was lower in patients who received FCR versus FluBu (24.2% versus 51.7%, P = .01). There was no difference in rate of relapse/progression or acute GVHD. Our results demonstrate that the use of RIC with FCR and GVHD prophylaxis with a calcineurin inhibitor and mini-methotrexate is associated with decreased chronic GVHD and improved overall survival.
Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
How do I manage hyperglycemia/post-transplant diabetes mellitus after allogeneic HSCT.
Fuji S, Rovó A, Ohashi K, Griffith M, Einsele H, Kapp M, Mohty M, Majhail NS, Engelhardt BG, Tichelli A, Savani BN
(2016) Bone Marrow Transplant 51: 1041-9
MeSH Terms: Diabetes Mellitus, Disease Management, Forecasting, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2016
Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients frequently develop glucose intolerance and post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). The clinical importance of PTDM and its detrimental impact on HSCT outcomes are under-recognized. After allo-HSCT, various mechanisms can contribute to the development of PTDM. Here we review information about hyperglycemia and PTDM after allo-HSCT as well as PTDM after solid organ transplantation and describe ways to manage hyperglycemia/PTDM after allogeneic HSCT. Taking into consideration a lack of well-established evidence in the field of allo-HSCT, more studies should be conducted in the future, which will require closer multidisciplinary collaboration between hematologists, endocrinologists and nutritionists.
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7 MeSH Terms
Biocompatible mannosylated endosomal-escape nanoparticles enhance selective delivery of short nucleotide sequences to tumor associated macrophages.
Ortega RA, Barham WJ, Kumar B, Tikhomirov O, McFadden ID, Yull FE, Giorgio TD
(2015) Nanoscale 7: 500-10
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Coculture Techniques, Drug Carriers, Endosomes, Female, Fluorescent Dyes, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Macrophages, Mammary Neoplasms, Animal, Mannose, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Nanoparticles, Ovarian Neoplasms, Polymers, RNA, Small Interfering, Transplantation, Homologous, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2014
Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) can modify the tumor microenvironment to create a pro-tumor niche. Manipulation of the TAM phenotype is a novel, potential therapeutic approach to engage anti-cancer immunity. siRNA is a molecular tool for knockdown of specific mRNAs that is tunable in both strength and duration. The use of siRNA to reprogram TAMs to adopt an immunogenic, anti-tumor phenotype is an attractive alternative to ablation of this cell population. One current difficulty with this approach is that TAMs are difficult to specifically target and transfect. We report here successful utilization of novel mannosylated polymer nanoparticles (MnNP) that are capable of escaping the endosomal compartment to deliver siRNA to TAMs in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with MnNP-siRNA complexes did not significantly decrease TAM cell membrane integrity in culture, nor did it create adverse kidney or liver function in mice, even at repeated doses of 5 mg kg(-1). Furthermore, MnNP effectively delivers labeled nucleotides to TAMs in mice with primary mammary tumors. We also confirmed TAM targeting in the solid tumors disseminated throughout the peritoneum of ovarian tumor bearing mice following injection of fluorescently labeled MnNP-nucleotide complexes into the peritoneum. Finally, we show enhanced uptake of MnNP in lung metastasis associated macrophages compared to untargeted particles when using an intubation delivery method. In summary, we have shown that MnNP specifically and effectively deliver siRNA to TAMs in vivo.
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23 MeSH Terms
Extracorporeal photopheresis as second-line treatment for acute graft-versus-host disease: impact on six-month freedom from treatment failure.
Das-Gupta E, Greinix H, Jacobs R, Zhou L, Savani BN, Engelhardt BG, Kassim A, Worel N, Knobler R, Russell N, Jagasia M
(2014) Haematologica 99: 1746-52
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Adolescent, Adrenal Cortex Hormones, Adult, Aged, Cause of Death, Chronic Disease, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Male, Middle Aged, Photopheresis, Recurrence, Retreatment, Time Factors, Transplantation, Homologous, Treatment Failure, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2016
Second-line therapy for corticosteroid-refractory or -dependent acute graft-versus-host disease remains ill-defined, due to limited efficacy of drugs and evolving clinical trial endpoints. Six-month freedom from treatment failure has been proposed as a novel clinical trial endpoint and is defined by the absence of death, malignancy relapse/progression, or addition of a next line of systemic immunosuppressive therapy within 6 months of intervention and prior to diagnosis of chronic graft-versus-host disease. We analyzed the 6-month freedom from treatment failure endpoint in 128 patients enrolled from three centers who were treated with extracorporeal photopheresis as second-line therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease. The incidence of 6-month freedom from treatment failure was 77.3% with a 2-year survival rate of 56%. Corticosteroid dose or response status at onset of second-line therapy did not influence outcome. Higher grade of acute graft-versus-host disease (grade 2 versus grades 3-4) at onset of photopheresis predicted for poor outcome as measured by survival (hazard ratio 2.78, P<0.001), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 2.78, P=0.001) and 6-month freedom from treatment failure (hazard ratio 3.05, P<0.001). For the 91 patients who achieved 6-month freedom from treatment failure, 1-year, 2-year and 3-year survival rates were 78.9%, 70.8% and 69.5%, respectively. Six-month freedom from treatment failure is a reasonable early surrogate for outcome and should be considered as a clinical trial endpoint. This study demonstrates the durable effect of photopheresis as second-line therapy for corticosteroid-refractory or -dependent acute graft-versus-host disease using 6-month freedom from treatment failure as the primary endpoint.
Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.
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22 MeSH Terms
The outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for children with FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication-positive acute myelogenous leukemia.
Schechter T, Gassas A, Chen H, Pollard J, Meshinchi S, Zaidman I, Hitzler J, Abdelhaleem M, Ho R, Domm J, Woolfrey A, Frangoul H
(2015) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 21: 172-5
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosome Duplication, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, Male, Myeloablative Agonists, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Siblings, Survival Analysis, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Homologous, Treatment Outcome, Unrelated Donors, Whole-Body Irradiation, Young Adult, fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2015
FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) internal tandem duplication (ITD) is a somatic mutation associated with poor outcome when treated with chemotherapy alone. In children, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is recommended, but very limited data on outcome are reported. We determined the outcome of 29 children with FLT3/ITD-positive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who underwent allogeneic HSCT in 4 pediatric centers. Eleven patients (38%) received matched related donor hematopoietic stem cells and 18 (62%) received alternative donors. Eighteen patients (62%) received total body irradiation (TBI)-based regimens. No patients experienced transplantation-related mortality. Eleven patients (38%) experienced relapsed disease. The cumulative incidence of relapse at 2 years was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.4% to 54.9%). Two-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 65.3% (95% CI, 45.1% to 79.6%) and 82.2% (95% CI, 58.5% to 91.3%), respectively. There was no difference in the DFS of patients who received transplants from related donors versus the DFS of those who received transplants from alternative donors (hazard ratio [HR], 2.64; 95% CI, .79 to 8.76; P = .10), using univariate analysis. Patients with higher FLT3/ITD ratio at diagnosis had significantly worse DFS (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.93; P = .03). The use of TBI in the preparative regimen was associated with superior DFS (HR, .29; 95% CI, .08 to .99; P = .04) and OS (HR, .07; 95% CI, .01 to .62; P = .002). We conclude that allogeneic HSCT improves DFS and OS in children with FLT3/ITD-positive AML compared with what has been reported in those treated with chemotherapy alone.
Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Antibody-functionalized peptidic membranes for neutralization of allogeneic skin antigen-presenting cells.
Wen Y, Liu W, Bagia C, Zhang S, Bai M, Janjic JM, Giannoukakis N, Gawalt ES, Meng WS
(2014) Acta Biomater 10: 4759-4767
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antibodies, Antigen-Presenting Cells, Cell Membrane, Computer Systems, Emulsions, Female, Graft Rejection, Immobilized Proteins, Immunoglobulin G, Interferon-gamma, Lymph Nodes, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Molecular Sequence Data, Nanoparticles, Neutralization Tests, Peptides, Skin, Skin Transplantation, Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared, T-Lymphocytes, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule (I-A(d)) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with anti-I-A(d) antibodies than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on anti-I-A(d) antibody-loaded membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in allogeneic transplant models.
Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Allotransplantation for patients age ≥40 years with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: encouraging progression-free survival.
McClune BL, Ahn KW, Wang HL, Antin JH, Artz AS, Cahn JY, Deol A, Freytes CO, Hamadani M, Holmberg LA, Jagasia MH, Jakubowski AA, Kharfan-Dabaja MA, Lazarus HM, Miller AM, Olsson R, Pedersen TL, Pidala J, Pulsipher MA, Rowe JM, Saber W, van Besien KW, Waller EK, Aljurf MD, Akpek G, Bacher U, Chao NJ, Chen YB, Cooper BW, Dehn J, de Lima MJ, Hsu JW, Lewis ID, Marks DI, McGuirk J, Cairo MS, Schouten HC, Szer J, Ramanathan M, Savani BN, Seftel M, Socie G, Vij R, Warlick ED, Weisdorf DJ
(2014) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 20: 960-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin, Male, Middle Aged, Survival Analysis, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) disproportionately affects older patients, who do not often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We analyzed Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data on 1248 patients age ≥40 years receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning HCT for aggressive (n = 668) or indolent (n = 580) NHL. Aggressive lymphoma was more frequent in the oldest cohort 49% for age 40 to 54 versus 57% for age 55 to 64 versus 67% for age ≥65; P = .0008). Fewer patients aged ≥65 had previous autografting (26% versus 24% versus 9%; P = .002). Rates of relapse, acute and chronic GVHD, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year post-HCT were similar in the 3 age cohorts (22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19% to 26%] for age 40 to 54, 27% [95% CI, 23% to 31%] for age 55 to 64, and 34% [95% CI, 24% to 44%] for age ≥65. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years was slightly lower in the older cohorts (OS: 54% [95% CI, 50% to 58%] for age 40 to 54; 40% [95% CI, 36% to 44%] for age 55 to 64, and 39% [95% CI, 28% to 50%] for age ≥65; P < .0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant effect of age on the incidence of acute or chronic GVHD or relapse. Age ≥55 years, Karnofsky Performance Status <80, and HLA mismatch adversely affected NRM, PFS, and OS. Disease status at HCT, but not histological subtype, was associated with worse NRM, relapse, PFS, and OS. Even for patients age ≥55 years, OS still approached 40% at 3 years, suggesting that HCT affects long-term remission and remains underused in qualified older patients with NHL.
Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Investigator feedback about the 2005 NIH diagnostic and scoring criteria for chronic GVHD.
Inamoto Y, Jagasia M, Wood WA, Pidala J, Palmer J, Khera N, Weisdorf D, Carpenter PA, Flowers ME, Jacobsohn D, Martin PJ, Lee SJ, Pavletic SZ, Chronic GVHD Consortium
(2014) Bone Marrow Transplant 49: 532-8
MeSH Terms: Chronic Disease, Data Collection, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Severity of Illness Index, Surveys and Questionnaires, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Homologous, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The 2005 National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for chronic GVHD have set standards for reporting. Many questions, however, have arisen regarding their implementation and utilization. To identify perceived areas of controversy, we conducted an international survey on diagnosis and scoring of chronic GVHD. Agreement was observed for 50-83% of the 72 questions in 7 topic areas. There was agreement on the need for modifying criteria in six situations: two or more distinctive manifestations should be enough to diagnose chronic GVHD; symptoms that are not due to chronic GVHD should be scored differently; active disease and fixed deficits should be distinguished; a minimum threshold body surface area of hidebound skin involvement should be required for a skin score of 3; asymptomatic oral lichenoid changes should be considered a score 1; and lung biopsy should be unnecessary to diagnose chronic GVHD in a patient with bronchiolitis obliterans as the only manifestation. The survey also identified 26 points of controversy. Whenever possible, studies should be conducted to confirm the appropriateness of any revisions. In cases where data are not available, clarification of the NIH recommendations by consensus is necessary. This survey should inform future research in the field and revisions of the current consensus criteria.
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10 MeSH Terms
Avascular necrosis of bone after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in children and adolescents.
Li X, Brazauskas R, Wang Z, Al-Seraihy A, Baker KS, Cahn JY, Frangoul HA, Gajewski JL, Hale GA, Hsu JW, Kamble RT, Lazarus HM, Marks DI, Maziarz RT, Savani BN, Shah AJ, Shah N, Sorror ML, Wood WA, Majhail NS
(2014) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 20: 587-92
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Bone and Bones, Case-Control Studies, Child, Chronic Disease, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematologic Neoplasms, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Male, Myeloablative Agonists, Osteonecrosis, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Sex Factors, Time Factors, Transplantation Conditioning, Transplantation, Homologous, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
We conducted a nested case-control study within a cohort of 6244 patients to assess risk factors for avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone in children and adolescents after allogeneic transplantation. Eligible patients were ≤21 years of age, received their first allogeneic transplant between 1990 and 2008 in the United States, and had survived ≥ 6 months from transplantation. Overall, 160 patients with AVN and 478 control subjects matched by year of transplant, length of follow-up and transplant center were identified. Patients and control subjects were confirmed via central review of radiology, pathology, and/or surgical procedure reports. Median time from transplant to diagnosis of AVN was 14 months. On conditional logistic regression, increasing age at transplant (≥5 years), female gender, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were significantly associated with increased risks of AVN. Compared with patients receiving myeloablative regimens for malignant diseases, lower risks of AVN were seen in patients with nonmalignant diseases and those who had received reduced-intensity conditioning regimens for malignant diseases. Children at high risk for AVN include those within the age group where rapid bone growth occurs as well as those who experience exposure to myeloablative conditioning regimens and immunosuppression after hematopoietic cell transplantation for the treatment of GVHD. More research is needed to determine whether screening strategies specifically for patients at high risk for developing AVN with early interventions may mitigate the morbidity associated with this complication.
Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Pulmonary symptoms measured by the national institutes of health lung score predict overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and patient-reported outcomes in chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Palmer J, Williams K, Inamoto Y, Chai X, Martin PJ, Tomas LS, Cutler C, Weisdorf D, Kurland BF, Carpenter PA, Pidala J, Pavletic SZ, Wood W, Jacobsohn D, Arai S, Arora M, Jagasia M, Vogelsang GB, Lee SJ
(2014) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 20: 337-44
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Chronic Disease, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematologic Neoplasms, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Lung, Male, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Patient Outcome Assessment, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Research Design, Respiratory Function Tests, Severity of Illness Index, Survival Analysis, Transplantation, Homologous, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The 2005 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference recommended assessment of lung function in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) by both pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and assessment of pulmonary symptoms. We tested whether pulmonary measures were associated with nonrelapse mortality (NRM), overall survival (OS), and patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Clinician and patient-reported data were collected serially in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Available PFT data were abstracted. Cox regression models were fit for outcomes using a time-varying covariate model for lung function measures and adjusting for patient and transplantation characteristics and nonlung chronic GVHD severity. A total of 1591 visits (496 patients) were used in this analysis. The NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with NRM (P = .02), OS (P = .02), patient-reported symptoms (P < .001) and functional status (P < .001). Worsening of NIH symptom-based lung score over time was associated with higher NRM and lower survival. All other measures were not associated with OS or NRM; although, some were associated with patient-reported lung symptoms. In conclusion, the NIH symptom-based lung symptom score of 0 to 3 is associated with NRM, OS, and PRO measures in patients with chronic GVHD. Worsening of the NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with increased mortality.
Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms