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Results: 1 to 10 of 17

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Lupus-Prone Mice Resist Immune Regulation and Transplant Tolerance Induction.
Stocks BT, Wilhelm AJ, Wilson CS, Marshall AF, Putnam NE, Major AS, Moore DJ
(2016) Am J Transplant 16: 334-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Cells, Cultured, Dendritic Cells, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic, Lupus Nephritis, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred MRL lpr, Mice, Inbred NOD, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Transplantation Tolerance
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2015
The strongly immunogenic environment in autoimmune diseases such as lupus may pose a stringent barrier to transplantation. Despite available murine models of lupus, transplant tolerance in this setting has yet to be fully investigated in highly penetrant genetic models of disease. Such studies are of clear clinical importance because lupus is a transplant indication in which transplanted kidneys have a substantially increased risk of rejection including a role for recurrent nephritis. In the fully penetrant B6.SLE123 mouse, we determined that CD4 T follicular helper and germinal center B cells were significantly expanded compared with healthy controls. We traced this expansion to resistance of effector CD4 T and B cells in B6.SLE123 mice to regulation by either CD4 T regulatory cells (CD4Tregs) or CD8 T regulatory cells (CD8Tregs), despite demonstrating normal function by Tregs in this strain. Finally, we determined that B6.SLE123 mice resist anti-CD45RB-mediated tolerance induction to foreign islet allografts, even in the absence of islet autoimmunity. Overall, B6.SLE123 lupus-prone mice are highly resistant to transplant tolerance induction, which provides a new model of failed tolerance in autoimmunity that may elucidate barriers to clinical transplantation in lupus through further cellular and genetic dissection.
© Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
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17 MeSH Terms
An immunosufficient murine model for the study of human islets.
Zhao G, Moore DJ, Kim JI, Lee KM, O'Connor M, Yang M, Marshall AF, Lei J, Schuetz C, Markmann JF, Deng S
(2014) Xenotransplantation 21: 567-73
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Humans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Heterologous
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2014
For the sake of therapy of diabetes, it is critical to understand human beta cell function in detail in health and disease. Current studies of human beta cell physiology in vivo are mostly limited to immunodeficient mouse models, which possess significant technical limitations. This study aimed to create a new model for the study of human islets through induction of transplant tolerance in immunosufficient mice. B6 diabetic mice were transplanted with human islets and treated with anti-CD45RB. To assess whether anti-CD45RB-induced transplant tolerance requires B cells, B6 recipients received additional anti-CD20 or B6μMT-/- mice were used. For some anti-CD45RB-treated B6μMT-/- mice, additional anti-CD25 mAb was applied at the early or late stage post-transplant. Immunohistology was performed to show the Foxp3 cells in grafted anti-CD45RB/anti-CD20-treated Foxp3-GFP B6 mice. The results showed that anti-CD45RB alone allowed indefinite graft survival in 26.6% of B6 mice, however 100% of xenografts were accepted in mice treated simultaneously with anti-CD20, and 88.9% of xenografts accepted in anti-CD45RB-treated μMT-/- mice. These μMT-/- mice accepted the islets from another human donor but rejected the islets from baboon. Additional administration of anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in 100% rejection, whereas 40% of grafts were rejected while the antibody was administrated at days 60 post-transplant. Immunohistologic examination showed Foxp3+ cells accumulated around grafts. We conclude that induction of tolerance to human islets in an immunosufficient mouse model could be generated by targeting murine CD45RB and CD20. This new system will facilitate study of human islets and accelerate the dissection of the critical mechanisms underlying islet health in human disease.
© 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of transplantation tolerance by immune senescence is reversed by endocrine modulation.
Zhao G, Moore DJ, Kim JI, Lee KM, O'Connor MR, Duff PE, Yang M, Lei J, Markmann JF, Deng S
(2011) Sci Transl Med 3: 87ra52
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Castration, Endocrine System, Gonads, Heart Transplantation, Humans, Immune System, Leukocyte Common Antigens, Leuprolide, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Thymectomy, Thymus Gland, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2013
The senescent immune system responds poorly to new stimuli; thymic involution, accumulation of memory cells against other specificities, and general refractoriness to antigen signaling all may contribute to poor resistance to infection. These same changes may pose a significant clinical barrier to organ transplantation, as transplantation tolerance requires thymic participation and integrated, tolerance-promoting responses to novel antigens. We found that after the age of 12 months, mice became resistant to the tolerance-inducing capacity of the monoclonal antibody therapy anti-CD45RB. This resistance to tolerance to cardiac allografts could be overcome by surgical castration of male mice, a procedure that led to thymic regeneration and long-term graft acceptance. The potential for clinical translation of this endocrine-immune interplay was confirmed by the ability of Lupron Depot injections, which temporarily disrupt gonadal function, to restore tolerance in aged mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the restoration of tolerance after surgical or chemical castration depended on thymic production of regulatory T cells (T(regs)); thymectomy or T(reg) depletion abrogated tolerance restoration. The aging of the immune system ("immune senescence") is a significant barrier to immune tolerance, but this barrier can be overcome by targeting sex steroid production with commonly used clinical therapeutics.
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19 MeSH Terms
Minor histocompatibility antigens: presentation principles, recognition logic and the potential for a healing hand.
Spencer CT, Gilchuk P, Dragovic SM, Joyce S
(2010) Curr Opin Organ Transplant 15: 512-25
MeSH Terms: Animals, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Graft vs Host Disease, Humans, Immunosuppression, Inflammation, Isoantigens, Ligands, Minor Histocompatibility Antigens, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, Structure-Activity Relationship, T-Lymphocytes, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - There is ample evidence indicating a pathologic role for minor histocompatibility antigens in inciting graft-versus-host disease in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched bone marrow transplantation and rejection of solid organ allografts. Here we review the current knowledge of the genetic and biochemical bases for the cause of minor histoincompatibility and the structural basis for the recognition of the resulting alloantigens by the T-cell receptor.
RECENT FINDINGS - Recent evidence indicates that we as independently conceived individuals are genetically unique, thus, offering a mechanism for minor histoincompatibility between MHC-identical donor-recipient pairs. Furthermore, advances in delineating the mechanisms underlying antigen cross-presentation by MHC class I molecules and a critical role for autophagy in presenting cytoplasmic antigens by MHC class II molecules have been made. These new insights coupled with the X-ray crystallographic solution of several peptide/MHC-T-cell receptor structures have revealed mechanisms of histoincompatibility.
SUMMARY - On the basis of these new insights, ways to test for allograft compatibility and concoction of immunotherapies are discussed.
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17 MeSH Terms
Long-term control of alloreactive B cell responses by the suppression of T cell help.
Li Y, Ma L, Yin D, Shen J, Chong AS
(2008) J Immunol 180: 6077-84
MeSH Terms: Animals, B-Lymphocytes, CD40 Ligand, Graft Rejection, Heart Transplantation, Isoantibodies, Lymphocyte Depletion, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Knockout, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, T-Lymphocytes, Time Factors, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Alloantibodies can play a key role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. However, relatively little is known of factors that control B cell responses following allograft tolerance induction. Using 3-83 Igi mice expressing an alloreactive BCR, we recently reported that allograft tolerance was associated with the sustained deletion of the alloreactive B cells at the mature, but not the immature, stage. We have now investigated the basis for the long-term control of alloreactive B cell responses in a non-BCR-transgenic model of C57BL/6 cardiac transplantation into BALB/c recipients treated with anti-CD154 and transfusion of donor-specific spleen cells. We demonstrate that the long-term production of alloreactive Abs by alloreactive B cells is actively regulated in tolerant BALB/c mice through the dominant suppression of T cell help. Deletion of CD25(+) cells resulted in a loss of tolerance and an acquisition of the ability to acutely reject allografts. In contrast, the restoration of alloantibody responses required both the deletion of CD25(+) cells and the reconstitution of alloreactive B cells. Collectively, these data suggest that alloreactive B cell responses in this model of tolerance are controlled by dominant suppression of T cell help as well as the deletion of alloreactive B cells in the periphery.
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15 MeSH Terms
Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes.
Wang T, Chen L, Ahmed E, Ma L, Yin D, Zhou P, Shen J, Xu H, Wang CR, Alegre ML, Chong AS
(2008) J Immunol 180: 5991-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bystander Effect, Graft Rejection, Heart Transplantation, Heat-Shock Proteins, Hemolysin Proteins, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Interferon Type I, Interleukin-1, Interleukin-18, Isoantigens, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeriosis, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Signal Transduction, Skin Transplantation, Toll-Like Receptors, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice via the generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or the induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the perioperative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen because its effects on immune responses are well described. Perioperative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most TLRs, IL-1, and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore former listeriolysin O and on type I IFN receptor signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses independently of the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells.
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24 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions prevents B-cell-dependent anti-CD45RB-induced transplantation tolerance.
Huang X, Moore DJ, Mohiuddin M, Lian MM, Kim JI, Sonawane S, Wang J, Gu Y, Yeh H, Markmann JF, Deng S
(2008) Transplantation 85: 675-80
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, B-Lymphocytes, Flow Cytometry, Heart Transplantation, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Leukocyte Common Antigens, Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Spleen, T-Lymphocytes, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Homologous
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2013
BACKGROUND - Allogeneic tolerance can be reliably obtained with monoclonal antibody therapy targeting CD45RB. Although regulatory T cells play an important role in the mechanism, we have recently demonstrated the active participation of host B lymphocytes. After anti-CD45RB therapy, B lymphocytes demonstrate phenotypic alterations that include up-regulation of CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1). We have investigated the hypothesis that alteration in ICAM-1 expression is required for tolerance induction.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - Recipients of heterotopic allogeneic cardiac grafts (C3H donors into B6 recipients) were treated with anti-CD45RB, anti-ICAM, anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA), or the combination of these agents. These data were extended by performing allogeneic cardiac transplants into ICAM or LFA recipients treated with a 5-day course of anti-CD45RB. Finally, B-cell-deficient animals were reconstituted with ICAM splenocytes to create a recipient with a selective deficiency of ICAM-1 restricted to the B-cell compartment.
RESULTS - Anti-CD45RB alone or the combination of anti-LFA/anti-ICAM reliably induced transplantation tolerance. However, the triple combination was routinely unsuccessful and induced long-term graft survival in no recipients. ICAM-deficient or LFA-deficient recipients were also resistant to tolerance induced by anti-CD45RB. Finally, transfer of control splenocytes to B-cell-deficient recipients permitted anti-CD45RB-induced tolerance, whereas transfer of ICAM cells was unable to support tolerance induction.
CONCLUSIONS - Expression of ICAM-1 by B lymphocytes and interaction with LFA-1 form a central aspect of transplantation tolerance induced by anti-CD45RB therapy. These data further elucidate the cellular mechanisms used by B lymphocytes in the induction of transplantation tolerance.
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16 MeSH Terms
Expression of complement regulatory proteins in accommodated xenografts induced by anti-alpha-Gal IgG1 in a rat-to-mouse model.
Ding JW, Zhou T, Ma L, Yin D, Shen J, Ding CP, Tang IY, Byrne GW, Chong AS
(2008) Am J Transplant 8: 32-40
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Surface, CD59 Antigens, Cells, Cultured, Complement Activation, Immunoglobulin G, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Models, Animal, Rats, Rats, Inbred Lew, Receptors, Cell Surface, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Heterologous, Up-Regulation, alpha-Galactosidase
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Anti-graft antibodies are often associated with graft rejection. Under special conditions, grafts continue to function normally even in the presence of anti-graft antibodies and complement. This condition is termed accommodation. We developed a xenograft accommodation model in which baby Lewis rat hearts are transplanted into Rag/GT-deficient mice, and accommodation is induced by repeated i.v. injections of low-dose anti-alpha-Gal IgG(1). The accommodated grafts survived a bolus dose of anti-alpha-Gal IgG(1), while freshly transplanted second grafts were rejected. To study the mechanism of anti-alpha-Gal IgG(1)-mediated accommodation, both real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed elevated expression of DAF, Crry and CD59 in the accommodated grafts. In vitro exposure of rat endothelial cells to anti-alpha-Gal IgG(1) also induced the up-regulation of DAF, Crry and CD59, as revealed by Western blot analyses, and was associated with an acquired resistance to antibody and complement-mediated lysis in vitro. Collectively, these studies suggest that the up-regulation of complement regulatory proteins may abrogate complement-mediated rejection and permit the development of xenograft accommodation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Progress toward antibody-induced transplantation tolerance.
Moore DJ, Kim JI, Sonawane S, Yeh H, Deng S, Lee K, Markmann JF
(2007) Crit Rev Immunol 27: 167-218
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Graft Rejection, Humans, Transplantation Tolerance
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2013
Transplantation tolerance remains an elusive goal. Despite multiple animal models of tolerance induction using a variety of agents and protocols, it has yet to be achieved in humans with any predictability. In this review, we examine some of the antibodies directed toward T cells that show promise in prolonging graft survival in animal models and in preliminary clinical assessment. Because these antibodies work through multiple pathways, including depletion, downregulation, receptor-ligand blockade, and direct signaling, they have also helped us tease out the various components of long-lived donor-specific tolerance. In particular, we review the role of the thymus in therapies targeted at the peripheral immune system; the importance of the thymus in tolerance induced by anti-CD45RB suggests that central tolerance mechanisms may be more important than previously appreciated.
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5 MeSH Terms
Cutting edge: transplant tolerance induced by anti-CD45RB requires B lymphocytes.
Deng S, Moore DJ, Huang X, Lian MM, Mohiuddin M, Velededeoglu E, Lee MK, Sonawane S, Kim J, Wang J, Chen H, Corfe SA, Paige C, Shlomchik M, Caton A, Markmann JF
(2007) J Immunol 178: 6028-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, B-Lymphocyte Subsets, Cell Communication, Cell Proliferation, Heart Transplantation, Immunophenotyping, Leukocyte Common Antigens, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Transplantation Tolerance
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2013
Selective interference with the CD45RB isoform by mAb (anti-CD45RB) reliably induces donor-specific tolerance. Although previous studies suggest participation of regulatory T cells, a mechanistic understanding of anti-CD45RB-induced tolerance is lacking. We report herein the unexpected finding that tolerance induced by this agent is not established in B cell-deficient mice but can be recovered by preemptive B lymphocyte transfer to B cell-deficient hosts. Using B cells from genetically modified donors to reconstitute B cell-deficient recipients, we evaluate the role of B lymphocyte-expressed CD45RB, T cell costimulatory molecules, and the production of Abs in this novel tolerance mechanism. Our data document an Ab-induced tolerance regimen that is uniquely B lymphocyte-dependent and suggest mechanistic contributions to tolerance development from the B cell compartment through interactions with T cells.
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16 MeSH Terms