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Serum Metabolite Profiles Are Altered by Erlotinib Treatment and the Integrin α1-Null Genotype but Not by Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis.
Mickiewicz B, Shin SY, Pozzi A, Vogel HJ, Clark AL
(2016) J Proteome Res 15: 815-25
MeSH Terms: Animals, ErbB Receptors, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, Female, Integrin alpha1, Male, Menisci, Tibial, Metabolome, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Reactive Oxygen Species, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2016
The risk of developing post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) following joint injury is high. Furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying PTOA and/or identifying novel biomarkers for early detection may help to improve treatment outcomes. Increased expression of integrin α1β1 and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling protect the knee from spontaneous OA; however, the impact of the integrin α1β1/EGFR axis on PTOA is currently unknown. We sought to determine metabolic changes in serum samples collected from wild-type and integrin α1-null mice that underwent surgery to destabilize the medial meniscus and were treated with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Following (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we generated multivariate statistical models that distinguished between the metabolic profiles of erlotinib- versus vehicle-treated mice and the integrin α1-null versus wild-type mouse genotype. Our results show the sex-dependent effects of erlotinib treatment and highlight glutamine as a metabolite that counteracts this treatment. Furthermore, we identified a set of metabolites associated with increased reactive oxygen species production, susceptibility to OA, and regulation of TRP channels in α1-null mice. Our study indicates that systemic pharmacological and genetic factors have a greater effect on serum metabolic profiles than site-specific factors such as surgery.
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13 MeSH Terms
Molecular characterization of larval peripheral thermosensory responses of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae.
Liu C, Zwiebel LJ
(2013) PLoS One 8: e72595
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anopheles, Arthropod Antennae, Female, Gene Expression, Hot Temperature, Humans, Insect Proteins, Insect Vectors, Larva, Locomotion, Organ Specificity, Thermosensing, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Thermosensation provides vital inputs for the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae which utilizes heat-sensitivity within a broad spectrum of behaviors, most notably, the localization of human hosts for blood feeding. In this study, we examine thermosensory behaviors in larval-stage An. gambiae, which as a result of their obligate aquatic habitats and importance for vectorial capacity, represents an opportunistic target for vector control as part of the global campaign to eliminate malaria. As is the case for adults, immature mosquitoes respond differentially to a diverse array of external heat stimuli. In addition, larvae exhibit a striking phenotypic plasticity in thermal-driven behaviors that are established by temperature at which embryonic development occurs. Within this spectrum, RNAi-directed gene-silencing studies provide evidence for the essential role of the Transient Receptor Potential sub-family A1 (TRPA1) channel in mediating larval thermal-induced locomotion and thermal preference within a discrete upper range of ambient temperatures.
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14 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandin metabolite induces inhibition of TRPA1 and channel-dependent nociception.
Weng Y, Batista-Schepman PA, Barabas ME, Harris EQ, Dinsmore TB, Kossyreva EA, Foshage AM, Wang MH, Schwab MJ, Wang VM, Stucky CL, Story GM
(2012) Mol Pain 8: 75
MeSH Terms: Animals, Ganglia, Spinal, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mustard Plant, Nociception, Plant Oils, Prostaglandin D2, Prostaglandins, TRPA1 Cation Channel, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added May 15, 2015
BACKGROUND - The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel TRPA1 is a key player in pain pathways. Irritant chemicals activate ion channel TRPA1 via covalent modification of N-terminal cysteines. We and others have shown that 15-Deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) similarly activates TRPA1 and causes channel-dependent nociception. Paradoxically, 15d-PGJ2 can also be anti-nociceptive in several pain models. Here we hypothesized that activation and subsequent desensitization of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons underlies the anti-nociceptive property of 15d-PGJ2. To investigate this, we utilized a battery of behavioral assays and intracellular Ca2+ imaging in DRG neurons to test if pre-treatment with 15d-PGJ2 inhibited TRPA1 to subsequent stimulation.
RESULTS - Intraplantar pre-injection of 15d-PGJ2, in contrast to mustard oil (AITC), attenuated acute nocifensive responses to subsequent injections of 15d-PGJ2 and AITC, but not capsaicin (CAP). Intraplantar 15d-PGJ2-administered after the induction of inflammation-reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) model for up to 2 h post-injection. The 15d-PGJ2-mediated reduction in mechanical hypersensitivity is dependent on TRPA1, as this effect was absent in TRPA1 knockout mice. Ca2+ imaging studies of DRG neurons demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 pre-exposure reduced the magnitude and number of neuronal responses to AITC, but not CAP. AITC responses were not reduced when neurons were pre-exposed to 15d-PGJ2 combined with HC-030031 (TRPA1 antagonist), demonstrating that inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 depend on TRPA1 activation. Single daily doses of 15d-PGJ2, administered during the course of 4 days in the CFA model, effectively reversed mechanical hypersensitivity without apparent tolerance or toxicity.
CONCLUSIONS - Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that 15d-PGJ2 induces activation followed by persistent inhibition of TRPA1 channels in DRG sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate novel evidence that 15d-PGJ2 is analgesic in mouse models of pain via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our studies support that TRPA1 agonists may be useful as pain therapeutics.
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12 MeSH Terms
Specific roles for DEG/ENaC and TRP channels in touch and thermosensation in C. elegans nociceptors.
Chatzigeorgiou M, Yoo S, Watson JD, Lee WH, Spencer WC, Kindt KS, Hwang SW, Miller DM, Treinin M, Driscoll M, Schafer WR
(2010) Nat Neurosci 13: 861-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Membrane Proteins, Neurons, Nociceptors, Signal Transduction, Sodium Channels, Thermosensing, Touch, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2014
Polymodal nociceptors detect noxious stimuli, including harsh touch, toxic chemicals and extremes of heat and cold. The molecular mechanisms by which nociceptors are able to sense multiple qualitatively distinct stimuli are not well understood. We found that the C. elegans PVD neurons are mulitidendritic nociceptors that respond to harsh touch and cold temperatures. The harsh touch modality specifically required the DEG/ENaC proteins MEC-10 and DEGT-1, which represent putative components of a harsh touch mechanotransduction complex. In contrast, responses to cold required the TRPA-1 channel and were MEC-10 and DEGT-1 independent. Heterologous expression of C. elegans TRPA-1 conferred cold responsiveness to other C. elegans neurons and to mammalian cells, indicating that TRPA-1 is a cold sensor. Our results suggest that C. elegans nociceptors respond to thermal and mechanical stimuli using distinct sets of molecules and identify DEG/ENaC channels as potential receptors for mechanical pain.
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14 MeSH Terms
Anopheles gambiae TRPA1 is a heat-activated channel expressed in thermosensitive sensilla of female antennae.
Wang G, Qiu YT, Lu T, Kwon HW, Pitts RJ, Van Loon JJ, Takken W, Zwiebel LJ
(2009) Eur J Neurosci 30: 967-74
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anopheles, Electrophysiology, Female, Fluorescent Dyes, Hot Temperature, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, Microscopy, Confocal, RNA, Messenger, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sensory Receptor Cells, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Heat sensitivity is a sensory modality that plays a critical role in close-range host-seeking behaviors of adult female Anopheles gambiae, the principal Afrotropical vector for human malaria. An essential step in this activity is the ability to discriminate and respond to increases in environmental temperature gradients through the process of peripheral thermoreception. Here, we report on the characterization of the anopheline homolog of the transient receptor potential (TRP) A1/ANKTM1 channel that is consistent with its role as a heat-sensor in host-seeking adult female mosquitoes. We identify a set of distal antennal sensory structures that specifically respond to temperature gradients and express AgTRPA1. Functional characterization of AgTRPA1 in Xenopus oocytes supports its role in the molecular transduction of temperature gradients in An. gambiae, providing a basis for targeting mosquito heat responses as a means toward reducing malaria transmission.
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15 MeSH Terms
Zebrafish TRPA1 channels are required for chemosensation but not for thermosensation or mechanosensory hair cell function.
Prober DA, Zimmerman S, Myers BR, McDermott BM, Kim SH, Caron S, Rihel J, Solnica-Krezel L, Julius D, Hudspeth AJ, Schier AF
(2008) J Neurosci 28: 10102-10
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Cell Line, Cells, Cultured, Chemoreceptor Cells, Female, Genetic Carrier Screening, Hair Cells, Auditory, Humans, Ion Channels, Larva, Mechanoreceptors, Molecular Sequence Data, Mustard Plant, Mutation, Plant Oils, TRPA1 Cation Channel, Thermoreceptors, Transient Receptor Potential Channels, Xenopus laevis, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added September 24, 2013
Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have been implicated in detecting chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli in organisms ranging from mammals to Caenorhabditis elegans. It is well established that TRPA1 detects and mediates behavioral responses to chemical irritants. However, the role of TRPA1 in detecting thermal and mechanical stimuli is controversial. To further clarify the functions of TRPA1 channels in vertebrates, we analyzed their roles in zebrafish. The two zebrafish TRPA1 paralogs are expressed in sensory neurons and are activated by several chemical irritants in vitro. High-throughput behavioral analyses of trpa1a and trpa1b mutant larvae indicate that TRPA1b is necessary for behavioral responses to these chemical irritants. However, TRPA1 paralogs are not required for behavioral responses to temperature changes or for mechanosensory hair cell function in the inner ear or lateral line. These results support a role for zebrafish TRPA1 in chemical but not thermal or mechanical sensing, and establish a high-throughput system to identify genes and small molecules that modulate chemosensation, thermosensation, and mechanosensation.
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22 MeSH Terms
TRP channels of the pancreatic beta cell.
Jacobson DA, Philipson LH
(2007) Handb Exp Pharmacol : 409-24
MeSH Terms: Animals, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Ion Channels, Neurosecretory Systems, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Orchestrated ion fluctuations within pancreatic islets regulate hormone secretion and maybe essential to processes such as apoptosis. A diverse set of ion channels allows for islet cells to respond to a variety of signals and dynamically regulate hormone secretion and glucose homeostasis (reviewed by Houamed et al. 2004). This chapter focuses on transient receptor potential (TRP)-related channels found within the beta cells of the islet and reviews their roles in both insulin secretion and apoptosis.
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6 MeSH Terms
Intraflagellar transport is required for the vectorial movement of TRPV channels in the ciliary membrane.
Qin H, Burnette DT, Bae YK, Forscher P, Barr MM, Rosenbaum JL
(2005) Curr Biol 15: 1695-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Transport, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Cell Membrane, Cilia, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Ion Channels, Membrane Proteins, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurons, Afferent, TRPP Cation Channels, TRPV Cation Channels, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added August 25, 2017
The membranes of all eukaryotic motile (9 + 2) and immotile primary (9 + 0) cilia harbor channels and receptors involved in sensory transduction (reviewed by). These membrane proteins are transported from the cytoplasm onto the ciliary membrane by vesicles targeted for exocytosis at a point adjacent to the ciliary basal body. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to demonstrate that select GFP-tagged sensory receptors undergo rapid vectorial transport along the entire length of the cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 move in ciliary membranes at rates comparable to the intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery located between the membrane and the underlying axonemal microtubules. OSM-9 motility is disrupted in certain IFT mutant backgrounds. Surprisingly, motility of transient receptor potential polycystin (TRPP) channel PKD-2 (polycystic kidney disease-2), a mechano-receptor, was not detected. Our study demonstrates that IFT, previously shown to be necessary for transport of axonemal components, is also involved in the motility of TRPV membrane protein movement along cilia of C. elegans sensory cells.
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15 MeSH Terms
Reversible phosphorylation of the signal transduction complex in Drosophila photoreceptors.
Liu M, Parker LL, Wadzinski BE, Shieh BH
(2000) J Biol Chem 275: 12194-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Calcium Channels, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Eye Proteins, Insect Proteins, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, Phosphorylation, Photoreceptor Cells, Invertebrate, Protein Kinase C, Signal Transduction, Time Factors, Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
In the Drosophila visual cascade, the transient receptor potential (TRP) calcium channel, phospholipase Cbeta (no-receptor-potential A), and an eye-specific isoform of protein kinase C (eye-PKC) comprise a multimolecular signaling complex via their interaction with the scaffold protein INAD. Previously, we showed that the interaction between INAD and eye-PKC is a prerequisite for deactivation of a light response, suggesting eye-PKC phosphorylates proteins in the complex. To identify substrates of eye-PKC, we immunoprecipitated the complex from head lysates using anti-INAD antibodies and performed in vitro kinase assays. Wild-type immunocomplexes incubated with [(32)P]ATP revealed phosphorylation of TRP and INAD. In contrast, immunocomplexes from inaC mutants missing eye-PKC, displayed no phosphorylation of TRP or INAD. We also investigated protein phosphatases that may be involved in the dephosphorylation of proteins in the complex. Dephosphorylation of TRP and INAD was partially suppressed by the protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid, microcystin, and protein phosphatase inhibitor-2. These phosphatase activities were enriched in the cytosol of wild-type heads, but drastically reduced in extracts prepared from glass mutants, which lack photoreceptors. Our findings indicate that INAD functions as RACK (receptor for activated PKC), allowing eye-PKC to phosphorylate INAD and TRP. Furthermore, dephosphorylation of INAD and TRP is catalyzed by PP1/PP2A-like enzymes preferentially expressed in photoreceptor cells.
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16 MeSH Terms