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3D bone models to study the complex physical and cellular interactions between tumor and the bone microenvironment.
Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2018) J Cell Biochem 119: 5053-5059
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Cellular Microenvironment, Humans, Models, Biological, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
As the complexity of interactions between tumor and its microenvironment has become more evident, a critical need to engineer in vitro models that veritably recapitulate the 3D microenvironment and relevant cell populations has arisen. This need has caused many groups to move away from the traditional 2D, tissue culture plastic paradigms in favor of 3D models with materials that more closely replicate the in vivo milieu. Creating these 3D models remains a difficult endeavor for hard and soft tissues alike as the selection of materials, fabrication processes, and optimal conditions for supporting multiple cell populations makes model development a nontrivial task. Bone tissue in particular is uniquely difficult to model in part because of the limited availability of materials that can accurately capture bone rigidity and architecture, and also due to the dependence of both bone and tumor cell behavior on mechanical signaling. Additionally, the bone is a complex cellular microenvironment with multiple cell types present, including relatively immature, pluripotent cells in the bone marrow. This prospect will focus on the current 3D models in development to more accurately replicate the bone microenvironment, which will help facilitate improved understanding of bone turnover, tumor-bone interactions, and drug response. These studies have demonstrated the importance of accurately modelling the bone microenvironment in order to fully understand signaling and drug response, and the significant effects that model properties such as architecture, rigidity, and dynamic mechanical factors have on tumor and bone cell response.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Fabrication of Trabecular Bone-Templated Tissue-Engineered Constructs by 3D Inkjet Printing.
Vanderburgh JP, Fernando SJ, Merkel AR, Sterling JA, Guelcher SA
(2017) Adv Healthc Mater 6:
MeSH Terms: Biocompatible Materials, Bone Regeneration, Cancellous Bone, Cartilage, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Humans, Materials Testing, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Osteogenesis, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
3D printing enables the creation of scaffolds with precisely controlled morphometric properties for multiple tissue types, including musculoskeletal tissues such as cartilage and bone. Computed tomography (CT) imaging has been combined with 3D printing to fabricate anatomically scaled patient-specific scaffolds for bone regeneration. However, anatomically scaled scaffolds typically lack sufficient resolution to recapitulate the <100 micrometer-scale trabecular architecture essential for investigating the cellular response to the morphometric properties of bone. In this study, it is hypothesized that the architecture of trabecular bone regulates osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. To test this hypothesis, human bone-templated 3D constructs are fabricated via a new micro-CT/3D inkjet printing process. It is shown that this process reproducibly fabricates bone-templated constructs that recapitulate the anatomic site-specific morphometric properties of trabecular bone. A significant correlation is observed between the structure model index (a morphometric parameter related to surface curvature) and the degree of mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells, with more concave surfaces promoting more extensive osteoblast differentiation and mineralization compared to predominately convex surfaces. These findings highlight the significant effects of trabecular architecture on osteoblast function.
© 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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13 MeSH Terms
Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.
Kwakwa KA, Vanderburgh JP, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2017) Curr Osteoporos Rep 15: 247-254
MeSH Terms: Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Collagen, Humans, Models, Biological, Polyurethanes, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Silk, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical.
RECENT FINDINGS - 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.
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11 MeSH Terms
Local Delivery of PHD2 siRNA from ROS-Degradable Scaffolds to Promote Diabetic Wound Healing.
Martin JR, Nelson CE, Gupta MK, Yu F, Sarett SM, Hocking KM, Pollins AC, Nanney LB, Davidson JM, Guelcher SA, Duvall CL
(2016) Adv Healthc Mater 5: 2751-2757
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Diabetes Mellitus, Male, Neovascularization, Physiologic, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, RNA, Small Interfering, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reactive Oxygen Species, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivered from reactive oxygen species-degradable tissue engineering scaffolds promotes diabetic wound healing in rats. Porous poly(thioketal-urethane) scaffolds implanted in diabetic wounds locally deliver siRNA that inhibits the expression of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2, thereby increasing the expression of progrowth genes and increasing vasculature, proliferating cells, and tissue development in diabetic wounds.
© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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13 MeSH Terms
3D Printing of Tissue Engineered Constructs for In Vitro Modeling of Disease Progression and Drug Screening.
Vanderburgh J, Sterling JA, Guelcher SA
(2017) Ann Biomed Eng 45: 164-179
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Culture Techniques, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Humans, Models, Biological, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Tissue Engineering
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
2D cell culture and preclinical animal models have traditionally been implemented for investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms of human disease progression. However, the increasing significance of 3D vs. 2D cell culture has initiated a new era in cell culture research in which 3D in vitro models are emerging as a bridge between traditional 2D cell culture and in vivo animal models. Additive manufacturing (AM, also known as 3D printing), defined as the layer-by-layer fabrication of parts directed by digital information from a 3D computer-aided design file, offers the advantages of simultaneous rapid prototyping and biofunctionalization as well as the precise placement of cells and extracellular matrix with high resolution. In this review, we highlight recent advances in 3D printing of tissue engineered constructs that recapitulate the physical and cellular properties of the tissue microenvironment for investigating mechanisms of disease progression and for screening drugs.
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7 MeSH Terms
Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.
Thayer PS, Verbridge SS, Dahlgren LA, Kakar S, Guelcher SA, Goldstein AS
(2016) J Biomed Mater Res A 104: 1894-901
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Shape, Collagen, DNA, Elastic Modulus, Ligaments, Male, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Polyesters, Polyurethanes, RNA, Messenger, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Stress, Mechanical, Tissue Engineering
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Substrate modulus of 3D-printed scaffolds regulates the regenerative response in subcutaneous implants through the macrophage phenotype and Wnt signaling.
Guo R, Merkel AR, Sterling JA, Davidson JM, Guelcher SA
(2015) Biomaterials 73: 85-95
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Collagen, Down-Regulation, Fibroblasts, Humans, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Kinetics, Macrophages, Male, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Phenotype, Porosity, Pressure, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Regeneration, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway, Wound Healing, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
The growing need for therapies to treat large cutaneous defects has driven recent interest in the design of scaffolds that stimulate regenerative wound healing. While many studies have investigated local delivery of biologics as a restorative approach, an increasing body of evidence highlights the contribution of the mechanical properties of implanted scaffolds to wound healing. In the present study, we designed poly(ester urethane) scaffolds using a templated-Fused Deposition Modeling (t-FDM) process to test the hypothesis that scaffolds with substrate modulus comparable to that of collagen fibers enhance a regenerative versus a fibrotic response. We fabricated t-FDM scaffolds with substrate moduli varying from 5 to 266 MPa to investigate the effects of substrate modulus on healing in a rat subcutaneous implant model. Angiogenesis, cellular infiltration, collagen deposition, and directional variance of collagen fibers were maximized for wounds treated with scaffolds having a substrate modulus (Ks = 24 MPa) comparable to that of collagen fibers. The enhanced regenerative response in these scaffolds was correlated with down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in fibroblasts, as well as increased polarization of macrophages toward the restorative M2 phenotype. These observations highlight the substrate modulus of the scaffold as a key parameter regulating the regenerative versus scarring phenotype in wound healing. Our findings further point to the potential use of scaffolds with substrate moduli tuned to that of the native matrix as a therapeutic approach to improve cutaneous healing.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
MiRNA inhibition in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Beavers KR, Nelson CE, Duvall CL
(2015) Adv Drug Deliv Rev 88: 123-37
MeSH Terms: Bone and Bones, Cicatrix, Genetic Vectors, Humans, Inflammation, Kidney, Liver, MicroRNAs, Muscle, Skeletal, Myocardium, Neovascularization, Pathologic, RNA, Messenger, Regeneration, Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has motivated expanding efforts toward the development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
The relevance and potential roles of microphysiological systems in biology and medicine.
Wikswo JP
(2014) Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 239: 1061-72
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bioprosthesis, Female, Humans, Male, Tissue Engineering
Show Abstract · Added February 2, 2015
Microphysiological systems (MPS), consisting of interacting organs-on-chips or tissue-engineered, 3D organ constructs that use human cells, present an opportunity to bring new tools to biology, medicine, pharmacology, physiology, and toxicology. This issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine describes the ongoing development of MPS that can serve as in-vitro models for bone and cartilage, brain, gastrointestinal tract, lung, liver, microvasculature, reproductive tract, skeletal muscle, and skin. Related topics addressed here are the interconnection of organs-on-chips to support physiologically based pharmacokinetics and drug discovery and screening, and the microscale technologies that regulate stem cell differentiation. The initial motivation for creating MPS was to increase the speed, efficiency, and safety of pharmaceutical development and testing, paying particular regard to the fact that neither monolayer monocultures of immortal or primary cell lines nor animal studies can adequately recapitulate the dynamics of drug-organ, drug-drug, and drug-organ-organ interactions in humans. Other applications include studies of the effect of environmental toxins on humans, identification, characterization, and neutralization of chemical and biological weapons, controlled studies of the microbiome and infectious disease that cannot be conducted in humans, controlled differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into specific adult cellular phenotypes, and studies of the dynamics of metabolism and signaling within and between human organs. The technical challenges are being addressed by many investigators, and in the process, it seems highly likely that significant progress will be made toward providing more physiologically realistic alternatives to monolayer monocultures or whole animal studies. The effectiveness of this effort will be determined in part by how easy the constructs are to use, how well they function, how accurately they recapitulate and report human pharmacology and toxicology, whether they can be generated in large numbers to enable parallel studies, and if their use can be standardized consistent with the practices of regulatory science.
© The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.
1 Communities
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6 MeSH Terms
A porous tissue engineering scaffold selectively degraded by cell-generated reactive oxygen species.
Martin JR, Gupta MK, Page JM, Yu F, Davidson JM, Guelcher SA, Duvall CL
(2014) Biomaterials 35: 3766-76
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biocompatible Materials, Catalysis, Lactic Acid, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Polyglycolic Acid, Polylactic Acid-Polyglycolic Acid Copolymer, Porosity, Rats, Reactive Oxygen Species, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous polyester-based biomaterials and provide a robust, cell-degradable substrate for guiding new tissue formation.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms