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Distinct roles for basal and induced COX-2 in podocyte injury.
Cheng H, Fan X, Guan Y, Moeckel GW, Zent R, Harris RC
(2009) J Am Soc Nephrol 20: 1953-62
MeSH Terms: Albuminuria, Animals, Antibiotics, Antineoplastic, Apoptosis, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Transformed, Cell Survival, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dinoprostone, Doxorubicin, Glomerulonephritis, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Mice, Transgenic, Podocytes, Puromycin, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Thromboxane, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Transgenic mice that overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectively in podocytes are more susceptible to glomerular injury by adriamycin and puromycin (PAN). To investigate the potential roles of COX-2 metabolites, we studied mice with selective deletion of prostanoid receptors and generated conditionally immortalized podocyte lines from mice with either COX-2 deletion or overexpression. Podocytes that overexpressed COX-2 were virtually indistinguishable from wild-type podocytes but were significantly more sensitive to PAN-induced injury, produced more prostaglandin E(2) and thromboxane B(2), and had greater expression of prostaglandin E(2) receptor subtype 4 (EP(4)) and thromboxane receptor (TP). Treatment of COX-2-overexpressing podocytes with a TP antagonist reduced apoptosis, but treatment with an EP(4) antagonist did not. In contrast, podocytes from COX-2-knockout mice exhibited increased apoptosis, markedly decreased cell adhesion, and prominent stress fibers. In vivo, selective deletion of podocyte EP(4) did not alter the increased sensitivity to adriamycin-induced injury observed in mice overexpressing podocyte COX-2. In contrast, genetic deletion of TP in these mice prevented adriamycin-induced injury, with attenuated albuminuria and foot process effacement. These results suggest that basal COX-2 may be important for podocyte survival, but overexpression of podocyte COX-2 increases susceptibility to podocyte injury, which is mediated, in part, by activation of the thromboxane receptor.
2 Communities
3 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of cyclooxygenase with indomethacin phenethylamide reduces atherosclerosis in apoE-null mice.
Burleigh ME, Babaev VR, Patel MB, Crews BC, Remmel RP, Morrow JD, Oates JA, Marnett LJ, Fazio S, Linton MF
(2005) Biochem Pharmacol 70: 334-42
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apolipoproteins E, Arteriosclerosis, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Female, Indomethacin, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Non-selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) has been reported to reduce atherosclerosis in both rabbit and murine models. In contrast, selective inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to suppress early atherosclerosis in LDL-receptor null mice but not more advanced lesions in apoE deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. We investigated the efficacy of the novel COX inhibitor indomethacin phenethylamide (INDO-PA) on the development of different stages of atherosclerotic lesion formation in female apoE(-/-) mice. INDO-PA, which is highly selective for COX-2 in vitro, reduced platelet thromboxane production by 61% in vivo, indicating partial inhibition of COX-1 in vivo. Treatment of female apoE(-/-) mice with 5mg/kg INDO-PA significantly reduced early to intermediate aortic atherosclerotic lesion formation (44 and 53%, respectively) in both the aortic sinus and aorta en face compared to controls. Interestingly, there was no difference in the extent of atherosclerosis in the proximal aorta in apoE(-/-) mice treated from 11 to 21 weeks of age with INDO-PA, yet there was a striking (76%) reduction in lesion size by en face analysis in these mice. These studies demonstrate the ability of non-selective COX inhibition with INDO-PA to reduce early to intermediate atherosclerotic lesion formation in apoE(-/-) mice, supporting a role for anti-inflammatory approaches in the prevention of atherosclerosis.
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13 MeSH Terms
Metabolism of the endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonylglycerol and anandamide, into prostaglandin, thromboxane, and prostacyclin glycerol esters and ethanolamides.
Kozak KR, Crews BC, Morrow JD, Wang LH, Ma YH, Weinander R, Jakobsson PJ, Marnett LJ
(2002) J Biol Chem 277: 44877-85
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Arachidonic Acids, Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators, Cannabinoids, Cattle, Cell Line, Cyclooxygenase 2, Endocannabinoids, Epoprostenol, Esters, Glycerides, Glycerol, Humans, Intramolecular Oxidoreductases, Isoenzymes, Lipocalins, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Molecular Structure, Neurotransmitter Agents, Polyunsaturated Alkamides, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Prostaglandins, Stereoisomerism, Thromboxane-A Synthase, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) action on the endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA), generates prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-G) and ethanolamides (PG-EA), respectively. The diversity of PG-Gs and PG-EAs that can be formed enzymatically following COX-2 oxygenation of endocannabinoids was examined in cellular and subcellular systems. In cellular systems, glycerol esters and ethanolamides of PGE(2), PGD(2), and PGF(2alpha) were major products of the endocannabinoid-derived COX-2 products, PGH(2)-G and PGH(2)-EA. The sequential action of purified COX-2 and thromboxane synthase on AEA and 2-AG provided thromboxane A(2) ethanolamide and glycerol ester, respectively. Similarly, bovine prostacyclin synthase catalyzed the isomerization of the intermediate endoperoxides, PGH(2)-G and PGH(2)-EA, to the corresponding prostacyclin derivatives. Quantification of the efficiency of prostaglandin and thromboxane synthase-directed endoperoxide isomerization demonstrated that PGE, PGD, and PGI synthases catalyze the isomerization of PGH(2)-G at rates approaching those observed with PGH(2). In contrast, thromboxane synthase was far more efficient at catalyzing PGH(2) isomerization than at catalyzing the isomerization of PGH(2)-G. These results define the in vitro diversity of endocannabinoid-derived prostanoids and will permit focused investigations into their production and potential biological actions in vivo.
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27 MeSH Terms
Hepatic cryoablation-induced acute lung injury: pulmonary hemodynamic and permeability effects in a sheep model.
Chapman WC, Debelak JP, Blackwell TS, Gainer KA, Christman JW, Pinson CW, Brigham KL, Parker RE
(2000) Arch Surg 135: 667-72; discussion 672-3
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Proteins, Capillary Permeability, Cryosurgery, Liver, Lymph, NF-kappa B, Pulmonary Artery, Pulmonary Circulation, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Sheep, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
HYPOTHESIS - Hepatic cryoablation of 30% to 35% or more of liver parenchyma in a sheep model results in eicosanoid and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-mediated changes in pulmonary hemodynamics and lung permeability.
SETTING - Laboratory.
INTERVENTIONS - At initial thoracotomy, catheters were placed in the main pulmonary artery, left atrium, right carotid artery, and efferent duct of the caudal mediastinal lymph node for subsequent monitoring in adult sheep. After a 1- to 2-week period of recovery, animals underwent laparotomy and left-lobe cryoablation (approximately 35% by volume) with subsequent awake monitoring and on postoperative days 1 to 3.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - Cryoablation-induced lung permeability and hemodynamic changes were compared with baseline values in sheep that underwent instrumentation. Similarly handled sheep underwent resection of a similar volume of hepatic parenchyma or had pulmonary artery pressure increases induced by mechanical left atrial obstruction. Activation of NF-kappaB was assessed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and serum thromboxane levels were measured with mass spectroscopy.
RESULTS - Cryoablation resulted in acutely increased mean pulmonary (20 to 35 cm water) and systemic pressures, which returned to baseline at 24 hours with no change in cardiac output. Serum thromboxane levels increased 30 minutes after cryoablation (9-fold) and returned to baseline at 24 hours. Activation of NF-kappaB was present in liver and lung tissue by 30 minutes after cryoablation. Lung lymph-plasma protein clearance markedly exceeded the expected increase from pulmonary pressures alone, and increased lymph-plasma protein ratio persisted after pulmonary artery pressures normalized. Similar changes were not associated with 35% hepatic resection.
CONCLUSIONS - This study demonstrates that 35% hepatic cryoablation results in an acute but transient increase in pulmonary artery pressure that may be mediated by increased thromboxane levels. Increases in pulmonary capillary permeability are not accounted for by pressure changes alone, and may be a result of NF-kappaB-mediated inflammatory mechanisms. These data show that cryosurgery causes pathophysiological changes similar to those observed with endotoxin and other systemic inflammatory stimuli.
1 Communities
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12 MeSH Terms
The isoprostanes: novel prostaglandin-like products of the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid.
Liu T, Stern A, Roberts LJ, Morrow JD
(1999) J Biomed Sci 6: 226-35
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonic Acid, Arteriosclerosis, Chemistry Techniques, Analytical, Diabetes Mellitus, Free Radicals, Homocysteine, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Isomerism, Lipid Peroxidation, Oxidative Stress, Prostaglandins, Prostanoic Acids, Smoking, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The isoprostanes (IsoPs) are a unique series of prostaglandin-like compounds formed in vivo from the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding these compounds. Novel aspects of the biochemistry and bioactivity of IsoPs are detailed and methods by which these compounds are analyzed are discussed. A considerable portion of this review deals with the utility of measuring IsoPs as markers of oxidant injury in human diseases particularly in association with risk factors that predispose to atherosclerosis, a condition in which excessive oxidative stress has been causally implicated.
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16 MeSH Terms
Intravascular source of adenosine during forearm ischemia in humans: implications for reactive hyperemia.
Costa F, Sulur P, Angel M, Cavalcante J, Haile V, Christman B, Biaggioni I
(1999) Hypertension 33: 1453-7
MeSH Terms: Adenosine, Adult, Caffeine, Female, Forearm, Humans, Hyperemia, Ischemia, Male, Microdialysis, Muscle, Skeletal, Reference Values, Regional Blood Flow, Substance Withdrawal Syndrome, Thromboxanes, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
It is believed that adenosine is released in ischemic tissues and contributes to reactive hyperemia. We tested this hypothesis in the human forearm using microdialysis to estimate interstitial and intravascular levels of adenosine and caffeine withdrawal to potentiate endogenous adenosine and determine its effect on reactive hyperemia. Forearm blood flow response to ischemia was measured by air plethysmography before and 60 hours after the last dose of caffeine (250 mg TID for 7 days, n=6). Forearm blood flow increased by 274+/-66% and 467+/-97% after 3 minutes of forearm ischemia, before and during caffeine withdrawal, respectively (P<0.05). Thus, caffeine withdrawal enhances reactive hyperemia. To determine the source of adenosine, we measured interstitial adenosine with the use of a microdialysis probe inserted into the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle of the forearm, and we measured intravascular adenosine with the use of a microdialysis probe inserted retrogradely into the medial cubital vein. Dialysate samples were collected at 15-minute intervals during resting, forearm ischemia, and recovery periods. Forearm ischemia failed to increase muscle dialysate concentrations of adenosine but did increase intravascular dialysate adenosine 2.1-fold, from 0.61+/-0.12 to 1.28+/-0.39 micromol/L (P<0.01, n=8). Intravascular dialysate concentrations of thromboxane B2 did not increase during ischemia, ruling out platelet aggregation as a source of adenosine. These results support the hypothesis that endogenous adenosine contributes to reactive hyperemia and indicate that the major source of adenosine in the human forearm is intravascular. We speculate that endothelial cells are the source of intravascular adenosine during ischemia.
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16 MeSH Terms
The isoprostanes: unique bioactive products of lipid peroxidation.
Morrow JD, Roberts LJ
(1997) Prog Lipid Res 36: 1-21
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Dinoprost, F2-Isoprostanes, Free Radicals, Humans, Isomerism, Leukotrienes, Lipid Peroxidation, Oxidative Stress, Prostaglandins, Receptors, Prostaglandin, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The discovery of IsoPs as products of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of free radicals in human physiology and pathophysiology. The quantification of IsoPs as markers of oxidative stress status appears to be an important advance in our ability to explore the role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of human disease. A drawback related to this, however, has been lack of more facile and less expensive methods than mass spectrometry for the measurement of IsoPs. On the other hand, the recent introduction of immunoassay methods for measurement of IsoPs may alleviate this problem, provided they are specific and reliable. If this is the case, immunoassay methodology will most likely lead to an expansion of the use of measurements of IsoPs to assess oxidative stress status in vivo. Another need in the field of free radical medicine is information regarding the clinical pharmacology of antioxidant agents. Because of the evidence implicating free radicals in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, large clinical trials are planned or underway to assess whether antioxidants can either prevent the development or ameliorate the pathology of certain human disorders. However, data regarding the most effective doses and combination of antioxidant agents to use in these clinical trials is lacking. As mentioned previously, administration of antioxidants suppresses the formation of IsoPs, even in normal individuals. Thus, measurement of IsoPs may provide a valuable approach to defining the clinical pharmacology of antioxidants. In addition to being markers of oxidative stress, at least two IsoPs possess potent biological activity. The availability of additional IsoPs in synthetic form should broaden our knowledge concerning the role of these molecules as mediators of oxidant stress. Moreover, information regarding the nature of the receptor(s) that mediate the biological actions of IsoPs will be of considerable importance to the development of specific antagonists or agonists of the biological actions of IsoPs. Despite the fact that considerable information has been obtained since the initial report of the discovery of IsoPs, much remains to be understood about these molecules. With continued research in this area, we believe that much new information will emerge that will open up additional important new areas for future investigation.
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12 MeSH Terms
The effects of ibuprofen on the physiology and survival of patients with sepsis. The Ibuprofen in Sepsis Study Group.
Bernard GR, Wheeler AP, Russell JA, Schein R, Summer WR, Steinberg KP, Fulkerson WJ, Wright PE, Christman BW, Dupont WD, Higgins SB, Swindell BB
(1997) N Engl J Med 336: 912-8
MeSH Terms: Acidosis, Lactic, Double-Blind Method, Epoprostenol, Female, Fever, Hemodynamics, Humans, Ibuprofen, Male, Middle Aged, Oxygen Consumption, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Sepsis, Shock, Survival Rate, Thromboxanes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - In patients with sepsis the production of arachidonic acid metabolites by cyclooxygenase increases, but the pathophysiologic role of these prostaglandins is unclear. In animal models, inhibition of cyclooxygenase by treatment with ibuprofen before the onset of sepsis reduces physiologic abnormalities and improves survival. In pilot studies of patients with sepsis, treatment with ibuprofen led to improvements in gas exchange and airway mechanics.
METHODS - From October 1989 to March 1995, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous ibuprofen (10 mg per kilogram of body weight [maximal dose, 800 mg], given every six hours for eight doses) in 455 patients who had sepsis, defined as fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, and acute failure of at least one organ system.
RESULTS - In the ibuprofen group, but not the placebo group, there were significant declines in urinary levels of prostacyclin and thromboxane, temperature, heart rate, oxygen consumption, and lactic acidosis. With ibuprofen therapy there was no increased incidence of renal dysfunction, gastrointestinal bleeding, or other adverse events. However, treatment with ibuprofen did not reduce the incidence or duration of shock or the acute respiratory distress syndrome and did not significantly improve the rate of survival at 30 days (mortality, 37 percent with ibuprofen vs 40 percent with placebo).
CONCLUSIONS - In patients with sepsis, treatment with ibuprofen reduces levels of prostacyclin and thromboxane and decreases fever, tachycardia, oxygen consumption, and lactic acidosis, but it does not prevent the development of shock or the acute respiratory distress syndrome and does not improve survival.
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2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Antilipid mediator and antioxidant therapy in adult respiratory distress syndrome.
Christman BW, Bernard GR
(1993) New Horiz 1: 623-30
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Adrenal Cortex Hormones, Antioxidants, Clinical Trials as Topic, Disease Models, Animal, Epoprostenol, Humans, Inflammation, Intensive Care Units, Leukotrienes, Lipid Peroxidation, Middle Aged, Platelet Activating Factor, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Thromboxanes, Treatment Failure
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The adult respiratory distress syndrome is now thought to be caused by or complicated by a variety of mediators for which potential antagonists exist. Lung dysfunction could be prevented by antagonists to metabolites of membrane phospholipids. Examples of such metabolites include thromboxane, prostacyclin, leukotrienes, and platelet-activating factor. Oxidant stress can also produce cytotoxicity through membrane lipid peroxidation, as evidenced by the generation of isoprostanes. N-acetylcysteine, by repletion of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione, may represent a novel approach to the therapy of acute lung injury.
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16 MeSH Terms
Metabolism of thromboxane B2 in man. Identification of twenty urinary metabolites.
Roberts LJ, Sweetman BJ, Oates JA
(1981) J Biol Chem 256: 8384-93
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biotransformation, Chromatography, Gas, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Thromboxane B2, Thromboxanes
Added December 10, 2013
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10 MeSH Terms