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Suboptimal inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase 1 by aspirin in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with metabolic syndrome.
Kawai VK, Avalos I, Oeser A, Oates JA, Milne GL, Solus JF, Chung CP, Stein CM
(2014) Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 66: 285-92
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aspirin, Biomarkers, Blood Platelets, C-Reactive Protein, Chi-Square Distribution, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Female, Humans, Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prospective Studies, Thromboxane B2, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Low-dose aspirin prevents platelet aggregation by suppressing thromboxane A2 (TXA2 ) synthesis. However, in some individuals TXA2 suppression by aspirin is impaired, indicating suboptimal inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) by aspirin. Because patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have increased risk of thrombotic events, many receive aspirin; however, the efficacy of aspirin in SLE has not been determined. We examined the hypothesis that aspirin response is impaired in SLE.
METHODS - We assessed the effect of aspirin by measuring concentrations of the stable metabolite of TXA2 , serum thromboxane B2 (sTXB2 ), before and after treatment with daily aspirin (81 mg) for 7 days in 34 patients with SLE and 36 control subjects. The inability to suppress sTXB2 synthesis to <10 ng/ml represents suboptimal inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin.
RESULTS - Aspirin almost completely suppressed sTXB2 in control subjects to median 1.5 ng/ml (interquartile range [IQR] 0.8-2.7) but had less effect in patients with SLE (median 3.1 ng/ml [IQR 2.2-5.3]) (P = 0.002). A suboptimal effect of aspirin was present in 15% (5 of 34) of the patients with SLE but not in control subjects (0 of 36) (P = 0.023). Incomplete responders were more likely to have metabolic syndrome (P = 0.048), obesity (P = 0.048), and higher concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = 0.018).
CONCLUSION - The pharmacologic effect of aspirin is suboptimal in 15% of patients with SLE but in none of the control subjects, and the suboptimal response was associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, and higher CRP concentrations.
Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.
2 Communities
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19 MeSH Terms
Suboptimal inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase-1 by aspirin in metabolic syndrome.
Smith JP, Haddad EV, Taylor MB, Oram D, Blakemore D, Chen Q, Boutaud O, Oates JA
(2012) Hypertension 59: 719-25
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aspirin, Blood Platelets, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Platelet Aggregation, Prospective Studies, Thromboxane B2, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Interindividual variation in the ability of aspirin to inhibit platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) could account for some on-treatment cardiovascular events. Here, we sought to determine whether there are clinical phenotypes that are associated with a suboptimal pharmacological effect of aspirin. In a prospective, 2-week study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (81 mg) on platelet COX-1 in 135 patients with stable coronary artery disease by measuring serum thromboxane B(2) (sTxB(2)) as an indicator of inhibition of platelet COX-1. A nested randomized study compared enteric-coated with immediate-release formulations of aspirin. We found that sTxB(2) was systematically higher among the 83 patients with metabolic syndrome than among the 52 patients without (median: 4.0 versus 3.02 ng/mL; P=0.013). Twelve patients (14%) with metabolic syndrome, but none without metabolic syndrome, had sTxB(2) levels consistent with inadequate inhibition of COX (sTxB(2) ≥13 ng/mL). In linear regression models, metabolic syndrome (but none of its individual components) significantly associated with higher levels of log-transformed sTxB(2) (P=0.006). Higher levels of sTxB(2) associated with greater residual platelet function measured by aggregometry-based methods. Among the randomized subset, sTxB(2) levels were systematically higher among patients receiving enteric-coated aspirin. Last, urinary 11-dehydro thromboxane B(2) did not correlate with sTxB(2), suggesting that the former should not be used to quantitate aspirin's pharmacological effect on platelets. In conclusion, metabolic syndrome, which places patients at high risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events, strongly and uniquely associates with less effective inhibition of platelet COX-1 by aspirin.
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18 MeSH Terms
Study of inhibitors of the PGH synthases for which potency is regulated by the redox state of the enzymes.
Boutaud O, Oates JA
(2010) Methods Mol Biol 644: 67-90
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Animals, Arachidonic Acid, Aspirin, Blood Platelets, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dinoprostone, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Mice, Oxidation-Reduction, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Salicylic Acid, Thromboxane B2
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Aspirin, salicylic acid, and acetaminophen are examples of drugs that inhibit the PGH synthases (cyclooxygenases) with potencies that vary remarkably between different cells. This results from the fact that the inhibitory action of these drugs is regulated by redox cycling of the enzymes, which is determined by the concentration of hydroperoxides in the enzyme proximity. The potency of these drugs is greatest in the presence of low concentrations of hydroperoxides. Accordingly, analysis of the action of these inhibitors requires consideration of assay conditions that take into account the factors that control hydroperoxide concentrations, both in studies with purified enzymes and in cells.
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16 MeSH Terms
Elevated ratio of urinary metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin is associated with adverse cardiovascular events in ADAPT.
Montine TJ, Sonnen JA, Milne G, Baker LD, Breitner JC
(2010) PLoS One 5: e9340
MeSH Terms: 6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Aspirin, Cardiovascular Diseases, Celecoxib, Drug Therapy, Combination, F2-Isoprostanes, Female, Humans, Male, Naproxen, Pyrazoles, Sulfonamides, Thromboxane B2, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
Results from prevention trials, including the Alzheimer's Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT), have fueled discussion about the cardiovascular (CV) risks associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We tested the hypotheses that (i) adverse CV events reported among ADAPT participants (aged 70 years and older) are associated with increased ratio of urine 11-dehydrothromboxane B(2) (Tx-M) to 2'3-donor-6-keto-PGF1 (PGI-M) attributable to NSAID treatments; (ii) coincident use of aspirin (ASA) would attenuate NSAID-induced changes in Tx-M/PGI-M ratio; and (iii) use of NSAIDs and/or ASA would not alter urine or plasma concentrations of F(2)-isoprostanes (IsoPs), in vivo biomarkers of free radical damage. We quantified urine Tx-M and PGI-M, and urine and plasma F(2)-IsoPs from 315 ADAPT participants using stable isotope dilution assays with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and analyzed these data by randomized drug assignment and self-report compliance as well as ASA use. Adverse CV events were significantly associated with higher urine Tx-M/PGI-M ratio, which seemed to derive mainly from lowered PGI-M. Participants taking ASA alone had reduced urine Tx-M/PGI-M compared to no ASA or NSAID; however, participants taking NSAIDs plus ASA did not have reduced urine Tx-M/PGI-M ratio compared to NSAIDs alone. Neither NSAID nor ASA use altered plasma or urine F(2)-IsoPs. These data suggest a possible mechanism for the increased risk of CV events reported in ADAPT participants assigned to NSAIDs, and suggest that the changes in the Tx-M/PGI-M ratio was not substantively mitigated by coincident use of ASA in individuals 70 years or older.
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18 MeSH Terms
Low concentrations of reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes prime thromboxane-dependent human platelet aggregation via p38-MAPK activation.
Bernoud-Hubac N, Alam DA, Lefils J, Davies SS, Amarnath V, Guichardant M, Roberts LJ, Lagarde M
(2009) Biochim Biophys Acta 1791: 307-13
MeSH Terms: Blood Platelets, Blotting, Western, Collagen, Cytosol, Humans, Isoprostanes, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases, Phospholipases A2, Phosphorylation, Platelet Activation, Platelet Aggregation, Prostaglandins E, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Pyridoxamine, Thromboxane B2, Vitamin B Complex
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2013
Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in pathological processes. Isoketals are highly reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes of the isoprostanes pathway of free radical-induced peroxidation of arachidonic acid that are analogous to cyclooxygenase-derived levuglandins. Because aldehydes, that are much less reactive than isoketals, have been shown to trigger platelet activation, we investigated the effect of one isoketal (E(2)-IsoK) on platelet aggregation. Isoketal potentiated aggregation and the formation of thromboxane B(2) in platelets challenged with collagen at a concentration as low as 1 nM. Moreover, the potentiating effect of 1 nM isoketal on collagen-induced platelet aggregation was prevented by pyridoxamine, an effective scavenger of gamma-ketoaldehydes. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in isoketal-mediated platelet priming, suggesting that isoketals may act upstream the activation of collagen-induced cytosolic phospholipase A(2). Additionally, the incubation of platelets with 1 nM isoketal led to the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2). The cytosolic phopholipase A(2) inhibitors AACOCF3 and MAFP both fully prevented the increase in isoketal-mediated platelet aggregation challenged with collagen. These results indicate that isoketals could play an important role in platelet hyperfunction observed in pathological states such as atherosclerosis and thrombosis through the activation of the endogenous arachidonic acid cascade.
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16 MeSH Terms
Hyperacute lung rejection in the pig-to-human model. III. Platelet receptor inhibitors synergistically modulate complement activation and lung injury.
Pfeiffer S, Zorn GL, Zhang JP, Giorgio TD, Robson SC, Azimzadeh AM, Pierson RN
(2003) Transplantation 75: 953-9
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Animals, Aurintricarboxylic Acid, Blood Physiological Phenomena, Blood Platelets, Complement Activation, Dipeptides, Drug Synergism, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Hematocrit, Histamine, Humans, Lung, Lung Transplantation, Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex, Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Swine, Thrombin, Thromboxane B2, Transplantation, Heterologous
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
BACKGROUND - The influence of platelet von Willebrand factor (vWF)-glycoprotein (GP)Ib-V-IX and GPIIb-IIIa receptor interactions in the context of hyperacute rejection (HAR) of pulmonary xenografts has not previously been explored.
METHODS - Aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA, an inhibitor of platelet-GPIb interactions with vWF), SC52012A (SC, a synthetic GPIIb/IIIa inhibiting peptide), or both were added to heparinized whole human blood before perfusion of isolated piglet lungs. Results were compared with unmodified blood ("unmodified").
RESULTS - Perfusion of porcine lungs with unmodified human blood resulted in an immediate rise in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), fluid and platelet sequestration in the lung, and, without exception, cessation of function within 15 minutes with a mean survival of 8 minutes. Addition of ATA or SC before lung perfusion significantly decreased the rise in PVR, diminished histamine release, and prolonged survival to 31+/-11 and 31+/-22 minutes, respectively. When the therapies were combined, mean survival was 156+/-77 minutes (P<0.05 vs. either monotherapy). Complement activation was synergistically attenuated only when the drugs were used together.
CONCLUSIONS - Platelet protein receptor adhesive interactions play an important role in amplification of complement activation during hyperacute lung rejection. Inhibiting recruitment of platelets at the site of initial immunologic injury to endothelial cells may protect porcine organs against thrombosis and inflammation during the initial exposure to human blood.
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22 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide during endotoxemia in awake sheep - effects of Nomega-nitro-l-arginine on the distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance and prostanoid products.
Koizumi T, Johnston D, Bjertnaes LJ, Banerjee MR, Newman JH
(2002) Exp Lung Res 28: 473-84
MeSH Terms: 6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, Animals, Endotoxemia, Enzyme Inhibitors, Hemodynamics, Nitric Oxide, Nitroarginine, Oxygen, Partial Pressure, Prostaglandins, Pulmonary Circulation, Sheep, Thromboxane B2, Vascular Resistance
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We examined the effects of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) inhibition on the longitudinal distribution of pulmonary vascular resistance and on arachidonic acid metabolism during endotoxemia in awake sheep. Mean pulmonary artery (Ppa), left atrial (Pla), and systemic artery pressure (Psa) were continuously measured, and cardiac output (CO) was continuously monitored by an implanted ultrasonic flow probe. We advanced a 7-French Swan-Ganz catheter into distal pulmonary artery and measured the pulmonary microwedge pressure (Pmw) with the balloon deflated, allowing calculation of upstream pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRup = [Ppa - Pmw]/CO) and down-stream PVR (PVRdown = [Pmw - Pla]/CO), respectively. In paired studies, endotoxin (1 micro g/kg) was infused over 30 minutes with and without N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (NLA) treatment. NLA (20 mg/kg) was administered 30 minutes before endotoxin infusion. Endotoxin caused increases in PVRup and PVRdown. Pretreatment with NLA increases PVRup at baseline and enhanced increases in both PVRup and PVRdown during endotoxemia. Plasma level of thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) and prostacyclin (6-keto = PGF(1alpha)) significantly increased 1 hour after endotoxin administration (TxB(2), 308.3 +/- 94.8 [SE] to 2163.5 +/- 988.5 pg ml(-1), P <.05; 6-keto=PGF(1alpha), 155.6 +/- 91.4 to 564.9 +/- 131.8 pg ml(-1), P <.05), but the increased levels were similar to those in the NLA-pretreated animals. We conclude that endogenous NO mainly regulates precapillary vascular tone at baseline, and that NO modulated pre- and postcapillary vascular constriction during endotoxemia in sheep. It appears that cyclooxygenase production in response to endotoxin is unaffected by NO and its vascular effects.
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14 MeSH Terms
Cyclooxygenase-2 promotes early atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-deficient mice.
Burleigh ME, Babaev VR, Oates JA, Harris RC, Gautam S, Riendeau D, Marnett LJ, Morrow JD, Fazio S, Linton MF
(2002) Circulation 105: 1816-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arteriosclerosis, Blood Platelets, Cyclooxygenase 2, Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Female, Indomethacin, Isoenzymes, Kinetics, Lactones, Lipids, Liver Transplantation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Prostaglandins, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, LDL, Sulfones, Thromboxane B2
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Atherosclerosis has features of an inflammatory disease. Because cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and promotes inflammation, we tested the hypotheses that selective COX-2 inhibition would reduce early lesion formation in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice and that macrophage COX-2 expression contributes to atherogenesis in LDLR-/- mice.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Treatment of male LDLR-/- mice fed the Western diet with rofecoxib or indomethacin for 6 weeks resulted in significant reductions in atherosclerosis in the proximal aorta (25% and 37%) and in the aorta en face (58% and 57%), respectively. Rofecoxib treatment did not inhibit platelet thromboxane production, a COX-1-mediated process, but it significantly reduced the urinary prostacyclin metabolite 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1alpha. Fetal liver cell transplantation was used to generate LDLR-/- mice null for expression of the COX-2 gene by macrophages. After 8 weeks on the Western diet, COX-2-/- --> LDLR-/- mice developed significantly less (33% to 39%) atherosclerosis than control COX-2+/+ --> LDLR-/- mice. In both the inhibitor studies and the transplant studies, serum lipids did not differ significantly between groups.
CONCLUSIONS - The present studies provide strong pharmacological and genetic evidence that COX-2 promotes early atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDLR-/- mice in vivo. These results support the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to the prevention of atherosclerosis.
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24 MeSH Terms
Prostacyclin and thromboxane changes predating clinical onset of preeclampsia: a multicenter prospective study.
Mills JL, DerSimonian R, Raymond E, Morrow JD, Roberts LJ, Clemens JD, Hauth JC, Catalano P, Sibai B, Curet LB, Levine RJ
(1999) JAMA 282: 356-62
MeSH Terms: 6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, Adult, Biomarkers, Epoprostenol, Female, Humans, Pre-Eclampsia, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Thromboxane A2, Thromboxane B2
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
CONTEXT - An imbalance in vasodilating (prostacyclin [PGI2]) and vasoconstricting (thromboxane A2 [TxA2]) eicosanoids may be important in preeclampsia, but prospective data from large studies needed to resolve this issue are lacking. Because most trials using aspirin to reduce TxA2 production have failed to prevent preeclampsia, it is critical to determine whether eicosanoid changes occur before the onset of clinical disease or are secondary to clinical manifestations of preeclampsia.
OBJECTIVE - To determine whether PGI2 or TxA2 changes occur before onset of clinical signs of preeclampsia.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - Multicenter prospective study from 1992 to 1995 of subjects from the placebo arm of the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention Trial. Women who developed preeclampsia (n = 134) were compared with matched normotensive control women (n = 139).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - Excretion of urinary metabolites of PGI2 (PGI-M) and TxA2 (Tx-M) as measured from timed urine collections obtained prospectively before 22 weeks', between 26 and 29 weeks', and at 36 weeks' gestation.
RESULTS - Women who developed preeclampsia had significantly lower PGI-M levels throughout pregnancy, even at 13 to 16 weeks' gestation (long before the onset of clinical disease); their gestational age-adjusted levels were 17% lower than those of controls (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-27%; P=.005). The Tx-M levels of preeclamptic women were not significantly higher overall (9% higher than those of controls; 95% CI, -3% to 23%; P=.14). The ratio of Tx-M to PGI-M, used to express relative vasoconstricting vs vasodilating effects, was 24% higher (95% CI, 6%-45%) in preeclamptic women throughout pregnancy (P=.007).
CONCLUSIONS - Our results show that reduced PGI2 production, but not increased TxA2 production, occurs many months before clinical onset of preeclampsia. Aspirin trials may have failed because an increase in thromboxane production is not the initial anomaly. Future interventions should make correcting prostacyclin deficiency a major part of the strategy to balance the abnormal vasoconstrictor-vasodilator ratio present in preeclampsia.
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12 MeSH Terms
Increased formation of thromboxane in vivo in humans with mastocytosis.
Morrow JD, Oates JA, Roberts LJ, Zackert WE, Mitchell TA, Lazarus G, Guzzo C
(1999) J Invest Dermatol 113: 93-7
MeSH Terms: 6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, Adult, Aged, Aspirin, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Female, Humans, Male, Methylhistamines, Middle Aged, Platelet Factor 4, Prostaglandins D, Thromboxane B2, Urticaria Pigmentosa, beta-Thromboglobulin
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Clinical manifestations of mastocytosis are mediated, at least in part, by release of the mast cell mediators histamine and prostaglandin D2. It has been previously reported that in addition to prostaglandin D2, mast cells produce other eicosanoids, including thromboxane. Nonetheless, little information exists regarding the formation of other prostanoids in vivo. The most accurate method to examine the systemic production of eicosanoids in vivo is the quantitation of urinary metabolites. We previously developed a highly accurate assay employing mass spectrometry to measure a major urinary metabolite of thromboxane, 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2, in humans. We utilized this assay to quantitate thromboxane production in 17 patients with histologically proven mastocytosis. We report that thromboxane formation was significantly increased (>2 SD above the mean) in at least one urine sample from 65% of patients studied. Of these, 91% of patients with documented systemic involvement had elevated thromboxane generation. In addition, endogenous formation of thromboxane was highly correlated with the urinary excretion of the major urinary metabolite of prostaglandin D2 (r = 0.98) and Ntau-methylhistamine (r = 0.91), suggesting that the cellular source of increased thromboxane in vivo could be the mastocyte. Enhanced thromboxane formation in patients with this disorder is unlikely to be of platelet origin as other markers of platelet activation, platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin, were not increased in three patients with marked overproduction of thromboxane. Furthermore, the recovery of 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 excretion in two patients after the administration of aspirin occurred significantly more rapidly than the recovery of platelet thromboxane generation. These studies, therefore, report that thromboxane production is significantly increased in the majority of patients with mastocytosis that we examined and provide the basis to elucidate the role of this eicosanoid in disorders of mast cell activation.
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15 MeSH Terms