Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 40

Publication Record

Connections

Thrombin induced by the extrinsic pathway and PAR-1 regulated inflammation at the site of fracture repair.
Sato N, Ichikawa J, Wako M, Ohba T, Saito M, Sato H, Koyama K, Hagino T, Schoenecker JG, Ando T, Haro H
(2016) Bone 83: 23-34
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Movement, Chemokine CCL2, Disease Models, Animal, Fracture Healing, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-6, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Biological, Osteoblasts, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, RAW 264.7 Cells, Receptor, PAR-1, Thrombin, Thromboplastin
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Thrombin (coagulation factor IIa) is a serine protease encoded by the F2 gene. Pro-thrombin (coagulation factor II) is cut to generate thrombin in the coagulation cascade that results in a reduction of blood loss. Procoagulant states that lead to activation of thrombin are common in bone fracture sites. However, its physiological roles and relationship with osteoblasts in bone fractures are largely unknown. We herein report various effects of thrombin on mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. MC3T3-E1 cells expressed proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), also known as the coagulation factor II receptor. They also produced monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), tissue factor (TF), MCSF and IL-6 upon thrombin stimulation through the PI3K-Akt and MEK-Erk1/2 pathways. Furthermore, MCP-1 obtained from thrombin-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells induced migration by macrophage RAW264 cells. All these effects of thrombin on MC3T3-E1 cells were abolished by the selective non-peptide thrombin receptor inhibitor SCH79797. We also found that thrombin, PAR-1, MCP-1, TF as well as phosphorylated AKT and p42/44 were significantly expressed at the fracture site of mouse femoral bone. Collectively, thrombin/PAR-1 interaction regulated MCP-1, TF, MCSF and IL-6 production by MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, MCP-1 induced RAW264 cell migration. Thrombin may thus be a novel cytokine that regulates several aspects of osteoblast function and fracture healing.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.
Shaver CM, Grove BS, Putz ND, Clune JK, Lawson WE, Carnahan RH, Mackman N, Ware LB, Bastarache JA
(2015) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 53: 719-27
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Animals, Blood Coagulation, Capillary Permeability, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Gene Expression, Hemorrhage, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Cells, Pulmonary Alveoli, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Respiratory Mucosa, Thromboplastin
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2016
Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Excess of heme induces tissue factor-dependent activation of coagulation in mice.
Sparkenbaugh EM, Chantrathammachart P, Wang S, Jonas W, Kirchhofer D, Gailani D, Gruber A, Kasthuri R, Key NS, Mackman N, Pawlinski R
(2015) Haematologica 100: 308-14
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Hemolytic, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Animals, Antibodies, Blood Coagulation, Capillary Permeability, Cells, Cultured, Factor XI, Factor XIIa, Female, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression, Heme, Hemopexin, Humans, Injections, Intravenous, Leukocytes, Mononuclear, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, RNA, Small Interfering, Swine, Thromboplastin
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
An excess of free heme is present in the blood during many types of hemolytic anemia. This has been linked to organ damage caused by heme-mediated oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. We investigated the mechanism of heme-induced coagulation activation in vivo. Heme caused coagulation activation in wild-type mice that was attenuated by an anti-tissue factor antibody and in mice expressing low levels of tissue factor. In contrast, neither factor XI deletion nor inhibition of factor XIIa-mediated factor XI activation reduced heme-induced coagulation activation, suggesting that the intrinsic coagulation pathway is not involved. We investigated the source of tissue factor in heme-induced coagulation activation. Heme increased the procoagulant activity of mouse macrophages and human PBMCs. Tissue factor-positive staining was observed on leukocytes isolated from the blood of heme-treated mice but not on endothelial cells in the lungs. Furthermore, heme increased vascular permeability in the mouse lungs, kidney and heart. Deletion of tissue factor from either myeloid cells, hematopoietic or endothelial cells, or inhibition of tissue factor expressed by non-hematopoietic cells did not reduce heme-induced coagulation activation. However, heme-induced activation of coagulation was abolished when both non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic cell tissue factor was inhibited. Finally, we demonstrated that coagulation activation was partially attenuated in sickle cell mice treated with recombinant hemopexin to neutralize free heme. Our results indicate that heme promotes tissue factor-dependent coagulation activation and induces tissue factor expression on leukocytes in vivo. We also demonstrated that free heme may contribute to thrombin generation in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.
Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
25 MeSH Terms
Factor XI antisense oligonucleotide for prevention of venous thrombosis.
Büller HR, Bethune C, Bhanot S, Gailani D, Monia BP, Raskob GE, Segers A, Verhamme P, Weitz JI, FXI-ASO TKA Investigators
(2015) N Engl J Med 372: 232-40
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anticoagulants, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee, Blood Coagulation, Clinical Protocols, Enoxaparin, Factor XI, Female, Hemorrhage, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Oligonucleotides, Oligonucleotides, Antisense, Partial Thromboplastin Time, Postoperative Complications, Venous Thrombosis
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Experimental data indicate that reducing factor XI levels attenuates thrombosis without causing bleeding, but the role of factor XI in the prevention of postoperative venous thrombosis in humans is unknown. FXI-ASO (ISIS 416858) is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide that specifically reduces factor XI levels. We compared the efficacy and safety of FXI-ASO with those of enoxaparin in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.
METHODS - In this open-label, parallel-group study, we randomly assigned 300 patients who were undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty to receive one of two doses of FXI-ASO (200 mg or 300 mg) or 40 mg of enoxaparin once daily. The primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of venous thromboembolism (assessed by mandatory bilateral venography or report of symptomatic events). The principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding.
RESULTS - Around the time of surgery, the mean (±SE) factor XI levels were 0.38±0.01 units per milliliter in the 200-mg FXI-ASO group, 0.20±0.01 units per milliliter in the 300-mg FXI-ASO group, and 0.93±0.02 units per milliliter in the enoxaparin group. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 36 of 134 patients (27%) who received the 200-mg dose of FXI-ASO and in 3 of 71 patients (4%) who received the 300-mg dose of FXI-ASO, as compared with 21 of 69 patients (30%) who received enoxaparin. The 200-mg regimen was noninferior, and the 300-mg regimen was superior, to enoxaparin (P<0.001). Bleeding occurred in 3%, 3%, and 8% of the patients in the three study groups, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - This study showed that factor XI contributes to postoperative venous thromboembolism; reducing factor XI levels in patients undergoing elective primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty was an effective method for its prevention and appeared to be safe with respect to the risk of bleeding. (Funded by Isis Pharmaceuticals; FXI-ASO TKA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01713361.).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Circulating microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies: characterization and associations.
Chaturvedi S, Cockrell E, Espinola R, Hsi L, Fulton S, Khan M, Li L, Fonseca F, Kundu S, McCrae KR
(2015) Thromb Res 135: 102-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antibodies, Anticardiolipin, Antibodies, Antiphospholipid, Antigens, CD, Antiphospholipid Syndrome, Blood Platelets, Cadherins, Cell-Derived Microparticles, Endoglin, Endothelial Cells, Female, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Lipopolysaccharide Receptors, Male, Middle Aged, Partial Thromboplastin Time, Receptors, Cell Surface, Thromboplastin, Thrombosis, beta 2-Glycoprotein I
Show Abstract · Added August 1, 2015
The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or recurrent fetal loss in the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. These antibodies cause activation of endothelial and other cell types leading to the release of microparticles with procoagulant and pro-inflammatory properties. The aims of this study were to characterize the levels of endothelial cell, monocyte or platelet derived, and tissue factor-bearing microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies, to determine the association of circulating microparticles with anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein antibodies, and to define the cellular origin of microparticles that express tissue factor. Microparticle content within citrated blood from 47 patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and 144 healthy controls was analyzed within 2hours of venipuncture. Levels of Annexin-V, CD105 and CD144 (endothelial derived), CD41 (platelet derived) and tissue factor positive microparticles were significantly higher in patients than controls. Though levels of CD14 (monocyte-derived) microparticles in patient plasma were not significantly increased, increased levels of CD14 and tissue factor positive microparticles were observed in patients. Levels of microparticles that stained for CD105 and CD144 showed a positive correlation with IgG (R=0.60, p=0.006) and IgM anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (R=0.58, p=0.006). The elevation of endothelial and platelet derived microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and their correlation with anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies suggests a chronic state of vascular cell activation in these individuals and an important role for β2-glycoprotein I in development of the pro-thrombotic state associated with antiphospholipid antibodies.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Factor XII inhibition reduces thrombus formation in a primate thrombosis model.
Matafonov A, Leung PY, Gailani AE, Grach SL, Puy C, Cheng Q, Sun MF, McCarty OJ, Tucker EI, Kataoka H, Renné T, Morrissey JH, Gruber A, Gailani D
(2014) Blood 123: 1739-46
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Blood Coagulation, Disease Models, Animal, Factor XI, Factor XII, Factor XII Deficiency, Factor XIIa, Fibrin, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Papio, Recombinant Proteins, Thrombin, Thromboplastin, Thrombosis
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
The plasma zymogens factor XII (fXII) and factor XI (fXI) contribute to thrombosis in a variety of mouse models. These proteins serve a limited role in hemostasis, suggesting that antithrombotic therapies targeting them may be associated with low bleeding risks. Although there is substantial epidemiologic evidence supporting a role for fXI in human thrombosis, the situation is not as clear for fXII. We generated monoclonal antibodies (9A2 and 15H8) against the human fXII heavy chain that interfere with fXII conversion to the protease factor XIIa (fXIIa). The anti-fXII antibodies were tested in models in which anti-fXI antibodies are known to have antithrombotic effects. Both anti-fXII antibodies reduced fibrin formation in human blood perfused through collagen-coated tubes. fXII-deficient mice are resistant to ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis, and this resistance can be reversed by infusion of human fXII. 9A2 partially blocks, and 15H8 completely blocks, the prothrombotic effect of fXII in this model. 15H8 prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time of baboon and human plasmas. 15H8 reduced fibrin formation in collagen-coated vascular grafts inserted into arteriovenous shunts in baboons, and reduced fibrin and platelet accumulation downstream of the graft. These findings support a role for fXII in thrombus formation in primates.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Mechanical stretch inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced keratinocyte-derived chemokine and tissue factor expression while increasing procoagulant activity in murine lung epithelial cells.
Sebag SC, Bastarache JA, Ware LB
(2013) J Biol Chem 288: 7875-7884
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Cell Survival, Chemokines, Coagulants, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Epithelial Cells, Inflammation, Keratinocytes, Lipopolysaccharides, Lung, Mice, NF-kappa B, Signal Transduction, Thromboplastin, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Toll-Like Receptors
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Previous studies have shown that the innate immune stimulant LPS augments mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary coagulation and inflammation. Whether these effects are mediated by alveolar epithelial cells is unclear. The alveolar epithelium is a key regulator of the innate immune reaction to pathogens and can modulate both intra-alveolar inflammation and coagulation through up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue factor (TF), the principal initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. We hypothesized that cyclic mechanical stretch (MS) potentiates LPS-mediated alveolar epithelial cell (MLE-12) expression of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) and TF. Contrary to our hypothesis, MS significantly decreased LPS-induced KC and TF mRNA and protein expression. Investigation into potential mechanisms showed that stretch significantly reduced LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4 that was not a result of increased degradation. Decreased cell surface TLR4 expression was concomitant with reduced LPS-mediated NF-κB activation. Immunofluorescence staining showed that cyclic MS markedly altered LPS-induced organization of actin filaments. In contrast to expression, MS significantly increased LPS-induced cell surface TF activity independent of calcium signaling. These findings suggest that cyclic MS of lung epithelial cells down-regulates LPS-mediated inflammatory and procoagulant expression by modulating actin organization and reducing cell surface TLR4 expression and signaling. However, because LPS-induced surface TF activity was enhanced by stretch, these data demonstrate differential pathways regulating TF expression and activity. Ultimately, loss of LPS responsiveness in the epithelium induced by MS could result in increased susceptibility of the lung to bacterial infections in the setting of mechanical ventilation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Low levels of tissue factor lead to alveolar haemorrhage, potentiating murine acute lung injury and oxidative stress.
Bastarache JA, Sebag SC, Clune JK, Grove BS, Lawson WE, Janz DR, Roberts LJ, Dworski R, Mackman N, Ware LB
(2012) Thorax 67: 1032-9
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Blotting, Western, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, Cytokines, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Furans, Hemoglobins, Hemorrhage, Inflammation, Isoprostanes, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Oxidative Stress, Pulmonary Alveoli, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Statistics, Nonparametric, Thromboplastin
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - Systemic blockade of tissue factor (TF) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) in animal models of sepsis but the effects of global TF deficiency are unknown. We used mice with complete knockout of mouse TF and low levels (∼1%) of human TF (LTF mice) to test the hypothesis that global TF deficiency attenuates lung inflammation in direct lung injury.
METHODS - LTF mice were treated with 10 μg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle administered by direct intratracheal injection and studied at 24 h.
RESULTS - Contrary to our hypothesis, LTF mice had increased lung inflammation and injury as measured by bronchoalveolar lavage cell count (3.4×10(5) wild-type (WT) LPS vs 3.3×10(5) LTF LPS, p=0.947) and protein (493 μg/ml WT LPS vs 1014 μg/ml LTF LPS, p=0.006), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12, p<0.035 WT LPS vs LTF LPS) and histology compared with WT mice. LTF mice also had increased haemorrhage and free haemoglobin in the airspace accompanied by increased oxidant stress as measured by lipid peroxidation products (F(2) isoprostanes and isofurans).
CONCLUSIONS - These findings indicate that global TF deficiency does not confer protection in a direct lung injury model. Rather, TF deficiency causes increased intra-alveolar haemorrhage following LPS leading to increased lipid peroxidation. Strategies to globally inhibit TF may be deleterious in patients with ALI.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Persistent hypocoagulability in patients with septic shock predicts greater hospital mortality: impact of impaired thrombin generation.
Massion PB, Peters P, Ledoux D, Zimermann V, Canivet JL, Massion PP, Damas P, Gothot A
(2012) Intensive Care Med 38: 1326-35
MeSH Terms: Aged, Anticoagulants, Antithrombin III, Blood Coagulation Disorders, Blood Coagulation Factors, Female, Fibrin, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Partial Thromboplastin Time, Prospective Studies, Protein C, Prothrombin Time, Shock, Septic, Thrombin
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
PURPOSE - Sepsis induces hypercoagulability, hypofibrinolysis, microthrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction leading to multiple organ failure. However, not all studies reported benefit from anticoagulation for patients with severe sepsis, and time courses of coagulation abnormalities in septic shock are poorly documented. Therefore, the aim of this prospective observational cohort study was to describe the coagulation profile of patients with septic shock and to determine whether alterations of the profile are associated with hospital mortality.
METHODS - Thirty-nine patients with septic shock on ICU admission were prospectively included in the study. From admission to day 7, analytical coagulation tests, thrombin generation (TG) assays, and thromboelastometric analyses were performed and tested for association with survival.
RESULTS - Patients with septic shock presented on admission prolongation of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), increased consumption of most procoagulant factors as well as both delay and deficit in TG, all compatible with a hypocoagulable state compared with reference values (P < 0.001). Time courses revealed a persistent hypocoagulability profile in non-survivors as compared with survivors. From multiple logistic regression, prolonged aPTT (P = 0.007) and persistence of TG deficit (P = 0.024) on day 3 were strong predictors of mortality, independently from disease severity scores, disseminated intravascular coagulation score, and standard coagulation tests on admission.
CONCLUSIONS - Patients with septic shock present with hypocoagulability at the time of ICU admission. Persistence of hypocoagulability assessed by prolonged aPTT and unresolving deficit in TG on day 3 after onset of septic shock is associated with greater hospital mortality.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Markers of inflammation and coagulation may be modulated by enteral feeding strategy.
Bastarache JA, Ware LB, Girard TD, Wheeler AP, Rice TW
(2012) JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 36: 732-40
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Blood Coagulation, Critical Illness, Energy Intake, Enteral Nutrition, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Inflammation Mediators, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, Respiration, Respiration, Artificial, Respiratory Insufficiency, Thromboplastin
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
BACKGROUND - Although enteral nutrition (EN) is provided to most mechanically ventilated patients, the effect of specific feeding strategies on circulating markers of coagulation and inflammation is unknown.
METHODS - Markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-1β, interferon [IFN]-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12) and coagulation (tissue factor [TF], plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) were measured at baseline (n = 185) and 6 days (n = 103) in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients enrolled in a randomized controlled study of trophic vs full-energy feeds to test the hypothesis that trophic enteral feeds would be associated with decreases in markers of inflammation and coagulation compared to full-energy feeds.
RESULTS - There were no differences in any of the biomarkers measured at day 6 between patients who were randomized to receive trophic feeds compared to full-energy feeds. However, TF levels decreased modestly in patients from baseline to day 6 in the trophic feeding group (343.3 vs 247.8 pg/mL, P = .061) but increased slightly in the full-calorie group (314.3 vs 331.8 pg/mL). Lower levels of TF at day 6 were associated with a lower mortality, and patients who died had increasing TF levels between days 0 and 6 (median increase of 39.7) compared to decreasing TF levels in patients who lived (median decrease of 95.0, P = .033).
CONCLUSIONS - EN strategy in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure does not significantly modify inflammation and coagulation by day 6, but trophic feeds may have some modest effects in attenuating inflammation and coagulation.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms