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Postoperative Opiate Use in Urological Patients: A Quality Improvement Study Aimed at Improving Opiate Disposal Practices.
Cabo J, Hsi RS, Scarpato KR
(2019) J Urol 201: 371-376
MeSH Terms: Analgesics, Opioid, Humans, Pain Management, Pain, Postoperative, Patient Education as Topic, Postoperative Period, Prescription Drug Misuse, Quality Improvement, Retrospective Studies, Tennessee, Urologic Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
PURPOSE - We aimed to determine trends in postoperative opiate management among urological patients, identify associations with opiate keeping and foster appropriate opiate disposal after surgery via introduction of an educational handout.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We retrospectively analyzed opiate practices in 68 patients who had undergone urological surgery. In a separate consecutive cohort of 59 patients we distributed a handout detailing FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved disposal methods. Patient opiate obtainment, use and disposal were assessed via telephone interviews with prescription filling data verified using the Tennessee CSMD (Controlled Substances Monitoring Database). Opiate keeping was defined as possessing any opiates more than 3 weeks after surgery or more than 4 times the duration of the postoperative prescription, whichever was longer.
RESULTS - Opiate keeping was observed in 41 patients (72%) in our initial cohort. Of these patients 68% left the medication unsecured at home. Major barriers to opiate disposal included concern for return of disease specific pain in 44% of patients and unrelated pain in 29%. As assessed on a short test, opiate keepers were less knowledgeable about safe disposal practices compared to nonkeepers (72% vs 85%, p = 0.005). Among opiate keepers there was an improvement in knowledge scores after the intervention (66% to 77%, p = 0.03). When comparing pre-education to post-education, there was no detectable improvement in the rate of opiate keeping (72% vs 68%, p = 0.66) or proper disposal (9% vs 8%, p = 1.0).
CONCLUSIONS - Opiate keeping is common following urological surgery and a major barrier to disposal is concern for the return of disease specific pain. Future interventions aimed at limiting opiate keeping should combine evidence-based prescription practices and targeted patient education.
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11 MeSH Terms
Validation of discharge diagnosis codes to identify serious infections among middle age and older adults.
Wiese AD, Griffin MR, Stein CM, Schaffner W, Greevy RA, Mitchel EF, Grijalva CG
(2018) BMJ Open 8: e020857
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Algorithms, Clinical Coding, Female, Humans, Infection, International Classification of Diseases, Male, Medicaid, Medical Records, Middle Aged, Patient Discharge, Predictive Value of Tests, Reproducibility of Results, Retrospective Studies, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
OBJECTIVES - Hospitalisations for serious infections are common among middle age and older adults and frequently used as study outcomes. Yet, few studies have evaluated the performance of diagnosis codes to identify serious infections in this population. We sought to determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of diagnosis codes for identifying hospitalisations due to serious infections among middle age and older adults.
SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS - We identified hospitalisations for possible infection among adults >=50 years enrolled in the Tennessee Medicaid healthcare programme (2008-2012) using International Classifications of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes for pneumonia, meningitis/encephalitis, bacteraemia/sepsis, cellulitis/soft-tissue infections, endocarditis, pyelonephritis and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis.
DESIGN - Medical records were systematically obtained from hospitals randomly selected from a stratified sampling framework based on geographical region and hospital discharge volume.
MEASURES - Two trained clinical reviewers used a standardised extraction form to abstract information from medical records. Predefined algorithms served as reference to adjudicate confirmed infection-specific hospitalisations. We calculated the PPV of diagnosis codes using confirmed hospitalisations as reference. Sensitivity analyses determined the robustness of the PPV to definitions that required radiological or microbiological confirmation. We also determined inter-rater reliability between reviewers.
RESULTS - The PPV of diagnosis codes for hospitalisations for infection (n=716) was 90.2% (95% CI 87.8% to 92.2%). The PPV was highest for pneumonia (96.5% (95% CI 93.9% to 98.0%)) and cellulitis (91.1% (95% CI 84.7% to 94.9%)), and lowest for meningitis/encephalitis (50.0% (95% CI 23.7% to 76.3%)). The adjudication reliability was excellent (92.7% agreement; first agreement coefficient: 0.91). The overall PPV was lower when requiring microbiological confirmation (45%) and when requiring radiological confirmation for pneumonia (79%).
CONCLUSIONS - Discharge diagnosis codes have a high PPV for identifying hospitalisations for common, serious infections among middle age and older adults. PPV estimates for rare infections were imprecise.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
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18 MeSH Terms
Angiotensin receptor blocker vs ACE inhibitor effects on HDL functionality in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.
Kaseda R, Tsuchida Y, Gamboa JL, Zhong J, Zhang L, Yang H, Dikalova A, Bian A, Davies S, Fogo AF, Linton MF, Brown NJ, Ikizler TA, Kon V
(2018) Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 28: 582-591
MeSH Terms: Adult, Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Biomarkers, Cholesterol, HDL, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Inflammation Mediators, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Ramipril, Renal Dialysis, Tennessee, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Valsartan
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2018
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) reduce cardiovascular events in the general population. Maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients are at high cardiovascular risk but few studies have directly addressed the comparative efficacy of these drugs. MHD disrupts the normally atheroprotective actions of high density lipoprotein (HDL), therefore, we compared ACEI or ARB treatment on HDL functions in MHD.
METHODS AND RESULTS - HDL was isolated at the starting point (pre) and 3-6 months later (post) in 30 MHD randomly assigned to placebo, ramipril or valsartan. Outcomes included cholesterol efflux, inflammatory cytokine response, effects on Toll-like receptors (TLR), superoxide production, methylarginine and serum amyloid A (SAA) levels. HDL from ARB- or ACEI-treated subjects was more effective in maintaining efflux than HDL of placebo. HDL from ARB- or ACEI-treated subjects but not placebo lessened cellular superoxide production. In contrast, neither ARB nor ACEI improved HDL anti-inflammatory effect. Indeed, HDL of ACEI-treated subjects potentiated the cytokine responses in association with activation of TLR but did not alter the HDL content of methylarginines or SAA.
CONCLUSION - Both ACEI and ARB stabilized HDL cholesterol acceptor function and sustained cellular anti-oxidative effects but not anti-inflammatory effects, and ACEI-treatment instead amplified the HDL inflammatory response. The findings reveal possible utility of antagonizing angiotensin actions in MDH and suggest a possible mechanism for superiority of ARB vs ACEI in the setting of advanced kidney disease.
Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Improving the value of care for appendectomy through an individual surgeon-specific approach.
Robinson JR, Carter NH, Gibson C, Brinkman AS, Van Arendonk K, Speck KE, Danko ME, Jackson GP, Lovvorn HN, Blakely ML
(2018) J Pediatr Surg 53: 1181-1186
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Appendectomy, Appendicitis, Child, Child, Preschool, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Female, Hospital Costs, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Laparoscopy, Male, Operating Rooms, Prospective Studies, Quality of Health Care, Surgeons, Tennessee, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2018
PURPOSE - Standardized care via a unified surgeon preference card for pediatric appendectomy can result in significant cost reduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of cost and outcome feedback to surgeons on value of care in an environment reluctant to adopt a standardized surgeon preference card.
METHODS - Prospective observational study comparing operating room (OR) supply costs and patient outcomes for appendectomy in children with 6-month observation periods both before and after intervention. The intervention was real-time feedback of OR supply cost data to individual surgeons via automated dashboards and monthly reports.
RESULTS - Two hundred sixteen children underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for non-perforated appendicitis (110 pre-intervention and 106 post-intervention). Median supply cost significantly decreased after intervention: $884 (IQR $705-$1025) to $388 (IQR $182-$776), p<0.001. No significant change was detected in median OR duration (47min [IQR 36-63] to 50min [IQR 38-64], p=0.520) or adverse events (1 [0.9%] to 6 [4.7%], p=0.062). OR supply costs for individual surgeons significantly decreased during the intervention period for 6 of 8 surgeons (87.5%).
CONCLUSION - Approaching value measurement with a surgeon-specific (rather than group-wide) approach can reduce OR supply costs while maintaining excellent clinical outcomes.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Level II.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Opioid Analgesic Use and Risk for Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases: A Nested Case-Control Study.
Wiese AD, Griffin MR, Schaffner W, Stein CM, Greevy RA, Mitchel EF, Grijalva CG
(2018) Ann Intern Med 168: 396-404
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Analgesics, Opioid, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumococcal Infections, Population Surveillance, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Although certain opioid analgesics have immunosuppressive properties and increase the risk for infections in animals, the clinical effects of prescription opioid use on infection risk among humans are unknown.
Objective - To test the hypothesis that prescription opioid use is an independent risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD).
Design - Nested case-control study.
Setting - Tennessee Medicaid database linked to Medicare and Active Bacterial Core surveillance system databases (1995 to 2014).
Patients - 1233 case patients with IPD aged 5 years and older matched to 24 399 control participants by diagnosis date, age, and county of residence.
Measurements - Opioid use was measured on the basis of pharmacy prescription fills. Invasive pneumococcal disease was defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from a normally sterile site. The odds of current opioid use were compared between the case and control groups, accounting for known IPD risk factors. Secondary analyses categorized opioid use by opioid characteristics, applied an IPD risk score to assure comparability between exposure groups, and analyzed pneumonia and nonpneumonia IPD cases separately.
Results - Persons in the case group had greater odds than control participants of being current opioid users (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.62 [95% CI, 1.36 to 1.92]). Associations were strongest for opioids that were long acting (aOR, 1.87 [CI, 1.24 to 2.82]), of high potency (aOR, 1.72 [CI, 1.32 to 2.25]), or were used at high dosages (50 to 90 morphine milligram equivalents [MME]/d: aOR, 1.71 [CI, 1.22 to 2.39]; ≥90 MME/d: aOR, 1.75 [CI, 1.33 to 2.29]). Results were consistent when the IPD risk score was taken into account and pneumonia and nonpneumonia IPD were analyzed separately.
Limitations - Unmeasured confounding and measurement error, although sensitivity analyses suggested that neither was likely to affect results. Actual opioid use and other nonprescription use (such as illicit opioid use) were not measured.
Conclusion - Opioid use is associated with an increased risk for IPD and represents a novel risk factor for these diseases.
Primary Funding Source - National Institutes of Health.
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16 MeSH Terms
Measures of Adherence and Challenges in Using Glucometer Data in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Rethinking the Value of Self-Report.
Datye KA, Patel NJ, Jaser SS
(2017) J Diabetes Res 2017: 1075428
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Blood Glucose, Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring, Caregivers, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Insulin Infusion Systems, Male, Patient Compliance, Self Report, Self-Management, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2018
Purpose - The current study compares the relative strength of associations of different adherence measures with glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, while highlighting the challenges in using more objective measures (i.e., glucometer data).
Methods - Adolescents with type 1 diabetes ( = 149) and their caregivers completed a questionnaire measure assessing adolescents' adherence (Self-Care Inventory (SCI)) to the diabetes regimen. Adolescents' glucometers were downloaded to determine average blood glucose checks per day, as an objective measure of adherence. A measure of glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)) was obtained as part of adolescents' regular clinic visits.
Results - Adolescents' self-reported adherence to the treatment regimen was more strongly correlated with HbA1c than caregivers' reports of adherence. In multivariate analyses, both adolescents' self-report of adherence and average blood glucose checks per day (obtained via a glucometer) were significant predictors of HbA1c. Challenges to obtaining glucometer data were identified.
Conclusions - The findings highlight adolescents' self-report of adherence using the SCI as a brief and meaningful measure to understand and improve adolescents' glycemic control, particularly when glucometer data is difficult to obtain.
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20 MeSH Terms
Interpregnancy Interval After Pregnancy Loss and Risk of Repeat Miscarriage.
Sundermann AC, Hartmann KE, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) Obstet Gynecol 130: 1312-1318
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Birth Intervals, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Maternal Age, Parity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Pregnancy Outcome, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To assess whether interpregnancy interval length after a pregnancy loss is associated with risk of repeat miscarriage.
METHODS - This analysis includes pregnant women participating in the Right From the Start (2000-2012) community-based prospective cohort study whose most recent pregnancy before enrollment ended in miscarriage. Interpregnancy interval was defined as the time between a prior miscarriage and the last menstrual period of the study pregnancy. Miscarriage was defined as pregnancy loss before 20 weeks of gestation. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate crude and adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs for the association between different interpregnancy interval lengths and miscarriage in the study pregnancy. Adjusted models included maternal age, race, parity, body mass index, and education.
RESULTS - Among the 514 study participants who reported miscarriage as their most recent pregnancy outcome, 15.7% had a repeat miscarriage in the study pregnancy (n=81). Median maternal age was 30 years (interquartile range 27-34) and 55.6% of participants had at least one previous livebirth (n=286). When compared with women with interpregnancy intervals of 6-18 months (n=136), women with intervals of less than 3 months (n=124) had the lowest risk of repeat miscarriage (7.3% compared with 22.1%; adjusted hazard ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.16-0.71). Neither maternal race nor parity modified the association. Attempting to conceive immediately was not associated with increased risk of miscarriage in the next pregnancy.
CONCLUSION - An interpregnancy interval after pregnancy loss of less than 3 months is associated with the lowest risk of subsequent miscarriage. This implies counseling women to delay conception to reduce risk of miscarriage may not be warranted.
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Fludrocortisone Is Associated With a Higher Risk of All-Cause Hospitalizations Compared With Midodrine in Patients With Orthostatic Hypotension.
Grijalva CG, Biaggioni I, Griffin MR, Shibao CA
(2017) J Am Heart Assoc 6:
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Agonists, Aged, Blood Pressure, Databases, Factual, Female, Fludrocortisone, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, Hypotension, Orthostatic, Incidence, Logistic Models, Male, Medicaid, Middle Aged, Midodrine, Multivariate Analysis, Prevalence, Propensity Score, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tennessee, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vasoconstrictor Agents
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Orthostatic hypotension causes ≈80 000 hospitalizations per year in the United States. Treatments for orthostatic hypotension include fludrocortisone, a mineralocorticoid analog that promotes sodium reabsorption; and midodrine, an α-1 adrenergic agonist that is a direct vasoconstrictor. Although both medications are used to treat orthostatic hypotension, few studies have compared their relative safety.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We compared incidence rates of hospitalizations for all causes, and for congestive heart failure between users of fludrocortisone and users of midodrine in a retrospective cohort study of Tennessee Medicaid adult enrollees (1995-2009). Adjusted incidence rate ratios were calculated using negative binomial regression models. Subgroup analyses based on history of congestive heart failure were conducted. We studied 1324 patients initiating fludrocortisone and 797 patients initiating midodrine. Compared with fludrocortisone users, midodrine users had higher prevalence of cardiovascular conditions. Incidence rates of all-cause hospitalizations for fludrocortisone and midodrine users were 1489 and 1330 per 1000 person-years, respectively (adjusted incidence-rate ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.40). The respective rates of heart failure-related hospitalization were 76 and 84 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.33, 95% confidence interval, 0.79-2.56). Among patients with a history of congestive heart failure, the rates of all-cause hospitalization for fludrocortisone and midodrine were 2448 and 1820 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.42, 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.90), and the respective rates of heart failure exacerbation-related hospitalizations were 297 and 263 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.48, 95% confidence interval, 0.69-3.16).
CONCLUSIONS - Compared with users of midodrine, users of fludrocortisone had higher rates of all-cause hospitalizations, especially among patients with congestive heart failure.
© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.
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A technology-based patient and family engagement consult service for the pediatric hospital setting.
Jackson GP, Robinson JR, Ingram E, Masterman M, Ivory C, Holloway D, Anders S, Cronin RM
(2018) J Am Med Inform Assoc 25: 167-174
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Consumer Health Informatics, Consumer Health Information, Family, Female, Hospitals, Pediatric, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Information Seeking Behavior, Information Technology, Internet, Male, Mobile Applications, Patient-Centered Care, Referral and Consultation, Retrospective Studies, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added November 8, 2017
Objective - The Vanderbilt Children's Hospital launched an innovative Technology-Based Patient and Family Engagement Consult Service in 2014. This paper describes our initial experience with this service, characterizes health-related needs of families of hospitalized children, and details the technologies recommended to promote engagement and meet needs.
Materials and Methods - We retrospectively reviewed consult service documentation for patient characteristics, health-related needs, and consultation team recommendations. Needs were categorized using a consumer health needs taxonomy. Recommendations were classified by technology type.
Results - Twenty-two consultations were conducted with families of patients ranging in age from newborn to 15 years, most with new diagnoses or chronic illnesses. The consultation team identified 99 health-related needs (4.5 per consultation) and made 166 recommendations (7.5 per consultation, 1.7 per need). Need categories included 38 informational needs, 26 medical needs, 23 logistical needs, and 12 social needs. The most common recommendations were websites (50, 30%) and mobile applications (30, 18%). The most frequent recommendations by need category were websites for informational needs (39, 50%), mobile applications for medical needs (15, 40%), patient portals for logistical needs (12, 44%), and disease-specific support groups for social needs (19, 56%).
Discussion - Families of hospitalized pediatric patients have a variety of health-related needs, many of which could be addressed by technology recommendations from an engagement consult service.
Conclusion - This service is the first of its kind, offering a potentially generalizable and scalable approach to assessing health-related needs, meeting them with technologies, and promoting patient and family engagement in the inpatient setting.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
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Diagnostic value of histone 3 mutations in osteoclast-rich bone tumors.
Nohr E, Lee LH, Cates JM, Perizzolo M, Itani D
(2017) Hum Pathol 68: 119-127
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Alberta, Biomarkers, Tumor, Bone Cysts, Aneurysmal, Bone Neoplasms, Child, Chondroblastoma, DNA Mutational Analysis, Diagnosis, Differential, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, Histones, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Osteoclasts, Phenotype, Predictive Value of Tests, Tennessee, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Differentiating osteoclast-rich lesions of bone (giant cell tumor of bone [GCTB], chondroblastoma [CBA], and aneurysmal bone cyst [ABC]) can be challenging, especially in small biopsies or fine-needle aspirations. Mutations affecting codons 34 and 36 of either H3 Histone Family Member 3A (H3F3A) and/or 3B (H3F3B) are characteristically seen in GCTB and CBAs. We devised a simple assay to identify these mutations and evaluated its applicability for routine clinical diagnosis. One hundred twenty-four tissue specimens from 108 patients (43 GCTBs, 38 CBAs and 27 ABCs) were collected from the archives of the Calgary Laboratory Services/University of Calgary and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Histology was reviewed by an expert orthopedic pathologist. A single base extension assay (SNaPshot) is used to interrogate each nucleotide in codons 34 and 36 of H3F3A and codon 36 of H3F3B. Final diagnoses were generated after re-reviewing cases and incorporating molecular findings. Of 43 GCTBs, 38 (88%) had an H3F3A G34W mutation; 35 of 38 CBAs (92%) had a K36M mutation in either H3F3B (N = 31; 82%) or H3F3A (N = 4; 11%); none of 27 ABCs had a tested mutation. Molecular findings changed the histomorphologic diagnosis in 5 cases (3 GCTB changed to ABC, and 2 ABC changed to GCTB). These findings support the diagnostic utility of mutational analysis for this differential diagnosis in certain challenging cases when clinicoradiologic and histomorphologic features are not definitive, particularly for distinguishing cellular ABC versus GCTB with secondary ABC.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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