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The TLR4 Agonist Monophosphoryl Lipid A Drives Broad Resistance to Infection via Dynamic Reprogramming of Macrophage Metabolism.
Fensterheim BA, Young JD, Luan L, Kleinbard RR, Stothers CL, Patil NK, McAtee-Pereira AG, Guo Y, Trenary I, Hernandez A, Fults JB, Williams DL, Sherwood ER, Bohannon JK
(2018) J Immunol 200: 3777-3789
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Candida albicans, Candidiasis, Glycolysis, Lipid A, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Signal Transduction, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a clinically used TLR4 agonist that has been found to drive nonspecific resistance to infection for up to 2 wk. However, the molecular mechanisms conferring protection are not well understood. In this study, we found that MPLA prompts resistance to infection, in part, by inducing a sustained and dynamic metabolic program in macrophages that supports improved pathogen clearance. Mice treated with MPLA had enhanced resistance to infection with and that was associated with augmented microbial clearance and organ protection. Tissue macrophages, which exhibited augmented phagocytosis and respiratory burst after MPLA treatment, were required for the beneficial effects of MPLA. Further analysis of the macrophage phenotype revealed that early TLR4-driven aerobic glycolysis was later coupled with mitochondrial biogenesis, enhanced malate shuttling, and increased mitochondrial ATP production. This metabolic program was initiated by overlapping and redundant contributions of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways as well as downstream mTOR activation. Blockade of mTOR signaling inhibited the development of the metabolic and functional macrophage phenotype and ablated MPLA-induced resistance to infection in vivo. Our findings reveal that MPLA drives macrophage metabolic reprogramming that evolves over a period of days to support a macrophage phenotype highly effective at mediating microbe clearance and that this results in nonspecific resistance to infection.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Heterozygous loss of TSC2 alters p53 signaling and human stem cell reprogramming.
Armstrong LC, Westlake G, Snow JP, Cawthon B, Armour E, Bowman AB, Ess KC
(2017) Hum Mol Genet 26: 4629-4641
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Alleles, Cellular Reprogramming, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Fibroblasts, Genes, p53, Heterozygote, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Infant, Loss of Heterozygosity, Male, Mutation, RNA, Small Interfering, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Tuberous Sclerosis, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 Protein, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 Protein, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a pediatric disorder of dysregulated growth and differentiation caused by loss of function mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which regulate mTOR kinase activity. To study aberrations of early development in TSC, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells using dermal fibroblasts obtained from patients with TSC. During validation, we found that stem cells generated from TSC patients had a very high rate of integration of the reprogramming plasmid containing a shRNA against TP53. We also found that loss of one allele of TSC2 in human fibroblasts is sufficient to increase p53 levels and impair stem cell reprogramming. Increased p53 was also observed in TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant human stem cells, suggesting that the interactions between TSC2 and p53 are consistent across cell types and gene dosage. These results support important contributions of TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells to the pathogenesis of TSC and the important role of p53 during reprogramming.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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24 MeSH Terms
The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor in the ventromedial hypothalamus reduces short-term food intake in male mice by regulating nutrient sensor activity.
Burmeister MA, Brown JD, Ayala JE, Stoffers DA, Sandoval DA, Seeley RJ, Ayala JE
(2017) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 313: E651-E662
MeSH Terms: Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase, Adenylate Kinase, Animals, Body Composition, CHO Cells, Cricetulus, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Eating, Exenatide, Food, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor, Glycolysis, Homeostasis, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Peptides, Sensation, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Venoms, Ventromedial Hypothalamic Nucleus
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2017
Pharmacological activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) reduces food intake. Here, we assessed whether suppression of food intake by GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RA) in this region is dependent on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We found that pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis, and thus activation of AMPK, in the VMH attenuates the anorectic effect of the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex4), indicating that glucose metabolism and inhibition of AMPK are both required for this effect. Furthermore, we found that Ex4-mediated anorexia in the VMH involved mTOR but not acetyl-CoA carboxylase, two downstream targets of AMPK. We support this by showing that Ex4 activates mTOR signaling in the VMH and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells. In contrast to the clear acute pharmacological impact of the these receptors on food intake, knockdown of the VMH conferred no changes in energy balance in either chow- or high-fat-diet-fed mice, and the acute anorectic and glucose tolerance effects of peripherally dosed GLP-1RA were preserved. These results show that the VMH GLP-1R regulates food intake by engaging key nutrient sensors but is dispensable for the effects of GLP-1RA on nutrient homeostasis.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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21 MeSH Terms
Distinct roles for the mTOR pathway in postnatal morphogenesis, maturation and function of pancreatic islets.
Sinagoga KL, Stone WJ, Schiesser JV, Schweitzer JI, Sampson L, Zheng Y, Wells JM
(2017) Development 144: 2402-2414
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cell Aggregation, Islets of Langerhans, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Mice, Models, Biological, Morphogenesis, Multiprotein Complexes, Mutation, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2018
While much is known about the molecular pathways that regulate embryonic development and adult homeostasis of the endocrine pancreas, little is known about what regulates early postnatal development and maturation of islets. Given that birth marks the first exposure to enteral nutrition, we investigated how nutrient-regulated signaling pathways influence postnatal islet development in mice. We performed loss-of-function studies of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a highly conserved kinase within a nutrient-sensing pathway known to regulate cellular growth, morphogenesis and metabolism. Deletion of Mtor in pancreatic endocrine cells had no significant effect on their embryonic development. However, within the first 2 weeks after birth, mTOR-deficient islets became dysmorphic, β-cell maturation and function were impaired, and animals lost islet mass. Moreover, we discovered that these distinct functions of mTOR are mediated by separate downstream branches of the pathway, in that mTORC1 (with adaptor protein Raptor) is the main complex mediating the maturation and function of islets, whereas mTORC2 (with adaptor protein Rictor) impacts islet mass and architecture. Taken together, these findings suggest that nutrient sensing may be an essential trigger for postnatal β-cell maturation and islet development.
© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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13 MeSH Terms
In silico evaluation of DNA Damage Inducible Transcript 4 gene (DDIT4) as prognostic biomarker in several malignancies.
Pinto JA, Rolfo C, Raez LE, Prado A, Araujo JM, Bravo L, Fajardo W, Morante ZD, Aguilar A, Neciosup SP, Mas LA, Bretel D, Balko JM, Gomez HL
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 1526
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Computer Simulation, DNA Damage, Databases as Topic, Humans, Neoplasms, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Prognosis, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus, Survival Analysis, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Transcription Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
DDIT4 gene encodes a protein whose main action is to inhibit mTOR under stress conditions whilst several in vitro studies indicate that its expression favors cancer progression. We have previously described that DDIT4 expression is an independent prognostic factor for tripe negative breast cancer resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We herein report that high DDIT4 expression is related to the outcome (recurrence-free survival, time to progression and overall survival) in several cancer types. We performed in silico analysis in online platforms, in pooled datasets from KM Plotter and meta-analysis of individual datasets from SurvExpress. High levels of DDIT4 were significantly associated with a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia, breast cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, colon, skin and lung cancer. Conversely, a high DDIT4 expression was associated with an improved prognostic in gastric cancer. DDIT4 was not associated with the outcome of ovarian cancers. Analysis with data from the Cell Miner Tool in 60 cancer cell lines indicated that although rapamycin activity was correlated with levels of MTOR, it is not influenced by DDIT4 expression. In summary, DDIT4 might serve as a novel prognostic biomarker in several malignancies. DDIT4 activity could be responsible for resistance to mTOR inhibitors and is a potential candidate for the development of targeted therapy.
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14 MeSH Terms
Strategies to overcome therapeutic resistance in renal cell carcinoma.
Siska PJ, Beckermann KE, Rathmell WK, Haake SM
(2017) Urol Oncol 35: 102-110
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Costimulatory and Inhibitory T-Cell Receptors, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Disease Progression, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Humans, Immunotherapy, Kidney, Kidney Neoplasms, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Nephrectomy, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a prevalent and lethal disease. At time of diagnosis, most patients present with localized disease. For these patients, the standard of care includes nephrectomy with close monitoring thereafter. While many patients will be cured, 5-year recurrence rates range from 30% to 60%. Furthermore, nearly one-third of patients present with metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. Metastatic disease is rarely curable and typically lethal. Cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation alone are incapable of controlling the disease. Extensive effort was expended in the development of cytokine therapies but response rates remain low. Newer agents targeting angiogenesis and mTOR signaling emerged in the 2000s and revolutionized patient care. While these agents improve progression free survival, the development of resistance is nearly universal. A new era of immunotherapy is now emerging, led by the checkpoint inhibitors. However, therapeutic resistance remains a complex issue that is likely to persist.
METHODS AND PURPOSE - In this review, we systematically evaluate preclinical research and clinical trials that address resistance to the primary RCC therapies, including anti-angiogenesis agents, mTOR inhibitors, and immunotherapies. As clear cell RCC is the most common adult kidney cancer and has been the focus of most studies, it will be the focus of this review.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
mTORC1 and mTORC2 in cancer and the tumor microenvironment.
Kim LC, Cook RS, Chen J
(2017) Oncogene 36: 2191-2201
MeSH Terms: Animals, Humans, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Multiprotein Complexes, Neoplasms, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial signaling node that integrates environmental cues to regulate cell survival, proliferation and metabolism, and is often deregulated in human cancer. mTOR kinase acts in two functionally distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and 2 (mTORC2), whose activities and substrate specificities are regulated by complex co-factors. Deregulation of this centralized signaling pathway has been associated with a variety of human diseases including diabetes, neurodegeneration and cancer. Although mTORC1 signaling has been extensively studied in cancer, recent discoveries indicate a subset of human cancers harboring amplifications in mTORC2-specific genes as the only actionable genomic alterations, suggesting a distinct role for mTORC2 in cancer as well. This review will summarize recent advances in dissecting the relative contributions of mTORC1 versus mTORC2 in cancer, their role in tumor-associated blood vessels and tumor immunity, and provide an update on mTOR inhibitors.
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8 MeSH Terms
Macrophage Apoptosis and Efferocytosis in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis.
Linton MF, Babaev VR, Huang J, Linton EF, Tao H, Yancey PG
(2016) Circ J 80: 2259-2268
MeSH Terms: Animals, Atherosclerosis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Humans, I-kappa B Kinase, Isoenzymes, Macrophages, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8, Multiprotein Complexes, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Unfolded Protein Response
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Macrophage apoptosis and the ability of macrophages to clean up dead cells, a process called efferocytosis, are crucial determinants of atherosclerosis lesion progression and plaque stability. Environmental stressors initiate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR). Unresolved ER stress with activation of the UPR initiates apoptosis. Macrophages are resistant to apoptotic stimuli, because of activity of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Macrophages express 3 Akt isoforms, Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3, which are products of distinct but homologous genes. Akt displays isoform-specific effects on atherogenesis, which vary with different vascular cell types. Loss of macrophage Akt2 promotes the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and reduces atherosclerosis. However, Akt isoforms are redundant with regard to apoptosis. c-Jun NH-terminal kinase (JNK) is a pro-apoptotic effector of the UPR, and the JNK1 isoform opposes anti-apoptotic Akt signaling. Loss of JNK1 in hematopoietic cells protects macrophages from apoptosis and accelerates early atherosclerosis. IκB kinase α (IKKα, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase family) plays an important role in mTORC2-mediated Akt signaling in macrophages, and IKKα deficiency reduces macrophage survival and suppresses early atherosclerosis. Efferocytosis involves the interaction of receptors, bridging molecules, and apoptotic cell ligands. Scavenger receptor class B type I is a critical mediator of macrophage efferocytosis via the Src/PI3K/Rac1 pathway in atherosclerosis. Agonists that resolve inflammation offer promising therapeutic potential to promote efferocytosis and prevent atherosclerotic clinical events. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2259-2268).
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Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.
Cho SH, Raybuck AL, Stengel K, Wei M, Beck TC, Volanakis E, Thomas JW, Hiebert S, Haase VH, Boothby MR
(2016) Nature 537: 234-238
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Hypoxia, Cell Proliferation, Cell Survival, Cytosine Deaminase, Germinal Center, Hypoxia, Immunoglobulin Class Switching, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Multiprotein Complexes, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added August 9, 2016
Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.
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15 MeSH Terms
Rictor/mTORC2 Drives Progression and Therapeutic Resistance of HER2-Amplified Breast Cancers.
Morrison Joly M, Hicks DJ, Jones B, Sanchez V, Estrada MV, Young C, Williams M, Rexer BN, Sarbassov dos D, Muller WJ, Brantley-Sieders D, Cook RS
(2016) Cancer Res 76: 4752-64
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Breast Neoplasms, Carrier Proteins, Disease Progression, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Heterografts, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Nude, Multiprotein Complexes, Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein, Receptor, ErbB-2, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Tissue Array Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
HER2 overexpression drives Akt signaling and cell survival and HER2-enriched breast tumors have a poor outcome when Akt is upregulated. Akt is activated by phosphorylation at T308 via PI3K and S473 via mTORC2. The importance of PI3K-activated Akt signaling is well documented in HER2-amplified breast cancer models, but the significance of mTORC2-activated Akt signaling in this setting remains uncertain. We report here that the mTORC2 obligate cofactor Rictor is enriched in HER2-amplified samples, correlating with increased phosphorylation at S473 on Akt. In invasive breast cancer specimens, Rictor expression was upregulated significantly compared with nonmalignant tissues. In a HER2/Neu mouse model of breast cancer, genetic ablation of Rictor decreased cell survival and phosphorylation at S473 on Akt, delaying tumor latency, penetrance, and burden. In HER2-amplified cells, exposure to an mTORC1/2 dual kinase inhibitor decreased Akt-dependent cell survival, including in cells resistant to lapatinib, where cytotoxicity could be restored. We replicated these findings by silencing Rictor in breast cancer cell lines, but not silencing the mTORC1 cofactor Raptor (RPTOR). Taken together, our findings establish that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling drives Akt-dependent tumor progression in HER2-amplified breast cancers, rationalizing clinical investigation of dual mTORC1/2 kinase inhibitors and developing mTORC2-specific inhibitors for use in this setting. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4752-64. ©2016 AACR.
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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