Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 11

Publication Record

Connections

Disabling Gβγ-SNAP-25 interaction in gene-targeted mice results in enhancement of long-term potentiation at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus.
Irfan M, Zurawski Z, Hamm HE, Bark C, Stanton PK
(2019) Neuroreport 30: 695-699
MeSH Terms: Animals, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Hippocampus, Long-Term Potentiation, Mice, Transgenic, Neuronal Plasticity, Synapses, Synaptic Transmission, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Temporal Lobe
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Three SNARE proteins, SNAP-25, syntaxin 1A, and VAMP2 or synaptobrevin 2, constitute the minimal functional machinery needed for the regulated secretion of neurotransmitters. Dynamic changes in the regulated release of neurotransmitters are associated with the induction of long-term plasticity at central synapses. In-vitro studies have validated the C-terminus of SNAP-25 as a target for inhibitory Gi/o-coupled G-protein coupled receptors at a number of synapses. The physiological consequences of the interaction between Gi/o proteins and SNAP-25 in the context of activity-dependent long-term synaptic plasticity are not well understood. Here, we report direct ex-vivo evidence of the involvement of the C-terminus of SNAP-25 in inducing long-term potentiation of synaptic strength at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses using a gene-targeted mouse model with truncated C-terminus (carboxyl terminus) of SNAP-25. It has been shown previously that truncation of the three extreme C-terminal residues in SNAP-25[INCREMENT]3 homozygote mice reduces its interaction with the inhibitory Gβγ subunits two-fold. In in-vitro hippocampal slices, we show that these SNAP-25[INCREMENT]3 mice express significantly larger magnitude of long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Disabling the Gβγ-SNARE interaction disrupts GPCR-mediated presynaptic inhibition, leading to physiological and behavioral phenotypes.
Zurawski Z, Thompson Gray AD, Brady LJ, Page B, Church E, Harris NA, Dohn MR, Yim YY, Hyde K, Mortlock DP, Jones CK, Winder DG, Alford S, Hamm HE
(2019) Sci Signal 12:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Exocytosis, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mice, Knockout, Neural Inhibition, Phenotype, Protein Binding, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Synaptic Transmission, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2019
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that couple to G proteins modulate neurotransmission presynaptically by inhibiting exocytosis. Release of Gβγ subunits from activated G proteins decreases the activity of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs), decreasing excitability. A less understood Gβγ-mediated mechanism downstream of Ca entry is the binding of Gβγ to SNARE complexes, which facilitate the fusion of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane in exocytosis. Here, we generated mice expressing a form of the SNARE protein SNAP25 with premature truncation of the C terminus and that were therefore partially deficient in this interaction. SNAP25Δ3 homozygote mice exhibited normal presynaptic inhibition by GABA receptors, which inhibit VGCCs, but defective presynaptic inhibition by receptors that work directly on the SNARE complex, such as 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) 5-HT receptors and adrenergic α receptors. Simultaneously stimulating receptors that act through both mechanisms showed synergistic inhibitory effects. SNAP25Δ3 homozygote mice had various behavioral phenotypes, including increased stress-induced hyperthermia, defective spatial learning, impaired gait, and supraspinal nociception. These data suggest that the inhibition of exocytosis by G-coupled GPCRs through the Gβγ-SNARE interaction is a crucial component of numerous physiological and behavioral processes.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Gβγ directly modulates vesicle fusion by competing with synaptotagmin for binding to neuronal SNARE proteins embedded in membranes.
Zurawski Z, Page B, Chicka MC, Brindley RL, Wells CA, Preininger AM, Hyde K, Gilbert JA, Cruz-Rodriguez O, Currie KPM, Chapman ER, Alford S, Hamm HE
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 12165-12177
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding, Competitive, Calcium Signaling, Cattle, Cell Line, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Humans, Lipid Bilayers, Liposomes, Membrane Fusion, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Peptide Fragments, Protein Conformation, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Multimerization, Rats, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Recombinant Proteins, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Synaptotagmin I, Syntaxin 1
Show Abstract · Added July 12, 2017
G-coupled G protein-coupled receptors can inhibit neurotransmitter release at synapses via multiple mechanisms. In addition to Gβγ-mediated modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC), inhibition can also be mediated through the direct interaction of Gβγ subunits with the soluble -ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex of the vesicle fusion apparatus. Binding studies with soluble SNARE complexes have shown that Gβγ binds to both ternary SNARE complexes, t-SNARE heterodimers, and monomeric SNAREs, competing with synaptotagmin 1(syt1) for binding sites on t-SNARE. However, in secretory cells, Gβγ, SNAREs, and synaptotagmin interact in the lipid environment of a vesicle at the plasma membrane. To approximate this environment, we show that fluorescently labeled Gβγ interacts specifically with lipid-embedded t-SNAREs consisting of full-length syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25B at the membrane, as measured by fluorescence polarization. Fluorescently labeled syt1 undergoes competition with Gβγ for SNARE-binding sites in lipid environments. Mutant Gβγ subunits that were previously shown to be more efficacious at inhibiting Ca-triggered exocytotic release than wild-type Gβγ were also shown to bind SNAREs at a higher affinity than wild type in a lipid environment. These mutant Gβγ subunits were unable to inhibit VGCC currents. Specific peptides corresponding to regions on Gβ and Gγ shown to be important for the interaction disrupt the interaction in a concentration-dependent manner. In fusion assays using full-length t- and v-SNAREs embedded in liposomes, Gβγ inhibited Ca/synaptotagmin-dependent fusion. Together, these studies demonstrate the importance of these regions for the Gβγ-SNARE interaction and show that the target of Gβγ, downstream of VGCC, is the membrane-embedded SNARE complex.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Gβγ Binds to the Extreme C Terminus of SNAP25 to Mediate the Action of Gi/o-Coupled G Protein-Coupled Receptors.
Zurawski Z, Rodriguez S, Hyde K, Alford S, Hamm HE
(2016) Mol Pharmacol 89: 75-83
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cattle, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Mice, Petromyzon, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Gi/o-coupled G protein-coupled receptors can exert an inhibitory effect on vesicle release through several G protein-driven mechanisms, more than one of which may be concurrently present in individual presynaptic terminals. The synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25) is a key downstream effector of Gβγ subunits. It has previously been shown that proteolytic cleavage of SNAP25 by botulinum toxin A reduces the ability of Gβγ to compete with the calcium sensor synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) for binding to SNAP25 in a calcium-dependent manner. These truncated SNAP25 proteins sustain a low level of exocytosis but are unable to support serotonin-mediated inhibition of exocytosis in lamprey spinal neurons. Here, we generate a SNAP25 extreme C-terminal mutant that is deficient in its ability to bind Gβγ while retaining normal calcium-dependent Syt1 binding to soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) and vesicle release. The SNAP25Δ3 mutant, in which residue G204 is replaced by a stop codon, features a partial reduction in Gβ1γ2 binding in vitro as well as a partial reduction in the ability of the lamprey 5-hydroxytryptamine1b-type serotonin receptor to reduce excitatory postsynaptic current amplitudes, an effect previously shown to be mediated through the interaction of Gβγ with SNAP25. Syt1 calcium-dependent binding to SNAP25Δ3 was reduced by a small extent compared with the wild type. We conclude that the extreme C terminus of SNAP25 is a critical region for the Gβγ-SNARE interaction.
Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
miR-153 regulates SNAP-25, synaptic transmission, and neuronal development.
Wei C, Thatcher EJ, Olena AF, Cha DJ, Perdigoto AL, Marshall AF, Carter BD, Broadie K, Patton JG
(2013) PLoS One 8: e57080
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, Exocytosis, Green Fluorescent Proteins, MicroRNAs, Motor Neurons, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, Signal Transduction, Synaptic Transmission, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
SNAP-25 is a core component of the trimeric SNARE complex mediating vesicle exocytosis during membrane addition for neuronal growth, neuropeptide/growth factor secretion, and neurotransmitter release during synaptic transmission. Here, we report a novel microRNA mechanism of SNAP-25 regulation controlling motor neuron development, neurosecretion, synaptic activity, and movement in zebrafish. Loss of miR-153 causes overexpression of SNAP-25 and consequent hyperactive movement in early zebrafish embryos. Conversely, overexpression of miR-153 causes SNAP-25 down regulation resulting in near complete paralysis, mimicking the effects of treatment with Botulinum neurotoxin. miR-153-dependent changes in synaptic activity at the neuromuscular junction are consistent with the observed movement defects. Underlying the movement defects, perturbation of miR-153 function causes dramatic developmental changes in motor neuron patterning and branching. Together, our results indicate that precise control of SNAP-25 expression by miR-153 is critically important for proper neuronal patterning as well as neurotransmission.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Gβγ inhibits exocytosis via interaction with critical residues on soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein-25.
Wells CA, Zurawski Z, Betke KM, Yim YY, Hyde K, Rodriguez S, Alford S, Hamm HE
(2012) Mol Pharmacol 82: 1136-49
MeSH Terms: Alanine, Animals, Binding Sites, Botulinum Toxins, Calcium, Cell Line, Exocytosis, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Lampreys, Mutation, Neurons, Peptides, Protein Binding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, SNARE Proteins, Sf9 Cells, Spodoptera, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Synaptotagmin I, Syntaxin 1
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Spatial and temporal regulation of neurotransmitter release is a complex process accomplished by the exocytotic machinery working in tandem with numerous regulatory proteins. G-protein βγ dimers regulate the core process of exocytosis by interacting with the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein-25 (SNAP-25), syntaxin 1A, and synaptobrevin. Gβγ binding to ternary SNAREs overlaps with calcium-dependent binding of synaptotagmin, inhibiting synaptotagmin-1 binding and fusion of the synaptic vesicle. To further explore the binding sites of Gβγ on SNAP-25, peptides based on the sequence of SNAP-25 were screened for Gβγ binding. Peptides that bound Gβγ were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis to determine their relevance to the Gβγ-SNAP-25 interaction. Peptides from this screen were tested in protein-protein interaction assays for their ability to modulate the interaction of Gβγ with SNAP-25. A peptide from the C terminus, residues 193 to 206, significantly inhibited the interaction. In addition, Ala mutants of SNAP-25 residues from the C terminus of SNAP-25, as well as from the amino-terminal region decreased binding to Gβ₁γ₁. When SNAP-25 with eight residues mutated to alanine was assembled with syntaxin 1A, there was significantly reduced affinity of this mutated t-SNARE for Gβγ, but it still interacted with synaptotagmin-1 in a Ca²⁺ -dependent manner and reconstituted evoked exocytosis in botulinum neurotoxin E-treated neurons. However, the mutant SNAP-25 could no longer support 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated inhibition of exocytosis.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
22 MeSH Terms
Inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.
Shi J, Wang Q, Johansson JU, Liang X, Woodling NS, Priyam P, Loui TM, Merchant M, Breyer RM, Montine TJ, Andreasson K
(2012) Ann Neurol 72: 788-98
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases, Brain, Calcium-Binding Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Cognitive Dysfunction, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Encephalitis, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microfilament Proteins, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Mutation, Neurons, Oxidative Stress, Peptide Fragments, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP3 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 2
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2013
OBJECTIVE - There is significant evidence for a central role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of developing AD in healthy aging populations. As NSAIDs inhibit the enzymatic activity of the inflammatory cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2, these findings suggest that downstream prostaglandin signaling pathways function in the preclinical development of AD. Here, we investigate the function of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) signaling through its EP3 receptor in the neuroinflammatory response to Aβ peptide.
METHODS - The function of PGE(2) signaling through its EP3 receptor was examined in vivo in a model of subacute neuroinflammation induced by administration of Aβ(42) peptides. Our findings were then confirmed in young adult APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice.
RESULTS - Deletion of the PGE(2) EP3 receptor in a model of Aβ(42) peptide-induced neuroinflammation reduced proinflammatory gene expression, cytokine production, and oxidative stress. In the APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 model of familial AD, deletion of the EP3 receptor blocked induction of proinflammatory gene and protein expression and lipid peroxidation. In addition, levels of Aβ peptides were significantly decreased, as were β-secretase and β C-terminal fragment levels, suggesting that generation of Aβ peptides may be increased as a result of proinflammatory EP3 signaling. Finally, deletion of EP3 receptor significantly reversed the decline in presynaptic proteins seen in APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 mice.
INTERPRETATION - Our findings identify the PGE(2) EP3 receptor as a novel proinflammatory, proamyloidogenic, and synaptotoxic signaling pathway, and suggest a role for COX-PGE(2) -EP3 signaling in the development of AD.
Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.
2 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
37 MeSH Terms
Murine CENPF interacts with syntaxin 4 in the regulation of vesicular transport.
Pooley RD, Moynihan KL, Soukoulis V, Reddy S, Francis R, Lo C, Ma LJ, Bader DM
(2008) J Cell Sci 121: 3413-21
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Transport, COS Cells, Cell Membrane, Chlorocebus aethiops, Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone, Cytoplasm, Glucose Transporter Type 4, Mice, Microfilament Proteins, Microtubules, NIH 3T3 Cells, Qa-SNARE Proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Transport Vesicles, Two-Hybrid System Techniques, Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 2
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Syntaxin 4 is a component of the SNARE complex that regulates membrane docking and fusion. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identify a novel interaction between syntaxin 4 and cytoplasmic murine CENPF, a protein previously demonstrated to associate with the microtubule network and SNAP-25. The binding domain for syntaxin 4 in CENPF was defined by yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Confocal analyses in cell culture reveal a high degree of colocalization between endogenously expressed proteins in interphase cells. Additionally, the endogenous SNARE proteins can be isolated as a complex with CENPF in immunoprecipitation experiments. Further analyses demonstrate that murine CENPF and syntaxin 4 colocalize with components of plasma membrane recycling: SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Depletion of endogenous CENPF disrupts GLUT4 trafficking whereas expression of a dominant-negative form of CENPF inhibits cell coupling. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that CENPF provides a direct link between proteins of the SNARE system and the microtubule network and indicate a diverse role for murine CENPF in vesicular transport.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Gbetagamma interferes with Ca2+-dependent binding of synaptotagmin to the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex.
Yoon EJ, Gerachshenko T, Spiegelberg BD, Alford S, Hamm HE
(2007) Mol Pharmacol 72: 1210-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Cattle, Exocytosis, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Lampreys, SNARE Proteins, Serotonin, Spinal Cord, Synapses, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Synaptotagmin I, Syntaxin 1, Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 2
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Presynaptic inhibitory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can decrease neurotransmission by inducing interaction of Gbetagamma with the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. We have shown that this action of Gbetagamma requires the carboxyl terminus of the 25-kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) and is downstream of the well known inhibition of Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated calcium channels. We propose a mechanism in which Gbetagamma and synaptotagmin compete for binding to the SNARE complex. Here, we characterized the Gbetagamma interaction sites on syntaxin1A and SNAP25 and demonstrated an overlap of the Gbetagamma- and synaptotagmin I -binding regions on each member of the SNARE complex. Synaptotagmin competes in a Ca2+-sensitive manner with binding of Gbetagamma to SNAP25, syntaxin1A, and the assembled SNARE complex. We predict, based on these findings, that at high intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, Ca2+-synaptotagmin I can displace Gbetagamma binding and the Gbetagamma-dependent inhibition of exocytosis can be blocked. We tested this hypothesis in giant synapses of the lamprey spinal cord, where 5-HT works via Gbetagamma to inhibit neurotransmission (Blackmer et al., 2001). We showed that increased presynaptic Ca2+ suppresses the 5-HT- and Gbetagamma-dependent inhibition of exocytosis. We suggest that this effect may be due to Ca2+-dependent competition between Gbetagamma and synaptotagmin I for SNARE binding. This type of dynamic regulation may represent a novel mechanism for modifying transmitter release in a graded manner based on the history of action potentials that increase intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and of inhibitory signals through G(i)-coupled GPCRs.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
CytLEK1 is a regulator of plasma membrane recycling through its interaction with SNAP-25.
Pooley RD, Reddy S, Soukoulis V, Roland JT, Goldenring JR, Bader DM
(2006) Mol Biol Cell 17: 3176-86
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Membrane, Cells, Cultured, Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone, Endosomes, Mice, Microfilament Proteins, Microtubules, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Protein Transport, Sequence Deletion, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Transferrin, Two-Hybrid System Techniques
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2013
SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex that is involved in membrane docking and fusion. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identify a novel interaction between SNAP-25 and cytoplasmic Lek1 (cytLEK1), a protein previously demonstrated to associate with the microtubule network. The binding domains within each protein were defined by yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and colocalization studies. Confocal analyses reveal a high degree of colocalization between the proteins. In addition, the endogenous proteins can be isolated as a complex by immunoprecipitation. Further analyses demonstrate that cytLEK1 and SNAP-25 colocalize and coprecipitate with Rab11a, myosin Vb, VAMP2, and syntaxin 4, components of the plasma membrane recycling pathway. Overexpression of the SNAP-25-binding domain of cytLEK1, and depletion of endogenous Lek1 alters transferrin trafficking, consistent with a function in vesicle recycling. Taken together, our studies indicate that cytLEK1 is a link between recycling vesicles and the microtubule network through its association with SNAP-25. This interaction may play a key role in the regulation of the recycling endosome pathway.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms