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Cyt-Geist: Current and Future Challenges in Cytometry: Reports of the CYTO 2019 Conference Workshops.
Czechowska K, Lannigan J, Aghaeepour N, Back JB, Begum J, Behbehani G, Bispo C, Bitoun D, Fernández AB, Boova ST, Brinkman RR, Ciccolella CO, Cotleur B, Davies D, Dela Cruz GV, Del Rio-Guerra R, Des Lauriers-Cox AM, Douagi I, Dumrese C, Bonilla Escobar DL, Estevam J, Ewald C, Fossum A, Gaudillière B, Green C, Groves C, Hall C, Haque Y, Hedrick MN, Hogg K, Hsieh EWY, Irish J, Lederer J, Leipold M, Lewis-Tuffin LJ, Litwin V, Lopez P, Nasdala I, Nedbal J, Ohlsson-Wilhelm BM, Price KM, Rahman AH, Rayanki R, Rieger AM, Robinson JP, Shapiro H, Sun YS, Tang VA, Tesfa L, Telford WG, Walker R, Welsh JA, Wheeler P, Tárnok A
(2019) Cytometry A 95: 1236-1274
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clinical Trials as Topic, Flow Cytometry, Fluorescence, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Inventions, Reproducibility of Results, Stem Cells, Surveys and Questionnaires
Added June 8, 2020
3 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Women With Overactive Bladder Exhibit More Unhealthy Toileting Behaviors: A Cross-sectional Study.
Daily AM, Kowalik CG, Delpe SD, Kaufman MR, Dmochowski RR, Reynolds WS
(2019) Urology 134: 97-102
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bathroom Equipment, Behavioral Symptoms, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Quality of Life, Risk Factors, Self Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, Symptom Assessment, United States, Urinary Bladder, Overactive, Urinary Incontinence, Urge, Urination
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To determine whether women overactive bladder symptoms would report more frequent unhealthy toileting behaviors.
METHODS - A community-based sample of adult women was electronically recruited to complete the Toileting Behavior Scale and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Overactive Bladder module, as well as clinical and demographic questionnaires. The associations between overactive bladder and toileting behavior subscales were assessed as continuous variables using Spearman's rank correlation and as dichotomous variables with multivariable logistic regression.
RESULTS - Of the 6562 adult women included in the analytic sample, 1059 (16.1%) were classified as having overactive bladder. Of the toileting behavior subscales, convenience voiding had the highest, positive association with overactive bladder score (r = 0.301, P < .0001). On multivariable logistic regression, women with overactive bladder (OAB) were more likely to report behaviors of convenience voiding (odds ratio [OR] 1.13, confidence intervals [CI] 1.11-1.15), delayed voiding (OR 1.05, CI 1.02-1.08), straining to void (OR 1.05, CI 1.03-1.07), and position preference (OR 1.13, CI 1.08-1.18).
CONCLUSION - OAB symptoms were associated with specific toileting behaviors of convenience voiding, delayed voiding, straining to void, and position preference. Further investigation is needed to determine if toileting behaviors are a risk factor for OAB or a compensatory adaptation to mitigate symptoms.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
The impact of frailty on treatment for overactive bladder in older adults.
Suskind AM, Kowalik C, Quanstrom K, Boscardin J, Zhao S, Reynolds WS, Mishra K, Finlayson E
(2019) Neurourol Urodyn 38: 1915-1923
MeSH Terms: Aged, Botulinum Toxins, Type A, Electric Stimulation Therapy, Female, Frailty, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Postural Balance, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome, Urinary Bladder, Overactive, Urological Agents
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
AIMS - To examine the impact of frailty on treatment outcomes for overactive bladder (OAB) in older adults starting pharmacotherapy, onabotulinumtoxinA, and sacral neuromodulation.
METHODS - This is a prospective study of men and women age ≥60 years starting pharmacotherapy, onabotulinumtoxinA, or sacral neuromodulation. Subjects were administered questionnaires at baseline and again at 1- and 3-months. Frailty was assessed at baseline using the timed up and go test (TUGT), whereby a TUGT time of ≥12 seconds was considered to be slow, or frail. Response to treatment was assessed using the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) and the OAB-q SF (both Bother and HRQOL subscales). Information on side effects/adverse events was also collected. Mixed effects linear modeling was used to model changes in outcomes over time both within and between groups.
RESULTS - A total of 45 subjects enrolled in the study, 40% (N = 18) of whom had a TUGT ≥12 seconds. Both TUGT groups demonstrated improvement in OAB symptoms over time and there were no statistically significant differences in these responses per group (all P-values >.05). Similar trends were found for both OAB-q SF Bother and OAB-q SF HRQOL questionnaire responses. Side effects and adverse events were not significantly different between groups (all P's >.05).
CONCLUSIONS - Adults ≥60 years of age starting second- and third-line treatments for OAB, regardless of TUGT time, demonstrated improvement in OAB symptoms at 3 months. These findings suggest that frail older adults may receive comparable benefit and similar rates of side effects compared with less frail older individuals.
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Toileting Behaviors and Bladder Symptoms in Women Who Limit Restroom Use at Work: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Reynolds WS, Kowalik C, Delpe SD, Kaufman M, Fowke JH, Dmochowski R
(2019) J Urol 202: 1008-1014
MeSH Terms: Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Habits, Humans, Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, Surveys and Questionnaires, Toilet Facilities, United States, Urination
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
PURPOSE - While lower urinary tract symptoms and bladder behaviors are known to be associated with certain occupations, little is known about restroom access or environmental factors which may contribute to this relationship. We aimed to characterize reasons that women limit restroom use at work. We also sought to determine whether women who limit use at work report more unhealthy bladder habits and lower urinary tract symptoms.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We performed a cross-sectional study of full-time working women in the United States. Women completed validated questionnaires recording toileting behaviors, lower urinary tract symptoms and perceptions of the occupational toilet environment. We compared women who limited restroom use at work most or all of the time to those who did not limit or did so occasionally or sometimes.
RESULTS - Of the 3,062 women in the final analytical sample 11% reported limiting restroom use at work most or all of the time. This group reported lower satisfaction with restroom cleanliness and privacy in particular. They more frequently identified toilet factors of poor quality, limited accessibility and restricted use by employer. The prevalence of unhealthy bladder habits was significantly higher among women who limited restroom use, as was the prevalence of urgency, monthly urinary incontinence and infrequent voiding.
CONCLUSIONS - In this cross-sectional study of women working full time those who limited restroom use at work reported a higher prevalence of unhealthy bladder habits and certain urinary disorders. Future studies should determine whether limited restroom use at work is a modifiable risk factor for unhealthy bladder habits and bladder health outcomes.
0 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Mediate the Effects of Trauma Exposure on Clinical Indicators of Central Sensitization in Patients With Chronic Pain.
McKernan LC, Johnson BN, Crofford LJ, Lumley MA, Bruehl S, Cheavens JS
(2019) Clin J Pain 35: 385-393
MeSH Terms: Adult, Central Nervous System Sensitization, Chronic Pain, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Self Report, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
OBJECTIVE - Evidence supports high rates of co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic pain disorders involving central sensitization (CS). The nature of this relationship, however, remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we aimed to (1) assess how both trauma exposure and current PTSD symptoms are related to clinical manifestations of CS, and (2) test whether PTSD symptoms explain the relationship between trauma exposure and CS. Because experiential avoidance has been shown to impact the relationship between trauma and health outcomes, we (3) explored experiential avoidance as a possible mediator or moderator of the trauma-CS relationship.
METHODS - A sample of 202 adult patients (79% female) with chronic pain completed validated self-report measures of trauma exposure, current PTSD symptoms, experiential avoidance, and 3 manifestations of CS: widespread pain, greater pain severity, and polysomatic symptom reporting. We used path analysis and multivariate regression to assess our study aims.
RESULTS - Both trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with all 3 clinical indicators of CS. PTSD symptoms partially explained the relationship between trauma exposure and widespread pain, pain intensity, and polysomatic symptoms. Experiential avoidance did not mediate or moderate the trauma-CS relationship.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings suggest that trauma exposure is linked to elevated clinical markers of CS but a critical factor in this relationship is the mediating effect of current PTSD symptoms.
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10 MeSH Terms
Cardiovascular reactivity and psychological hyperarousal in hot flash-associated insomnia disorder.
Bertisch SM, Wiley A, McCormick K, Muresan C, Camuso J, Albert K, Crawford SL, Newhouse P, Taylor JA, Joffe H
(2019) Menopause 26: 728-740
MeSH Terms: Aged, Anxiety Disorders, Arousal, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cardiovascular System, Cognition, Female, Heart Rate, Hot Flashes, Humans, Menopause, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Sleep, Sleep Arousal Disorders, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVES - Given the neurocognitive hyperarousal observed in patients with insomnia disorder and associations of nocturnal hot flashes with cardiovascular disease risk, we examined whether women with hot flash-associated insomnia disorder demonstrate exaggerated cardiovascular responsivity to acute stressors, and also a profile of psychological hyperarousal.
METHODS - Peri and postmenopausal women with and without hot flash-associated insomnia disorder underwent assessments of cardiovascular autonomic responsivity to acute stress paradigms and psychological hyperarousal. Hemodynamic responses (heart rate, blood pressure) to nociceptive, social-evaluative, and cognitive stress paradigms were measured in the morning. Psychological hyperarousal was evaluated using questionnaires assessing daytime and presleep hyperarousal, anxiety, and sleep-related cognitions.
RESULTS - Women (25 with and 15 without hot flash-associated insomnia) aged 53.4 ± 4.8 years reported a range of insomnia symptoms. Resting-state hemodynamics were similar between groups. Heart rate and blood pressure responses to stress paradigms did not differ by group nor did they correlate with insomnia severity. Women with insomnia disorder had higher generalized anxiety disorder scores (mean 2.7 ± 3.0 vs 1.0 ± 1.4; P = 0.05) and sleep-related cognitions than those without insomnia (P ≤ 0.05). Insomnia symptom severity was moderately correlated with presleep and daytime hyperarousal, anxiety, and sleep-related cognition (all r ≥ 0.43).
CONCLUSIONS - Though hot flash-associated insomnia is characterized by psychological hyperarousal before sleep and during the daytime, it does not relate to cardiovascular responsiveness to acute stressors. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that altered cardiovascular control is a potential mechanism by which hot flash-associated insomnia confers higher cardiovascular disease risk.
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18 MeSH Terms
The Effects of Pain Severity, Pain Catastrophizing, Depression, and Exercise on Perceived Disability in Acute Low Back Pain Patients.
Salt E, Wiggins AT, Hooker Q, Crofford L, Rayens MK, Segerstrom S
(2018) Res Theory Nurs Pract 32: 436-448
MeSH Terms: Adult, Catastrophization, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depressive Disorder, Disabled Persons, Exercise, Female, Humans, Low Back Pain, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Psychological, Pain Measurement, Severity of Illness Index, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
The effectiveness of cognitive treatments for low back pain, a prevalent and costly condition, are commonly based on the principles of the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury. In this model, persons with a painful injury/experience who also engage in pain catastrophizing are most likely to avoid activity leading to disability. The validation of this model in patients with acute low back is limited. The purpose of this project was to examine the relationship of perceived disability with variables identified in the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury such as, pain severity, pain catastrophizing, depression, and exercise in persons with acute low back pain. A multiple linear regression model was used to assess the association of perceived disability with pain severity, pain catastrophizing, depression, and exercise at baseline among subjects with acute low back pain ( = 44) participating in a randomized clinical trial to prevent transition to chronic low back pain. Controlling for age, the overall model was significant for perceived disability ([5, 35] = 14.2; < .001). Higher scores of pain catastrophizing ( = .003) and pain severity ( < .001) were associated with higher perceived disability levels. Exercise and depression were not significantly associated with perceived disability. The use of the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury in acute LBP patients is appropriate; because this model is commonly used as rationale for the effectiveness of cognitive treatments, these findings have clinical relevance in the treatment of this condition.
© 2018 Springer Publishing Company, LLC.
0 Communities
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MeSH Terms
The association between endogenous opioid function and morphine responsiveness: a moderating role for endocannabinoids.
Bruehl S, Burns JW, Morgan A, Koltyn K, Gupta R, Buvanendran A, Edwards D, Chont M, Kingsley PJ, Marnett L, Stone A, Patel S
(2019) Pain 160: 676-687
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analgesics, Opioid, Chronic Pain, Double-Blind Method, Endocannabinoids, Exercise, Female, Humans, Low Back Pain, Male, Middle Aged, Morphine, Naloxone, Opioid Peptides, Pain Measurement, Regression Analysis, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
We sought to replicate previous findings that low endogenous opioid (EO) function predicts greater morphine analgesia and extended these findings by examining whether circulating endocannabinoids and related lipids moderate EO-related predictive effects. Individuals with chronic low-back pain (n = 46) provided blood samples for endocannabinoid analyses, then underwent separate identical laboratory sessions under 3 drug conditions: saline placebo, intravenous (i.v.) naloxone (opioid antagonist; 12-mg total), and i.v. morphine (0.09-mg/kg total). During each session, participants rated low-back pain intensity, evoked heat pain intensity, and nonpain subjective effects 4 times in sequence after incremental drug dosing. Mean morphine effects (morphine-placebo difference) and opioid blockade effects (naloxone-placebo difference; to index EO function) for each primary outcome (low-back pain intensity, evoked heat pain intensity, and nonpain subjective effects) were derived by averaging across the 4 incremental doses. The association between EO function and morphine-induced back pain relief was significantly moderated by endocannabinoids [2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA)]. Lower EO function predicted greater morphine analgesia only for those with relatively lower endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids also significantly moderated EO effects on morphine-related changes in visual analog scale-evoked pain intensity (2-AG), drug liking (AEA and 2-AG), and desire to take again (AEA and 2-AG). In the absence of significant interactions, lower EO function predicted significantly greater morphine analgesia (as in past work) and euphoria. Results indicate that EO effects on analgesic and subjective responses to opioid medications are greatest when endocannabinoid levels are low. These findings may help guide development of mechanism-based predictors for personalized pain medicine algorithms.
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18 MeSH Terms
Training the physician-scientist: views from program directors and aspiring young investigators.
Williams CS, Iness AN, Baron RM, Ajijola OA, Hu PJ, Vyas JM, Baiocchi R, Adami AJ, Lever JM, Klein PS, Demer L, Madaio M, Geraci M, Brass LF, Blanchard M, Salata R, Zaidi M
(2018) JCI Insight 3:
MeSH Terms: Awards and Prizes, Biomedical Research, Career Choice, Charities, Education, Education, Medical, Education, Medical, Graduate, Foundations, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Research Personnel, Societies, Medical, Students, Medical, Surveys and Questionnaires, Training Support, United States, Workforce
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
There is growing concern that the physician-scientist is endangered due to a leaky training pipeline and prolonged time to scientific independence (1). The NIH Physician-Scientist Workforce Working Group has concluded that as many as 1,000 individuals will need to enter the pipeline each year to sustain the workforce (2). Moreover, surveys of postgraduate training programs document considerable variability in disposition and infrastructure (3). Programs can be broadly grouped into two classes: physician-scientist training programs (PSTPs) that span residency and fellowship training, and research-in-residency programs (RiRs), which are limited to residency but trainees are able to match into PSTPs upon transitioning to fellowship (Figure 1). Funding sources for RiRs and PSTPs are varied and include NIH KL2 and T32 awards, charitable foundations, philanthropy, and institutional support. Furthermore, standards for research training and tools for evaluating programmatic success are lacking. Here, we share consensus generated from iterative workshops hosted by the Alliance of Academic Internal Medicine (AAIM) and the student-led American Physician Scientists Association (APSA).
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18 MeSH Terms
Posttraumatic stress disorder in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: Relationship to patient phenotype and clinical practice implications.
McKernan LC, Johnson BN, Reynolds WS, Williams DA, Cheavens JS, Dmochowski RR, Crofford LJ
(2019) Neurourol Urodyn 38: 353-362
MeSH Terms: Adult, Chronic Pain, Comorbidity, Cystitis, Interstitial, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Phenotype, Prevalence, Quality of Life, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2019
PURPOSE - The relationship between exposure to abuse and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is well-documented. However, studies have yet to examine posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which develops following exposure to trauma and worsens health outcomes in chronic pain. We aimed to assess the prevalence and impact of PTSD in patients with IC/BPS, including their relation to genitourinary symptom presentation and widespread pain phenotype.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We recruited 202 participants with chronic pain from an academic medical center and classified 64 individuals as IC/BPS based on validated epidemiological criteria. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires assessing trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, emotional distress, pain, and urinary symptoms. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests assessed study aims comparing IC/BPS to other chronic pain.
RESULTS - Although elevated, IC/BPS trauma exposure rates were equivalent to that of other chronic pain conditions in the sample. Despite this equivalence, in comparison, IC/BPS patients had significantly higher rates of PTSD symptoms, with 42% meeting provisional diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Among IC/BPS, those meeting provisional criteria for PTSD had significantly higher incidence of lifetime sexual abuse, childhood trauma, and presentations consistent with the widespread pain phenotype. In IC/BPS, there was no association between PTSD and genitourinary symptoms, but provisional PTSD was associated with more pain, emotional distress, and poorer quality of life.
CONCLUSIONS - We recommend that patients with IC/BPS and widespread pain have ongoing screening and monitoring of PTSD. We recommend using trauma-informed care practices with these patients to increase trust and safety, which could improve treatment compliance and follow-up.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms