Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 91

Publication Record

Connections

Gastric Carcinomas With Lymphoid Stroma: Categorization and Comparison With Solid-Type Colonic Carcinomas.
Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Revetta F, McMahon LA, Washington K
(2017) Am J Clin Pathol 148: 477-484
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Colonic Neoplasms, Epstein-Barr Virus Infections, Female, Humans, Lymphocytes, Male, Microsatellite Instability, Middle Aged, Stomach Neoplasms, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Objectives - To determine whether histologic features could help identify gastric carcinomas with lymphoid stroma associated with microsatellite instability (MSI) (ie, "medullary carcinomas"), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (termed lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas in other organ systems), or neither.
Methods - We identified 17 solid-type gastric carcinomas with lymphoid stroma, assessed EBV and MSI status, and compared features across groups. We also compared them with 51 solid-type colorectal adenocarcinomas.
Results - In the stomach, EBV-associated carcinomas (n = 8) contained intratumoral germinal centers (P = .024) and eosinophils (P = .030) and lacked necrosis (P = .019) compared with MSI-associated carcinomas (n = 5) and non-EBV, non-MSI carcinomas (n = 4). In the colon, MSI-driven carcinomas (n = 40) more frequently contained intratumoral lymphocytes (P = .017) and neutrophils (P = .0050) and less often metastasized to distant sites (P = .0040) than poorly differentiated carcinomas lacking MSI (n = 11).
Conclusions - Morphology may help classify gastric carcinomas with lymphoid stroma, although ancillary testing appears more reliable. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma and medullary carcinoma should not be used interchangeably.
© American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylation in FOXD1 lineage cells is essential for normal kidney development.
Kobayashi H, Liu J, Urrutia AA, Burmakin M, Ishii K, Rajan M, Davidoff O, Saifudeen Z, Haase VH
(2017) Kidney Int 92: 1370-1383
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Hypoxia, Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Inhibitors, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Humans, Hydroxylation, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Mice, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Organ Size, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Renal Insufficiency, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2017
Hypoxia in the embryo is a frequent cause of intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight, and multiple organ defects. In the kidney, this can lead to low nephron endowment, predisposing to chronic kidney disease and arterial hypertension. A key component in cellular adaptation to hypoxia is the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, which is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3. In the adult kidney, PHD oxygen sensors are differentially expressed in a cell type-dependent manner and control the production of erythropoietin in interstitial cells. However, the role of interstitial cell PHDs in renal development has not been examined. Here we used a genetic approach in mice to interrogate PHD function in FOXD1-expressing stroma during nephrogenesis. We demonstrate that PHD2 and PHD3 are essential for normal kidney development as the combined inactivation of stromal PHD2 and PHD3 resulted in renal failure that was associated with reduced kidney size, decreased numbers of glomeruli, and abnormal postnatal nephron formation. In contrast, nephrogenesis was normal in animals with individual PHD inactivation. We furthermore demonstrate that the defect in nephron formation in PHD2/PHD3 double mutants required intact hypoxia-inducible factor-2 signaling and was dependent on the extent of stromal hypoxia-inducible factor activation. Thus, hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylation in renal interstitial cells is critical for normal nephron formation.
Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Colorectal Cancer Cell Line Proteomes Are Representative of Primary Tumors and Predict Drug Sensitivity.
Wang J, Mouradov D, Wang X, Jorissen RN, Chambers MC, Zimmerman LJ, Vasaikar S, Love CG, Li S, Lowes K, Leuchowius KJ, Jousset H, Weinstock J, Yau C, Mariadason J, Shi Z, Ban Y, Chen X, Coffey RJC, Slebos RJC, Burgess AW, Liebler DC, Zhang B, Sieber OM
(2017) Gastroenterology 153: 1082-1095
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromatography, Liquid, Colorectal Neoplasms, Databases, Protein, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Mutation, Neoplasm Proteins, Patient Selection, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Precision Medicine, Proteome, Proteomics, Signal Transduction, Stromal Cells, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Transcriptome, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Proteomics holds promise for individualizing cancer treatment. We analyzed to what extent the proteomic landscape of human colorectal cancer (CRC) is maintained in established CRC cell lines and the utility of proteomics for predicting therapeutic responses.
METHODS - Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses were performed on 44 CRC cell lines, compared against primary CRCs (n=95) and normal tissues (n=60), and integrated with genomic and drug sensitivity data.
RESULTS - Cell lines mirrored the proteomic aberrations of primary tumors, in particular for intrinsic programs. Tumor relationships of protein expression with DNA copy number aberrations and signatures of post-transcriptional regulation were recapitulated in cell lines. The 5 proteomic subtypes previously identified in tumors were represented among cell lines. Nonetheless, systematic differences between cell line and tumor proteomes were apparent, attributable to stroma, extrinsic signaling, and growth conditions. Contribution of tumor stroma obscured signatures of DNA mismatch repair identified in cell lines with a hypermutation phenotype. Global proteomic data showed improved utility for predicting both known drug-target relationships and overall drug sensitivity as compared with genomic or transcriptomic measurements. Inhibition of targetable proteins associated with drug responses further identified corresponding synergistic or antagonistic drug combinations. Our data provide evidence for CRC proteomic subtype-specific drug responses.
CONCLUSIONS - Proteomes of established CRC cell line are representative of primary tumors. Proteomic data tend to exhibit improved prediction of drug sensitivity as compared with genomic and transcriptomic profiles. Our integrative proteogenomic analysis highlights the potential of proteome profiling to inform personalized cancer medicine.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Current concepts in maternal-fetal immunology: Recognition and response to microbial pathogens by decidual stromal cells.
Anders AP, Gaddy JA, Doster RS, Aronoff DM
(2017) Am J Reprod Immunol 77:
MeSH Terms: Chorioamnionitis, Decidua, Female, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Immunity, Maternally-Acquired, Infection, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Nod1 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Pregnancy, Receptors, Pattern Recognition, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Chorioamnionitis is an acute inflammation of the gestational (extraplacental) membranes, most commonly caused by ascending microbial infection. It is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes including preterm birth, neonatal sepsis, and cerebral palsy. The decidua is the outermost layer of the gestational membranes and is likely an important initial site of contact with microbes during ascending infection. However, little is known about how decidual stromal cells (DSCs) respond to microbial threat. Defining the contributions of individual cell types to the complex medley of inflammatory signals during chorioamnionitis could lead to improved interventions aimed at halting this disease. We review available published data supporting the role for DSCs in responding to microbial infection, with a special focus on their expression of pattern recognition receptors and evidence of their responsiveness to pathogen sensing. While DSCs likely play an important role in sensing and responding to infection during the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis, important knowledge gaps and areas for future research are highlighted.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Androgen receptor differentially regulates the proliferation of prostatic epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo.
Yang S, Jiang M, Grabowska MM, Li J, Connelly ZM, Zhang J, Hayward SW, Cates JM, Han G, Yu X
(2016) Oncotarget 7: 70404-70419
MeSH Terms: Androgens, Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Cell Proliferation, Coculture Techniques, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Male, Mice, Nude, Prostate, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc, Rats, Receptors, Androgen, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Androgens regulate the proliferation and differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells, including prostate cancer (PCa) cells in a context-dependent manner. Androgens and androgen receptor (AR) do not invariably promote cell proliferation; in the normal adult, endogenous stromal and epithelial AR activation maintains differentiation and inhibits organ growth. In the current study, we report that activation of AR differentially regulates the proliferation of human prostate epithelial progenitor cells, NHPrE1, in vitro and in vivo. Inducing AR signaling in NHPrE1 cells suppressed cell proliferation in vitro, concomitant with a reduction in MYC expression. However, ectopic expression of AR in vivo stimulated cell proliferation and induced development of invasive PCa in tissue recombinants consisting of NHPrE1/AR cells and rat urogenital mesenchymal (UGM) cells, engrafted under renal capsule of adult male athymic mice. Expression of MYC increased in the NHPrE1/AR recombinant tissues, in contrast to the reduction seen in vitro. The inhibitory effect of AR signaling on cell proliferation in vitro were reduced by co-culturing NHPrE1/AR epithelial cells with prostatic stromal cells. In conclusion, these studies revealed that AR signaling differentially regulates proliferation of human prostatic epithelia cells in vitro and in vivo through mechanisms involving stromal/epithelial interactions.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection.
Lehmann BD, Jovanović B, Chen X, Estrada MV, Johnson KN, Shyr Y, Moses HL, Sanders ME, Pietenpol JA
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0157368
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Computational Biology, Datasets as Topic, Disease Progression, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Laser Capture Microdissection, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, Microarray Analysis, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Proteins, Retrospective Studies, Stromal Cells, Survival Analysis, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 9, 2017
Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical trials designed to test the hypothesis that improved outcomes can be achieved for TNBC patients, if selection and combination of existing chemotherapies is directed by knowledge of molecular TNBC subtypes.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin.
Kobayashi H, Liu Q, Binns TC, Urrutia AA, Davidoff O, Kapitsinou PP, Pfaff AS, Olauson H, Wernerson A, Fogo AB, Fong GH, Gross KW, Haase VH
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 1926-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Erythropoietin, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases, Kidney, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2016
Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2-/- renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2-/- mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3, Mediated Remodeling of the Tumor Microenvironment Results in Enhanced Tumor Drug Delivery in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer.
Nagathihalli NS, Castellanos JA, Shi C, Beesetty Y, Reyzer ML, Caprioli R, Chen X, Walsh AJ, Skala MC, Moses HL, Merchant NB
(2015) Gastroenterology 149: 1932-1943.e9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Cell Line, Tumor, Collagen, Deoxycytidine, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Humans, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Nude, Mice, Transgenic, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Osteonectin, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Pyrazoles, Pyrimidines, Receptor, Transforming Growth Factor-beta Type II, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Signal Transduction, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Stromal Cells, Time Factors, Transcription Factors, Transfection, Tumor Burden, Tumor Microenvironment, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2015
BACKGROUND & AIMS - A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the presence of a dense desmoplastic reaction (stroma) that impedes drug delivery to the tumor. Attempts to deplete the tumor stroma have resulted in formation of more aggressive tumors. We have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 as a biomarker of resistance to cytotoxic and molecularly targeted therapy in PDAC. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of targeting STAT3 on the PDAC stroma and on therapeutic resistance.
METHODS - Activated STAT3 protein expression was determined in human pancreatic tissues and tumor cell lines. In vivo effects of AZD1480, a JAK/STAT3 inhibitor, gemcitabine or the combination were determined in Ptf1a(cre/+);LSL-Kras(G12D/+);Tgfbr2(flox/flox) (PKT) mice and in orthotopic tumor xenografts. Drug delivery was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry. Collagen second harmonic generation imaging quantified tumor collagen alignment and density.
RESULTS - STAT3 activation correlates with decreased survival and advanced tumor stage in patients with PDAC. STAT3 inhibition combined with gemcitabine significantly inhibits tumor growth in both an orthotopic and the PKT mouse model of PDAC. This combined therapy attenuates in vivo expression of SPARC, increases microvessel density, and enhances drug delivery to the tumor without depletion of stromal collagen or hyaluronan. Instead, the PDAC tumors demonstrate vascular normalization, remodeling of the tumor stroma, and down-regulation of cytidine deaminase.
CONCLUSIONS - Targeted inhibition of STAT3 combined with gemcitabine enhances in vivo drug delivery and therapeutic response in PDAC. These effects occur through tumor stromal remodeling and down-regulation of cytidine deaminase without depletion of tumor stromal content.
Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
33 MeSH Terms
Host and tumor derived MMP13 regulate extravasation and establishment of colorectal metastases in the liver.
Mendonsa AM, VanSaun MN, Ustione A, Piston DW, Fingleton BM, Gorden DL
(2015) Mol Cancer 14: 49
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Movement, Colorectal Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Fatty Liver, Gene Expression, Humans, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Matrix Metalloproteinase 13, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added May 12, 2015
BACKGROUND - Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases in the United States and worldwide. Our studies have previously shown an increase in metastatic burden in steatotic vs. normal livers using a mouse model of diet induced steatosis. In the present study we aim to identify and evaluate the molecular factors responsible for this increase in tumor burden.
METHODS - We assessed changes in expression of a panel of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) using qRT-PCR between normal and steatotic livers and validated them with western blot analysis of protein levels. To evaluate the role of MMP13 on tumor development, we utilized a splenic injection model of liver metastasis in Wildtype and Mmp13 deficient mice, using either parental or stable Mmp13 knockdown cell lines. Further, to evaluate changes in the ability of tumor cells to extravasate we utilized whole organ confocal microscopy to identify individual tumor cells relative to the vasculature. MTT, migration and invasion assays were performed to evaluate the role of tumor derived MMP13 on hallmarks of cancer in vitro.
RESULTS - We found that MMP13 was significantly upregulated in the steatotic liver both in mice as well as human patients with NAFLD. We showed a decrease in metastatic tumor burden in Mmp13-/- mice compared to wildtype mice, explained in part by a reduction in the number of tumor cells extravasating from the hepatic vasculature in the Mmp13-/- mice compared to wildtype mice. Additionally, loss of tumor derived MMP13 through stable knockdown in tumor cell lines lead to decreased migratory and invasive properties in vitro and metastatic burden in vivo.
CONCLUSIONS - This study demonstrates that stromal as well as tumor derived MMP13 contribute to tumor cell extravasation and establishment of metastases in the liver microenvironment.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Stromal matrix metalloproteinase 2 regulates collagen expression and promotes the outgrowth of experimental metastases.
Bates AL, Pickup MW, Hallett MA, Dozier EA, Thomas S, Fingleton B
(2015) J Pathol 235: 773-83
MeSH Terms: Actins, Animals, Cell Proliferation, Coculture Techniques, Collagen, Female, Fibroblasts, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Matrix Metalloproteinase 2, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Spheroids, Cellular, Stromal Cells, Time Factors, Transfection, Transforming Growth Factor beta1, Vimentin
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Breast cancer survival rates decrease from 99% for patients with local disease to 25% for those with distant metastases. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP2, are associated with metastatic progression. We found that loss of host MMP2 reduces the proliferation of experimental metastases in the lungs and identified fibroblasts in tumour-bearing lungs as the major source of MMP2. In vitro, spheroidal mammary tumour growth was increased by co-culture with control fibroblasts isolated from tumour-bearing lungs, but not when fibroblasts with stable Mmp2 knockdown were used. This result prompted us to assess whether MMP2 was responsible for a tumour-proliferative, activated fibroblast phenotype. To test this, we evaluated: (a) fibroblasts from wild-type tumour-bearing lungs, with or without shRNA-mediated MMP2 knockdown; and (b) normal, quiescent fibroblasts isolated from either WT or Mmp2(-/-) mice. Quantitative PCR revealed that Mmp2 knockdown attenuated expression of two markers of activation (α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin), but there was minimal expression in quiescent WT or Mmp2(-/-) fibroblasts, as expected. Placing quiescent fibroblasts under activating conditions led to increases in activation-associated transcripts in WT but not Mmp2(-/-) fibroblasts. Additionally, Mmp2 knockdown fibroblasts showed significantly decreased expression of the matrix transcripts collagen I, collagen IV and fibronectin. Addition of active TGFβ was sufficient to rescue the MMP2-dependent collagen I and IV expression, while MMP2-induced collagen expression was blocked by the addition of TGFβ1-neutralizing antibody. Gene expression data in stromal cells of human breast cancers reveal that MMP2 expression is also positively correlated with activation and matrix transcripts. Thus, we present a model whereby MMP2 production in tumour fibroblasts is important for TGFβ1 activity and subsequent activation of fibroblasts to a matrix-producing, proliferation-supportive phenotype. Overall, our results reveal a previously undefined role for MMP2 in metastatic outgrowth mediated by fibroblasts, and extend the mechanisms by which MMPs contribute to tumour progression.
Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms