Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 74

Publication Record

Connections

Antibody Responses to Subspecies Proteins in a Large Prospective Colorectal Cancer Cohort Consortium.
Butt J, Blot WJ, Teras LR, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman CA, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GY, Tinker LF, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2018) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 27: 1186-1194
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibody Formation, Bacterial Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2018
Antibody responses to subspecies (SGG) proteins, especially pilus protein Gallo2178, have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Previous case-control studies and prospective studies with up to 8 years of follow-up, however, were unable to decipher the temporality of antibody responses to SGG in the context of the long-term multistep development of colorectal cancer. In this study, we analyzed a large U.S. colorectal cancer cohort consortium with follow-up beyond 10 years for antibody responses to SGG. We applied multiplex serology to measure antibody responses to 9 SGG proteins in participants of 10 prospective U.S. cohorts (CLUE, CPSII, HPFS, MEC, NHS, NYUWHS, PHS, PLCO, SCCS, and WHI) including 4,063 incident colorectal cancer cases and 4,063 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess whether antibody responses to SGG were associated with colorectal cancer risk, overall and by time between blood draw and diagnosis. Colorectal cancer risk was increased among those with antibody responses to Gallo2178, albeit not statistically significant [OR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-1.52]. This association was stronger for cases diagnosed <10 years after blood draw (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.09-1.79), but was not found among cases diagnosed ≥10 years after blood draw (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.50-1.24). In a large cohort consortium, we reproduced the association of antibody responses to SGG Gallo2178 with colorectal cancer risk for individuals diagnosed within 10 years after blood draw. This timing-specific finding suggests that antibody responses to SGG are associated with increased colorectal cancer risk only after tumorigenesis has begun. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Efferocytosis-induced prostaglandin E2 production impairs alveolar macrophage effector functions during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.
Salina AC, Souza TP, Serezani CH, Medeiros AI
(2017) Innate Immun 23: 219-227
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Bacteriolysis, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Dinoprostone, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Jurkat Cells, Macrophages, Alveolar, Phagocytosis, Pneumococcal Infections, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are multitasking cells that maintain lung homeostasis by clearing apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and performing antimicrobial effector functions. Different PRRs have been described to be involved in the binding and capture of non-opsonized Streptococcus pneumoniae, such as TLR-2, mannose receptor (MR) and scavenger receptors (SRs). However, the mechanism by which the ingestion of apoptotic cells negatively influences the clearance of non-opsonized S. pneumoniae remains to be determined. In this study, we evaluated whether the prostaglandin E2 (PGE) produced during efferocytosis by AMs inhibits the ingestion and killing of non-opsonized S. pneumoniae. Resident AMs were pre-treated with an E prostanoid (EP) receptor antagonist, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and protein kinase A (PKA), incubated with apoptotic Jurkat T cells, and then challenged with S. pneumoniae. Efferocytosis slightly decreased the phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae but greatly inhibited bacterial killing by AMs in a manner dependent on PGE production, activation of the EP2-EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway and inhibition of HO production. Our data suggest that the PGE produced by AMs during efferocytosis inhibits HO production and impairs the efficient clearance non-opsonized S. pneumoniae by EP2-EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Group B Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity.
Kothary V, Doster RS, Rogers LM, Kirk LA, Boyd KL, Romano-Keeler J, Haley KP, Manning SD, Aronoff DM, Gaddy JA
(2017) Front Cell Infect Microbiol 7: 19
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Disease Models, Animal, Extracellular Traps, Female, Immunity, Innate, Iron, Lactoferrin, Mice, Microbial Viability, Mucous Membrane, Neutrophil Infiltration, Reproductive Tract Infections, Streptococcus agalactiae
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
, or Group B (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships and . The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Differing mechanisms of surviving phagosomal stress among group B Streptococcus strains of varying genotypes.
Korir ML, Laut C, Rogers LM, Plemmons JA, Aronoff DM, Manning SD
(2017) Virulence 8: 924-937
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Genotype, Humans, Macrophages, Phagocytosis, Phagosomes, Serogroup, Serotyping, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus agalactiae, Stress, Physiological, THP-1 Cells, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, asymptomatically colonizes up to 30% of women and can persistently colonize even after antibiotic treatment. Previous studies have shown that GBS resides inside macrophages, but the mechanism by which it survives remains unknown. Here, we examined the ability of 4 GBS strains to survive inside macrophages and then focused on 2 strains belonging to sequence type (ST)-17 and ST-12, to examine persistence in the presence of antibiotics. A multiple stress medium was also developed using several stressors found in the phagosome to assess the ability of 30 GBS strains to withstand phagosomal stress. The ST-17 strain was more readily phagocytosed and survived intracellularly longer than the ST-12 strain, but the ST-12 strain was tolerant to ampicillin unlike the ST-17 strain. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and erythromycin increased the level of phagocytosis of the ST-17 strain, but had no effect on the ST-12 strain. In addition, blocking acidification of the phagosome decreased the survival of the ST-17 strain indicating a pH-dependent survival mechanism for the ST-17 strain. Congruent with the macrophage experiments, the ST-17 strain had a higher survival rate in the multiple stress medium than the ST-12 strain, and overall, serotype III isolates survived significantly better than other serotypes. These results indicate that diverse GBS strains may use differing mechanisms to persist and that serotype III strains are better able to survive specific stressors inside the phagosome relative to other serotypes.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Density and Evolution of Acute Respiratory Illnesses in Young Children, Peru, 2009-2011.
Fan RR, Howard LM, Griffin MR, Edwards KM, Zhu Y, Williams JV, Vidal JE, Klugman KP, Gil AI, Lanata CF, Grijalva CG
(2016) Emerg Infect Dis 22: 1996-1999
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Bacterial Load, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Nasopharynx, Peru, Pneumococcal Infections, Pneumococcal Vaccines, Population Surveillance, Respiratory Tract Infections, Risk Factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
We examined nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization density patterns surrounding acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) in young children in Peru. Pneumococcal densities were dynamic, gradually increasing leading up to an ARI, peaking during the ARI, and decreasing after the ARI. Rhinovirus co-infection was associated with higher pneumococcal densities.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Association between genotypic diversity and biofilm production in group B Streptococcus.
Parker RE, Laut C, Gaddy JA, Zadoks RN, Davies HD, Manning SD
(2016) BMC Microbiol 16: 86
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Biofilms, Cattle, Fimbriae, Bacterial, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Humans, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Phylogeny, Streptococcus agalactiae, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
BACKGROUND - Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis and an important factor in premature and stillbirths. Biofilm production has been suggested to be important for GBS pathogenesis alongside many other elements, including phylogenetic lineage and virulence factors, such as pili and capsule type. A complete understanding of the confluence of these components, however, is lacking. To identify associations between biofilm phenotype, pilus profile and lineage, 293 strains from asymptomatic carriers, invasive disease cases, and bovine mastitis cases, were assessed for biofilm production using an in vitro assay.
RESULTS - Multilocus sequence type (ST) profile, pilus island profile, and isolate source were associated with biofilm production. Strains from invasive disease cases and/or belonging to the ST-17 and ST-19 lineages were significantly more likely to form weak biofilms, whereas strains producing strong biofilms were recovered more frequently from individuals with asymptomatic colonization.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that biofilm production is a lineage-specific trait in GBS and may promote colonization of strains representing lineages other than STs 17 and 19. The findings herein also demonstrate that biofilms must be considered in the treatment of pregnant women, particularly for women with heavy GBS colonization.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Increased lethality and defective pulmonary clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1-knockout mice.
Dolan JM, Weinberg JB, O'Brien E, Abashian A, Procario MC, Aronoff DM, Crofford LJ, Peters-Golden M, Ward L, Mancuso P
(2016) Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 310: L1111-20
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cytokines, Dinoprostone, Female, Immunity, Innate, Lung, Macrophages, Alveolar, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microsomes, Nitric Oxide, Pneumonia, Pneumococcal, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
The production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases dramatically during pneumococcal pneumonia, and this lipid mediator impairs alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated innate immune responses. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of PGE2, and its expression is enhanced during bacterial infections. Genetic deletion of mPGES-1 in mice results in diminished PGE2 production and elevated levels of other prostaglandins after infection. Since PGE2 plays an important immunoregulatory role during bacterial pneumonia we assessed the impact of mPGES-1 deletion in the host defense against pneumococcal pneumonia in vivo and in AMs in vitro. Wild-type (WT) and mPGES-1 knockout (KO) mice were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae via the intratracheal route. Compared with WT animals, we observed reduced survival and increased lung and spleen bacterial burdens in mPGES-1 KO mice 24 and 48 h after S. pneumoniae infection. While we found modest differences between WT and mPGES-1 KO mice in pulmonary cytokines, AMs from mPGES-1 KO mice exhibited defective killing of ingested bacteria in vitro that was associated with diminished inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Treatment of AMs from mPGES-1 KO mice with an NO donor restored bacterial killing in vitro. These results suggest that mPGES-1 plays a critical role in bacterial pneumonia and that genetic ablation of this enzyme results in diminished pulmonary host defense in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that specific inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by targeting mPGES-1 may weaken host defense against bacterial infections.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Novel aspects of sialoglycan recognition by the Siglec-like domains of streptococcal SRR glycoproteins.
Bensing BA, Khedri Z, Deng L, Yu H, Prakobphol A, Fisher SJ, Chen X, Iverson TM, Varki A, Sullam PM
(2016) Glycobiology 26: 1222-1234
MeSH Terms: Glycoproteins, Humans, Ligands, Polysaccharides, Sialic Acid Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectins, Sialic Acids, Streptococcus
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins are adhesins expressed by commensal and pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria. A subset of these adhesins, expressed by oral streptococci, binds sialylated glycans decorating human salivary mucin MG2/MUC7, and platelet glycoprotein GPIb. Specific sialoglycan targets were previously identified for the ligand-binding regions (BRs) of GspB and Hsa, two serine-rich repeat glycoproteins expressed by Streptococcus gordonii While GspB selectively binds sialyl-T antigen, Hsa displays broader specificity. Here we examine the binding properties of four additional BRs from Streptococcus sanguinis or Streptococcus mitis and characterize the molecular determinants of ligand selectivity and affinity. Each BR has two domains that are essential for sialoglycan binding by GspB. One domain is structurally similar to the glycan-binding module of mammalian Siglecs (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins), including an arginine residue that is critical for glycan recognition, and that resides within a novel, conserved YTRY motif. Despite low sequence similarity to GspB, one of the BRs selectively binds sialyl-T antigen. Although the other three BRs are highly similar to Hsa, each displayed a unique ligand repertoire, including differential recognition of sialyl Lewis antigens and sulfated glycans. These differences in glycan selectivity were closely associated with differential binding to salivary and platelet glycoproteins. Specificity of sialoglycan adherence is likely an evolving trait that may influence the propensity of streptococci expressing Siglec-like adhesins to cause infective endocarditis.
Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Bacterial Density, Serotype Distribution and Antibiotic Resistance of Pneumococcal Strains from the Nasopharynx of Peruvian Children Before and After Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7.
Hanke CR, Grijalva CG, Chochua S, Pletz MW, Hornberg C, Edwards KM, Griffin MR, Verastegui H, Gil AI, Lanata CF, Klugman KP, Vidal JE
(2016) Pediatr Infect Dis J 35: 432-9
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Load, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine, Humans, Infant, Male, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Nasopharynx, Peru, Pneumococcal Infections, Prevalence, Serogroup, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) have decreased nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine types but little data exist from rural areas. We investigated bacterial density, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance of pneumococcal strains within the nasopharynx of young children in the Peruvian Andes, 2 years after PCV7 was introduced.
METHODS - Pneumococcal strains were isolated from a subset of 125 children from our Peruvian cohort, who entered the study in 2009 and had pneumococcus detected in the nasopharynx in both 2009 and during follow-up in 2011. Strains were Quellung serotyped and tested for susceptibility to antibiotics. Bacterial density was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.
RESULTS - The prevalence of PCV7 strains decreased from 48% in 2009 to 28.8% in 2011, whereas non-PCV7 types increased from 52% to 71.2% (P = 0.002). There was a 3.5-fold increase in carriage of serotype 6C in 2011 (P = 0.026). Vaccination with PCV7 did not affect pneumococcal density in children colonized by a PCV7 type but did increase density in those colonized with a non-PCV7 type. Antibiotic resistance did not change after vaccine introduction; strains were nonsusceptible to tetracycline (97.2%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56.4%), penicillin (34%), erythromycin (22.4%), chloramphenicol (18.8%) and clindamycin (12.4%).
CONCLUSIONS - Serotype replacement was observed post-PCV7 vaccination with a concomitant, not previously recognized, increased nasopharyngeal density.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.
Bensing BA, Loukachevitch LV, McCulloch KM, Yu H, Vann KR, Wawrzak Z, Anderson S, Chen X, Sullam PM, Iverson TM
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 7230-40
MeSH Terms: Adhesins, Bacterial, Binding Sites, Blood Platelets, Endocarditis, Humans, N-Acetylneuraminic Acid, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms