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Epiglottitis.
Chapurin N, Gelbard A
(2019) N Engl J Med 381: e15
MeSH Terms: Deglutition Disorders, Epiglottitis, Fever, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neck, Radiography, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus pyogenes, Tracheostomy
Added July 30, 2020
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MeSH Terms
Antibody Responses to Subspecies Proteins in a Large Prospective Colorectal Cancer Cohort Consortium.
Butt J, Blot WJ, Teras LR, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman CA, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GY, Tinker LF, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2018) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 27: 1186-1194
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibody Formation, Bacterial Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2018
Antibody responses to subspecies (SGG) proteins, especially pilus protein Gallo2178, have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Previous case-control studies and prospective studies with up to 8 years of follow-up, however, were unable to decipher the temporality of antibody responses to SGG in the context of the long-term multistep development of colorectal cancer. In this study, we analyzed a large U.S. colorectal cancer cohort consortium with follow-up beyond 10 years for antibody responses to SGG. We applied multiplex serology to measure antibody responses to 9 SGG proteins in participants of 10 prospective U.S. cohorts (CLUE, CPSII, HPFS, MEC, NHS, NYUWHS, PHS, PLCO, SCCS, and WHI) including 4,063 incident colorectal cancer cases and 4,063 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess whether antibody responses to SGG were associated with colorectal cancer risk, overall and by time between blood draw and diagnosis. Colorectal cancer risk was increased among those with antibody responses to Gallo2178, albeit not statistically significant [OR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-1.52]. This association was stronger for cases diagnosed <10 years after blood draw (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.09-1.79), but was not found among cases diagnosed ≥10 years after blood draw (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.50-1.24). In a large cohort consortium, we reproduced the association of antibody responses to SGG Gallo2178 with colorectal cancer risk for individuals diagnosed within 10 years after blood draw. This timing-specific finding suggests that antibody responses to SGG are associated with increased colorectal cancer risk only after tumorigenesis has begun. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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19 MeSH Terms
An Unusual Source of Sepsis in Two Previously Healthy Children.
Frazier SB, Katz S, Wood JB, Cassat JE
(2018) Clin Pediatr (Phila) 57: 1120-1122
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacteremia, Child, Combined Modality Therapy, Disease Progression, Emergency Service, Hospital, Fluid Therapy, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Male, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Pyelonephritis, Risk Assessment, Sampling Studies, Severity of Illness Index, Streptococcal Infections, Treatment Outcome
Added April 3, 2018
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18 MeSH Terms
Erythematous plaques and papules on a premature infant.
Riemenschneider K, Redenius R, Reese J, Fine JD, Weitkamp JH, Tkaczyk E
(2017) J Am Acad Dermatol 76: e111-e112
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apgar Score, Biopsy, Needle, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gestational Age, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Impetigo, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn, Streptococcal Infections, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
A 2240 gram boy was born at 33.2 weeks gestation with nonblanching, deeply erythematous plaques and papules on the back, flanks, and scalp (Figure 1). His mother was GBS positive and on antibiotic suppression for prior cutaneous MRSA and urinary tract infections. Intrapartum intravenous Penicillin G was administered, and the amniotic sac was artificially ruptured 4 hours prior to delivery to facilitate labor. The delivery was uncomplicated without concern for chorioamnionitis, but the patient initially required CPAP for respiratory distress with 1-minute and 5-minute Apgar scores of 7 and 8, respectively. A skin punch biopsy is shown (Figure 2).
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Differing mechanisms of surviving phagosomal stress among group B Streptococcus strains of varying genotypes.
Korir ML, Laut C, Rogers LM, Plemmons JA, Aronoff DM, Manning SD
(2017) Virulence 8: 924-937
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Genotype, Humans, Macrophages, Phagocytosis, Phagosomes, Serogroup, Serotyping, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus agalactiae, Stress, Physiological, THP-1 Cells, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, asymptomatically colonizes up to 30% of women and can persistently colonize even after antibiotic treatment. Previous studies have shown that GBS resides inside macrophages, but the mechanism by which it survives remains unknown. Here, we examined the ability of 4 GBS strains to survive inside macrophages and then focused on 2 strains belonging to sequence type (ST)-17 and ST-12, to examine persistence in the presence of antibiotics. A multiple stress medium was also developed using several stressors found in the phagosome to assess the ability of 30 GBS strains to withstand phagosomal stress. The ST-17 strain was more readily phagocytosed and survived intracellularly longer than the ST-12 strain, but the ST-12 strain was tolerant to ampicillin unlike the ST-17 strain. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and erythromycin increased the level of phagocytosis of the ST-17 strain, but had no effect on the ST-12 strain. In addition, blocking acidification of the phagosome decreased the survival of the ST-17 strain indicating a pH-dependent survival mechanism for the ST-17 strain. Congruent with the macrophage experiments, the ST-17 strain had a higher survival rate in the multiple stress medium than the ST-12 strain, and overall, serotype III isolates survived significantly better than other serotypes. These results indicate that diverse GBS strains may use differing mechanisms to persist and that serotype III strains are better able to survive specific stressors inside the phagosome relative to other serotypes.
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14 MeSH Terms
Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.
Bensing BA, Loukachevitch LV, McCulloch KM, Yu H, Vann KR, Wawrzak Z, Anderson S, Chen X, Sullam PM, Iverson TM
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 7230-40
MeSH Terms: Adhesins, Bacterial, Binding Sites, Blood Platelets, Endocarditis, Humans, N-Acetylneuraminic Acid, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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Rapid binding of plasminogen to streptokinase in a catalytic complex reveals a three-step mechanism.
Verhamme IM, Bock PE
(2014) J Biol Chem 289: 28006-18
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Motifs, Bacterial Proteins, Binding Sites, Biocatalysis, Fibrinolysin, Humans, Kinetics, Plasminogen, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus, Streptokinase, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Rapid kinetics demonstrate a three-step pathway of streptokinase (SK) binding to plasminogen (Pg), the zymogen of plasmin (Pm). Formation of a fluorescently silent encounter complex is followed by two conformational tightening steps reported by fluorescence quenches. Forward reactions were defined by time courses of biphasic quenching during complex formation between SK or its COOH-terminal Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKΔK414) and active site-labeled [Lys]Pg ([5-(acetamido)fluorescein]-D-Phe-Phe-Arg-[Lys]Pg ([5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg)) and by the SK dependences of the quench rates. Active site-blocked Pm rapidly displaced [5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg from the complex. The encounter and final SK ·[5F]FFR-[Lys]Pg complexes were weakened similarly by SK Lys(414) deletion and blocking of lysine-binding sites (LBSs) on Pg kringles with 6-aminohexanoic acid or benzamidine. Forward and reverse rates for both tightening steps were unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid, whereas benzamidine released constraints on the first conformational tightening. This indicated that binding of SK Lys(414) to Pg kringle 4 plays a role in recognition of Pg by SK. The substantially lower affinity of the final SK · Pg complex compared with SK · Pm is characterized by a ∼ 25-fold weaker encounter complex and ∼ 40-fold faster off-rates for the second conformational step. The results suggest that effective Pg encounter requires SK Lys(414) engagement and significant non-LBS interactions with the protease domain, whereas Pm binding additionally requires contributions of other lysines. This difference may be responsible for the lower affinity of the SK · Pg complex and the expression of a weaker "pro"-exosite for binding of a second Pg in the substrate mode compared with SK · Pm.
© 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Intrauterine group A streptococcal infections are exacerbated by prostaglandin E2.
Mason KL, Rogers LM, Soares EM, Bani-Hashemi T, Erb Downward J, Agnew D, Peters-Golden M, Weinberg JB, Crofford LJ, Aronoff DM
(2013) J Immunol 191: 2457-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Pregnancy, Puerperal Infection, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus pyogenes, Uterus
Show Abstract · Added September 18, 2013
Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a major cause of severe postpartum sepsis, a re-emerging cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunological alterations occur during pregnancy to promote maternofetal tolerance, which may increase the risk for puerperal infection. PGE2 is an immunomodulatory lipid that regulates maternofetal tolerance, parturition, and innate immunity. The extent to which PGE2 regulates host immune responses to GAS infections in the context of endometritis is unknown. To address this, both an in vivo mouse intrauterine (i.u.) GAS infection model and an in vitro human macrophage-GAS interaction model were used. In C57BL/6 mice, i.u. GAS inoculation resulted in local and systemic inflammatory responses and triggered extensive changes in the expression of eicosanoid pathway genes. The i.u. administration of PGE2 increased the mortality of infected mice, suppressed local IL-6 and IL-17A levels, enhanced neutrophilic inflammation, reduced uterine macrophage populations, and increased bacterial dissemination. A role for endogenous PGE2 in the modulation of antistreptococcal host defense was suggested, because mice lacking the genes encoding the microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 or the EP2 receptor were protected from death, as were mice treated with the EP4 receptor antagonist, GW627368X. PGE2 also regulated GAS-macrophage interactions. In GAS-infected human THP-1 (macrophage-like) cells, PGE2 inhibited the production of MCP-1 and TNF-α while augmenting IL-10 expression. PGE2 also impaired the phagocytic ability of human placental macrophages, THP-1 cells, and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Exploring the targeted disruption of PGE2 synthesis and signaling to optimize existing antimicrobial therapies against GAS may be warranted.
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15 MeSH Terms
Leukotriene B4 enhances innate immune defense against the puerperal sepsis agent Streptococcus pyogenes.
Soares EM, Mason KL, Rogers LM, Serezani CH, Faccioli LH, Aronoff DM
(2013) J Immunol 190: 1614-22
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Animals, Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase, Cells, Cultured, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Leukotriene B4, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Puerperal Infection, Sepsis, Streptococcal Infections, Up-Regulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Puerperal sepsis is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Streptococcus pyogenes [group A Streptococcus; (GAS)] is a major etiologic agent of severe postpartum sepsis, yet little is known regarding the pathogenesis of these infections. Tissue macrophages provide innate defense against GAS, and their actions are highly regulated. The intracellular second messenger cAMP can negatively regulate macrophage actions against GAS. Because leukotriene (LT) B(4) has been shown to suppress intracellular cAMP in macrophages, we hypothesized that it could enhance innate defenses against GAS. We assessed the capacity of LTB(4) to modulate antistreptococcal actions of human macrophages, including placental and decidual macrophages and used a novel intrauterine infection model of GAS in mice lacking the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme to determine the role of endogenous LTs in host defense against this pathogen. Animals lacking 5-lipoxygenase were significantly more vulnerable to intrauterine GAS infection than were wild-type mice and showed enhanced dissemination of bacteria out of the uterus and a more robust inflammatory response than did wild-type mice. In addition, LTB(4) reduced intracellular cAMP levels via the BLT1 receptor and was a potent stimulant of macrophage phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase-dependent intracellular killing of GAS. Importantly, interference was observed between the macrophage immunomodulatory actions of LTB(4) and the cAMP-inducing lipid PGE(2), suggesting that interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory compounds may be important in vivo. This work underscores the potential for pharmacological targeting of lipid mediator signaling cascades in the treatment of invasive GAS infections.
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18 MeSH Terms
The spectrum of group A streptococcal joint pathology in the acute care setting.
Mignemi ME, Martus JE, Bracikowski AC, Lovejoy SA, Mencio GA, Schoenecker JG
(2012) Pediatr Emerg Care 28: 1185-9
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Arthritis, Infectious, Child, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Humans, Male, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus pyogenes, Synovitis
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a frequent cause of pediatric musculoskeletal infections including septic arthritis, acute rheumatic fever (ARF), and a more benign arthritis called post-streptococcal reactive arthritis. Children with painful joints are frequently evaluated in the acute care setting, and because the presentation of each of these entities is similar, the diagnosis can be difficult to make. Five cases of children with GAS arthridities are presented to demonstrate the spectrum of GAS-associated joint pathologies encountered in the acute care setting and also to discuss how GAS laboratory tests may assist in the evaluation and management of children presenting with a painful joint.
METHODS - Five cases of GAS-associated joint pathology are presented. Evaluation of these patients was conducted using a diagnostic algorithm derived from a literature review of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis and ARF, as well as the current clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis.
RESULTS - The 5 cases presented include 1 case of transient synovitis, 2 cases of inflammatory synovitis, 1 case of septic arthritis, and 1 case of ARF.
CONCLUSIONS - Determining the cause of joint pain in the acute care setting is challenging. The addition of the GAS laboratory tests to a diagnostic algorithm based on clinical examination and monitoring systemic inflammation can help to identify patients with ARF and septic arthritis in the acute care setting. In addition, GAS-specific laboratory tests may help to identify cases of nonseptic, non-ARF GAS joint pathology.
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10 MeSH Terms