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MyD88 and IL-1R signaling drive antibacterial immunity and osteoclast-driven bone loss during Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis.
Putnam NE, Fulbright LE, Curry JM, Ford CA, Petronglo JR, Hendrix AS, Cassat JE
(2019) PLoS Pathog 15: e1007744
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Resorption, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Female, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Osteoclasts, Osteomyelitis, Receptors, Interleukin-1 Type I, Signal Transduction, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Staphylococcus aureus is able to infect virtually all organ systems and is a frequently isolated etiologic agent of osteomyelitis, a common and debilitating invasive infection of bone. Treatment of osteomyelitis requires invasive surgical procedures and prolonged antibiotic therapy, yet is frequently unsuccessful due to extensive pathogen-induced bone damage that can limit antibiotic penetration and immune cell influx to the infectious focus. We previously established that S. aureus triggers profound alterations in bone remodeling in a murine model of osteomyelitis, in part through the production of osteolytic toxins. However, staphylococcal strains lacking osteolytic toxins still incite significant bone destruction, suggesting that host immune responses are also major drivers of pathologic bone remodeling during osteomyelitis. The objective of this study was to identify host immune pathways that contribute to antibacterial immunity during S. aureus osteomyelitis, and to define how these immune responses alter bone homeostasis and contribute to bone destruction. We specifically focused on the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and downstream adapter protein MyD88 given the prominent role of this signaling pathway in both antibacterial immunity and osteo-immunologic crosstalk. We discovered that while IL-1R signaling is necessary for local control of bacterial replication during osteomyelitis, it also contributes to bone loss during infection. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that S. aureus enhances osteoclastogenesis of myeloid precursors in vitro, and increases the abundance of osteoclasts residing on bone surfaces in vivo. This enhanced osteoclast abundance translates to trabecular bone loss, and is dependent on intact IL-1R signaling. Collectively, these data define IL-1R signaling as a critical component of the host response to S. aureus osteomyelitis, but also demonstrate that IL-1R-dependent immune responses trigger collateral bone damage through activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.
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16 MeSH Terms
Manganese Detoxification by MntE Is Critical for Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence of .
Grunenwald CM, Choby JE, Juttukonda LJ, Beavers WN, Weiss A, Torres VJ, Skaar EP
(2019) MBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Homeostasis, Iron, Manganese, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Viability, Oxidative Stress, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient critical for the pathogenesis of , a significant cause of human morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, excess Mn is toxic; therefore, maintenance of intracellular Mn homeostasis is required for survival. Here we describe a Mn exporter in , MntE, which is a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family and conserved among Gram-positive pathogens. Upregulation of transcription in response to excess Mn is dependent on the presence of MntR, a transcriptional repressor of the Mn uptake system. Inactivation of or leads to reduced growth in media supplemented with Mn, demonstrating MntE is required for detoxification of excess Mn. Inactivation of results in elevated levels of intracellular Mn, but reduced intracellular iron (Fe) levels, supporting the hypothesis that MntE functions as a Mn efflux pump and Mn efflux influences Fe homeostasis. Strains inactivated for are more sensitive to the oxidants NaOCl and paraquat, indicating Mn homeostasis is critical for resisting oxidative stress. Furthermore, and are required for full virulence of during infection, suggesting experiences Mn toxicity Combined, these data support a model in which MntR controls Mn homeostasis by balancing transcriptional repression of and induction of , both of which are critical for pathogenesis. Thus, Mn efflux contributes to bacterial survival and virulence during infection, establishing MntE as a potential antimicrobial target and expanding our understanding of Mn homeostasis. Manganese (Mn) is generally viewed as a critical nutrient that is beneficial to pathogenic bacteria due to its function as an enzymatic cofactor and its capability of acting as an antioxidant; yet paradoxically, high concentrations of this transition metal can be toxic. In this work, we demonstrate utilizes the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family protein MntE to alleviate Mn toxicity through efflux of excess Mn. Inactivation of leads to a significant reduction in resistance to oxidative stress and mediated mortality within a mouse model of systemic infection. These results highlight the importance of MntE-mediated Mn detoxification in intracellular Mn homeostasis, resistance to oxidative stress, and virulence. Therefore, this establishes MntE as a potential target for development of anti- therapeutics.
Copyright © 2019 Grunenwald et al.
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15 MeSH Terms
Nonconventional Therapeutics against .
Grunenwald CM, Bennett MR, Skaar EP
(2018) Microbiol Spectr 6:
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacteriophages, Biofilms, Drug Discovery, Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial, Humans, Phage Therapy, Photochemotherapy, Quorum Sensing, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Virulence, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
is one of the most important human pathogens that is responsible for a variety of diseases ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to endocarditis and sepsis. In recent decades, the treatment of staphylococcal infections has become increasingly difficult as the prevalence of multi-drug resistant strains continues to rise. With increasing mortality rates and medical costs associated with drug resistant strains, there is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic options. Many innovative strategies for alternative drug development are being pursued, including disruption of biofilms, inhibition of virulence factor production, bacteriophage-derived antimicrobials, anti-staphylococcal vaccines, and light-based therapies. While many compounds and methods still need further study to determine their feasibility, some are quickly approaching clinical application and may be available in the near future.
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MeSH Terms
Molecular Basis for the Evolution of Species-Specific Hemoglobin Capture by Staphylococcus aureus.
Choby JE, Buechi HB, Farrand AJ, Skaar EP, Barber MF
(2018) MBio 9:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Evolution, Molecular, Hemoglobins, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Iron, Mutation, Primates, Protein Binding, Species Specificity, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
Metals are a limiting resource for pathogenic bacteria and must be scavenged from host proteins. Hemoglobin provides the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is required by several pathogens to cause invasive disease. However, the consequences of hemoglobin evolution for bacterial nutrient acquisition remain unclear. Here we show that the α- and β-globin genes exhibit strikingly parallel signatures of adaptive evolution across simian primates. Rapidly evolving sites in hemoglobin correspond to binding interfaces of IsdB, a bacterial hemoglobin receptor harbored by pathogenic Using an evolution-guided experimental approach, we demonstrate that the divergence between primates and staphylococcal isolates governs hemoglobin recognition and bacterial growth. The reintroduction of putative adaptive mutations in α- or β-globin proteins was sufficient to impair binding, providing a mechanism for the evolution of disease resistance. These findings suggest that bacterial hemoprotein capture has driven repeated evolutionary conflicts with hemoglobin during primate descent. During infection, bacteria must steal metals, including iron, from the host tissue. Therefore, pathogenic bacteria have evolved metal acquisition systems to overcome the elaborate processes mammals use to withhold metal from pathogens. uses IsdB, a hemoglobin receptor, to thieve iron-containing heme from hemoglobin within human blood. We find evidence that primate hemoglobin has undergone rapid evolution at protein surfaces contacted by IsdB. Additionally, variation in the hemoglobin sequences among primates, or variation in IsdB of related staphylococci, reduces bacterial hemoglobin capture. Together, these data suggest that has evolved to recognize human hemoglobin in the face of rapid evolution at the IsdB binding interface, consistent with repeated evolutionary conflicts in the battle for iron during host-pathogen interactions.
Copyright © 2018 Choby et al.
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11 MeSH Terms
The TLR4 Agonist Monophosphoryl Lipid A Drives Broad Resistance to Infection via Dynamic Reprogramming of Macrophage Metabolism.
Fensterheim BA, Young JD, Luan L, Kleinbard RR, Stothers CL, Patil NK, McAtee-Pereira AG, Guo Y, Trenary I, Hernandez A, Fults JB, Williams DL, Sherwood ER, Bohannon JK
(2018) J Immunol 200: 3777-3789
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Candida albicans, Candidiasis, Glycolysis, Lipid A, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Signal Transduction, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) is a clinically used TLR4 agonist that has been found to drive nonspecific resistance to infection for up to 2 wk. However, the molecular mechanisms conferring protection are not well understood. In this study, we found that MPLA prompts resistance to infection, in part, by inducing a sustained and dynamic metabolic program in macrophages that supports improved pathogen clearance. Mice treated with MPLA had enhanced resistance to infection with and that was associated with augmented microbial clearance and organ protection. Tissue macrophages, which exhibited augmented phagocytosis and respiratory burst after MPLA treatment, were required for the beneficial effects of MPLA. Further analysis of the macrophage phenotype revealed that early TLR4-driven aerobic glycolysis was later coupled with mitochondrial biogenesis, enhanced malate shuttling, and increased mitochondrial ATP production. This metabolic program was initiated by overlapping and redundant contributions of MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways as well as downstream mTOR activation. Blockade of mTOR signaling inhibited the development of the metabolic and functional macrophage phenotype and ablated MPLA-induced resistance to infection in vivo. Our findings reveal that MPLA drives macrophage metabolic reprogramming that evolves over a period of days to support a macrophage phenotype highly effective at mediating microbe clearance and that this results in nonspecific resistance to infection.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Integrated molecular imaging reveals tissue heterogeneity driving host-pathogen interactions.
Cassat JE, Moore JL, Wilson KJ, Stark Z, Prentice BM, Van de Plas R, Perry WJ, Zhang Y, Virostko J, Colvin DC, Rose KL, Judd AM, Reyzer ML, Spraggins JM, Grunenwald CM, Gore JC, Caprioli RM, Skaar EP
(2018) Sci Transl Med 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Molecular Imaging, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Diseases are characterized by distinct changes in tissue molecular distribution. Molecular analysis of intact tissues traditionally requires preexisting knowledge of, and reagents for, the targets of interest. Conversely, label-free discovery of disease-associated tissue analytes requires destructive processing for downstream identification platforms. Tissue-based analyses therefore sacrifice discovery to gain spatial distribution of known targets or sacrifice tissue architecture for discovery of unknown targets. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a multimodality imaging platform for discovery-based molecular histology. We apply this platform to a model of disseminated infection triggered by the pathogen , leading to the discovery of infection-associated alterations in the distribution and abundance of proteins and elements in tissue in mice. These data provide an unbiased, three-dimensional analysis of how disease affects the molecular architecture of complex tissues, enable culture-free diagnosis of infection through imaging-based detection of bacterial and host analytes, and reveal molecular heterogeneity at the host-pathogen interface.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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4 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
HemX Modulates Glutamyl-tRNA Reductase Abundance To Regulate Heme Biosynthesis.
Choby JE, Grunenwald CM, Celis AI, Gerdes SY, DuBois JL, Skaar EP
(2018) MBio 9:
MeSH Terms: Aldehyde Oxidoreductases, Bacterial Proteins, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Heme, Methyltransferases, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
is responsible for a significant amount of devastating disease. Its ability to colonize the host and cause infection is supported by a variety of proteins that are dependent on the cofactor heme. Heme is a porphyrin used broadly across kingdoms and is synthesized from common cellular precursors and iron. While heme is critical to bacterial physiology, it is also toxic in high concentrations, requiring that organisms encode regulatory processes to control heme homeostasis. In this work, we describe a posttranscriptional regulatory strategy in heme biosynthesis. The first committed enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GtrR), is regulated by heme abundance and the integral membrane protein HemX. GtrR abundance increases dramatically in response to heme deficiency, suggesting a mechanism by which responds to the need to increase heme synthesis. Additionally, HemX is required to maintain low levels of GtrR in heme-proficient cells, and inactivation of leads to increased heme synthesis. Excess heme synthesis in a Δ mutant activates the staphylococcal heme stress response, suggesting that regulation of heme synthesis is critical to reduce self-imposed heme toxicity. Analysis of diverse organisms indicates that HemX is widely conserved among heme-synthesizing bacteria, suggesting that HemX is a common factor involved in the regulation of GtrR abundance. Together, this work demonstrates that regulates heme synthesis by modulating GtrR abundance in response to heme deficiency and through the activity of the broadly conserved HemX. is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections, endocarditis, bacteremia, and osteomyelitis, making it a critical health care concern. Development of new antimicrobials against requires knowledge of the physiology that supports this organism's pathogenesis. One component of staphylococcal physiology that contributes to growth and virulence is heme. Heme is a widely utilized cofactor that enables diverse chemical reactions across many enzyme families. relies on many critical heme-dependent proteins and is sensitive to excess heme toxicity, suggesting must maintain proper intracellular heme homeostasis. Because provides heme for heme-dependent enzymes via synthesis from common precursors, we hypothesized that regulation of heme synthesis is one mechanism to maintain heme homeostasis. In this study, we identify that posttranscriptionally regulates heme synthesis by restraining abundance of the first heme biosynthetic enzyme, GtrR, via heme and the broadly conserved membrane protein HemX.
Copyright © 2018 Choby et al.
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8 MeSH Terms
Fur regulation of Staphylococcus aureus heme oxygenases is required for heme homeostasis.
Lojek LJ, Farrand AJ, Weiss A, Skaar EP
(2018) Int J Med Microbiol 308: 582-589
MeSH Terms: Aerobiosis, Bacterial Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Heme, Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing), Homeostasis, Iron, Mixed Function Oxygenases, Oxygenases, Repressor Proteins, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
Heme is a cofactor that is essential for cellular respiration and for the function of many enzymes. If heme levels become too low within the cell, S. aureus switches from producing energy via respiration to producing energy by fermentation. S. aureus encodes two heme oxygenases, IsdI and IsdG, which cleave the porphyrin heme ring releasing iron for use as a nutrient source. Both isdI and isdG are only expressed under low iron conditions and are regulated by the canonical Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur). Here we demonstrate that unregulated expression of isdI and isdG within S. aureus leads to reduced growth under low iron conditions. Additionally, the constitutive expression of these enzymes leads to decreased heme abundance in S. aureus, an increase in the fermentation product lactate, and increased resistance to gentamicin. This work demonstrates that S. aureus has developed tuning mechanisms, such as Fur regulation, to ensure that the cell has sufficient quantities of heme for efficient ATP production through aerobic respiration.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Poly(glycidol) Coating on Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene for Reduced Biofilm Growth.
Lockhart JN, Spoonmore TJ, McCurdy MW, Rogers BR, Guelcher SA, Harth E
(2018) ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 10: 4050-4056
MeSH Terms: Biofilms, Coated Materials, Biocompatible, Molecular Weight, Polyethylenes, Propylene Glycols, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
Semibranched poly(glycidol) (PG-OH) and poly(glycidol allylglycidyl ether) (PG-Allyl) coatings were formed on ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UMWPE) in a unique two-step process which included radiation of UHMWPE followed by grafting of PG-OH or PG-Allyl to the surface via free radical cross-linking. Resulting surfaces were extensively characterized by FTIR-ATR, XPS, fluorescent microscopy, and contact goniometry. The performance was evaluated using the most prominent biofilm-forming bacteria Staphylococcus aureus for 24 and 48 h. The PG-Allyl coating demonstrated a 3 log reduction in biofilm growth compared to noncoated control, demonstrating a promising potential to inhibit adherence and colonization of biofilm-forming bacteria that often develop into persistent infections.
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6 MeSH Terms
Crossed Wires: Interspecies Interference Blocks Pathogen Colonization.
Lopez CA, Skaar EP
(2017) Cell Host Microbe 22: 721-723
MeSH Terms: Humans, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Symbiosis, Virulence, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
Commensal bacteria protect against invading pathogens using many strategies. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Paharik et al. (2017) find that a commensal blocks Staphylococcus aureus colonization by producing a signal to shut down virulence.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms