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Distinct Immunomodulatory Effects of Spermine Oxidase in Colitis Induced by Epithelial Injury or Infection.
Gobert AP, Al-Greene NT, Singh K, Coburn LA, Sierra JC, Verriere TG, Luis PB, Schneider C, Asim M, Allaman MM, Barry DP, Cleveland JL, Destefano Shields CE, Casero RA, Washington MK, Piazuelo MB, Wilson KT
(2018) Front Immunol 9: 1242
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citrobacter rodentium, Colitis, Cytokines, Dextran Sulfate, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Deletion, Immunity, Mucosal, Immunomodulation, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors, Spermidine, Spermine
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2018
Polyamines have been implicated in numerous biological processes, including inflammation and carcinogenesis. Homeostatic regulation leads to interconversion of the polyamines putrescine and the downstream metabolites spermidine and spermine. The enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX), which back-converts spermine to spermidine, contributes to regulation of polyamine levels, but can also have other effects. We have implicated SMOX in gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis due to infection by the pathogen . In addition, we reported that SMOX can be upregulated in humans with inflammatory bowel disease. Herein, we utilized -deficient mice to examine the role of SMOX in two murine colitis models, infection and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced epithelial injury. In -infected wild-type (WT) mice, there were marked increases in colon weight/length and histologic injury, with mucosal hyperplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration; these changes were ameliorated in mice. In contrast, with DSS, mice exhibited substantial mortality, and increased body weight loss, colon weight/length, and histologic damage. In -infected WT mice, there were increased colonic levels of the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL2, and CXCL10, and the cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, CSF3, IFN-γ, and IL-17; each were downregulated in mice. In DSS colitis, increased levels of IL-6, CSF3, and IL-17 were further increased in mice. In both models, putrescine and spermidine were increased in WT mice; in mice, the main effect was decreased spermidine and spermidine/spermine ratio. With , polyamine levels correlated with histologic injury, while with DSS, spermidine was inversely correlated with injury. Our studies indicate that SMOX has immunomodulatory effects in experimental colitis polyamine flux. Thus, SMOX contributes to the immunopathogenesis of infection, but is protective in DSS colitis, indicating the divergent effects of spermidine.
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16 MeSH Terms
Phase 1 study of N(1),N(11)‑diethylnorspermine (DENSPM) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.
Goyal L, Supko JG, Berlin J, Blaszkowsky LS, Carpenter A, Heuman DM, Hilderbrand SL, Stuart KE, Cotler S, Senzer NN, Chan E, Berg CL, Clark JW, Hezel AF, Ryan DP, Zhu AX
(2013) Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 72: 1305-14
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Hepatocellular, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Karnofsky Performance Status, Liver Function Tests, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Maximum Tolerated Dose, Middle Aged, Severity of Illness Index, Spermine, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
PURPOSE - N(1),N(11)-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM), a synthetic analog of the naturally occurring polyamine spermine, can induce polyamine depletion and inhibit tumor cell growth. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the safety, maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of DENSPM in advanced HCC.
METHODS - Patients with measurable advanced HCC, Child-Pugh A or B cirrhosis, CLIP score ≤3, and Karnofsky score ≥60 % were eligible. DENSPM was given as a short intravenous infusion on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12 of each 28-day cycle. The starting dose of 30 mg/m(2) was escalated at a fixed increment of 15 mg/m(2) until the MTD was identified. The plasma pharmacokinetics of DENSPM for the first and last doses given in cycle 1 was characterized.
RESULTS - Thirty-eight patients (male 79 %; median age 61 years; Child-Pugh A 84 %; ≥1 prior systemic therapy 45 %) were enrolled and treated. The most common adverse events (AEs) ≥grade 1 were fatigue (53 %), nausea (34 %), diarrhea (32 %), vomiting (32 %), anemia (29 %), and elevated AST (29 %). The most common grade 3-4 AEs were fatigue/asthenia (13 %), elevated AST (13 %), hyperbilirubinemia (11 %), renal failure (8 %), and hyperglycemia (8 %). The MTD was 75 mg/m(2). There were no objective responses, although 7/38 (18 %) patients achieved stable disease for ≥16 weeks. The overall mean (±SD) total body clearance for the initial dose, 66.3 ± 35.9 L/h/m(2) (n = 16), was comparable to the clearance in patients with normal to near normal hepatic function. Drug levels in plasma decayed rapidly immediately after the infusion but remained above 10 nM for several days after dosing at the MTD.
CONCLUSIONS - N(1),N(11)-diethylnorspermine treatment at the MTD of 75 mg/m(2), given intravenously every other weekday for two consecutive weeks of each 28-day cycle, was relatively well tolerated in patients with advanced HCC including those with mild-to-moderate liver dysfunction. This administration schedule provided prolonged systemic exposure to potentially effective concentrations of the drug. Stable disease was seen in 18 % of patients receiving DENSPM treatment. Further evaluation of DENSPM monotherapy for advanced HCC does not appear to be justified because of insufficient evidence of clinical benefit in the patients evaluated in this study.
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17 MeSH Terms
Spermine oxidase, a polyamine catabolic enzyme that links Helicobacter pylori CagA and gastric cancer risk.
Chaturvedi R, de Sablet T, Peek RM, Wilson KT
(2012) Gut Microbes 3: 48-56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Bacterial, Apoptosis, Bacterial Proteins, DNA Damage, Epithelial Cells, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Mice, Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors, Spermine, Stomach Neoplasms, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
We have recently reported that Helicobacter pylori strains expressing the virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) stimulate increased levels of spermine oxidase (SMO) in gastric epithelial cells, while cagA⁻ strains did not. SMO catabolizes the polyamine spermine and produces H₂O₂ that results in both apoptosis and DNA damage. Exogenous overexpression of CagA confirmed these findings, and knockdown or inhibition of SMO blocked CagA-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage. The strong association of SMO, apoptosis, and DNA damage was also demonstrated in humans infected with cagA⁺, but not cagA⁻ strains. In infected gerbils and mice, DNA damage was CagA-dependent and only present in epithelial cells that expressed SMO. We also discovered SMO (high) gastric epithelial cells from infected animals with dysplasia that are resistant to apoptosis despite high levels of DNA damage. Inhibition of polyamine synthesis or SMO could abrogate the development of this cell population that may represent precursors for neoplastic transformation.
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16 MeSH Terms
The evolution of a superbug: how Staphylococcus aureus overcomes its unique susceptibility to polyamines.
Anzaldi LL, Skaar EP
(2011) Mol Microbiol 82: 1-3
MeSH Terms: Acetyltransferases, Bacterial Proteins, Spermidine, Spermine, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added February 11, 2016
Polyamines are ubiquitous compounds thought to be synthesized by and required for all life. The manuscript published in this issue by Joshi and colleagues upsets this dogma by identifying several bacterial species that do not make polyamines, and in some cases do not require polyamines for growth. One such species is the significant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, which is shown to be uniquely sensitive to polyamines. By unravelling the mechanisms of staphylococcal polyamine toxicity and tolerance, Joshi et al. (2011) provide insights into how the most virulent strains of S. aureus have evolved to be more fit during infection.
© 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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5 MeSH Terms
Interactions between the etoposide derivative F14512 and human type II topoisomerases: implications for the C4 spermine moiety in promoting enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage.
Gentry AC, Pitts SL, Jablonsky MJ, Bailly C, Graves DE, Osheroff N
(2011) Biochemistry 50: 3240-9
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Antineoplastic Agents, DNA, DNA Cleavage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, Drug Stability, Etoposide, Humans, Podophyllotoxin, Protein Binding, Spermine, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
F14512 is a novel etoposide derivative that contains a spermine in place of the C4 glycosidic moiety. The drug was designed to exploit the polyamine transport system that is upregulated in some cancers. However, a preliminary study suggests that it is also a more efficacious topoisomerase II poison than etoposide [Barret et al. (2008) Cancer Res. 68, 9845-9853]. Therefore, we undertook a more complete study of the actions of F14512 against human type II topoisomerases. As determined by saturation transfer difference (1)H NMR spectroscopy, contacts between F14512 and human topoisomerase IIα in the binary enzyme-drug complex are similar to those of etoposide. Although the spermine of F14512 does not interact with the enzyme, it converts the drug to a DNA binder [Barret et al. (2008)]. Consequently, the influence of the C4 spermine on drug activity was assessed. F14512 is a highly active topoisomerase II poison and stimulates DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα or topoisomerase IIβ. The drug is more potent and efficacious than etoposide or TOP-53, an etoposide derivative that contains a C4 aminoalkyl group that strengthens drug-enzyme binding. Unlike the other drugs, F14512 maintains robust activity in the absence of ATP. The enhanced activity of F14512 correlates with a tighter binding and an increased stability of the ternary topoisomerase II-drug-DNA complex. The spermine-drug core linkage is critical for these attributes. These findings demonstrate the utility of a C4 DNA binding group and provide a rational basis for the development of novel and more active etoposide-based topoisomerase II poisons.
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13 MeSH Terms
Polyamines Impair Immunity to Helicobacter pylori by Inhibiting L-Arginine Uptake Required for Nitric Oxide Production.
Chaturvedi R, Asim M, Hoge S, Lewis ND, Singh K, Barry DP, de Sablet T, Piazuelo MB, Sarvaria AR, Cheng Y, Closs EI, Casero RA, Gobert AP, Wilson KT
(2010) Gastroenterology 139: 1686-98, 1698.e1-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arginine, Cationic Amino Acid Transporter 2, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gastritis, Gene Expression Regulation, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Immunity, Cellular, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, RNA, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Spermine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Helicobacter pylori-induced immune responses fail to eradicate the bacterium. Nitric oxide (NO) can kill H pylori. However, translation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and NO generation by H pylori-stimulated macrophages is inhibited by the polyamine spermine derived from ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and is dependent on availability of the iNOS substrate L-arginine (L-Arg). We determined if spermine inhibits iNOS-mediated immunity by reducing L-Arg uptake into macrophages.
METHODS - Levels of the inducible cationic amino acid transporter (CAT)2, ODC, and iNOS were measured in macrophages and H pylori gastritis tissues. L-Arg uptake, iNOS expression, and NO levels were assessed in cells with small interfering RNA knockdown of CAT2 or ODC, and in gastric macrophages. The ODC inhibitor, α-difluoromethylornithine, was administered to H pylori-infected mice for 4 months after inoculation.
RESULTS - H pylori induced CAT2 and uptake of L-Arg in RAW 264.7 or primary macrophages. Addition of spermine or knockdown of CAT2 inhibited L-Arg uptake, NO production, and iNOS protein levels, whereas knockdown of ODC had the opposite effect. CAT2 and ODC were increased in mouse and human H pylori gastritis tissues and localized to macrophages. Gastric macrophages from H pylori-infected mice showed increased ODC expression, and attenuated iNOS and NO levels upon ex vivo H pylori stimulation versus cells from uninfected mice. α-Difluoromethylornithine treatment of infected mice restored L-Arg uptake, iNOS protein expression, and NO production in gastric macrophages, and significantly reduced both H pylori colonization levels and gastritis severity.
CONCLUSIONS - Up-regulation of ODC in gastric macrophages impairs host defense against H pylori by suppressing iNOS-derived NO production.
Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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3 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
Structure of B-DNA with cations tethered in the major groove.
Moulaei T, Maehigashi T, Lountos GT, Komeda S, Watkins D, Stone MP, Marky LA, Li JS, Gold B, Williams LD
(2005) Biochemistry 44: 7458-68
MeSH Terms: Cations, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, Deoxyuridine, Models, Molecular, Nucleic Acid Conformation, Nucleic Acid Heteroduplexes, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Spermine, Static Electricity, Thallium, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
Here, we describe the 1.6-A X-ray structure of the DDD (Dickerson-Drew dodecamer), which has been covalently modified by the tethering of four cationic charges. This modified version of the DDD, called here the DDD(4+), is composed of [d(CGCGAAXXCGCG)](2), where X is effectively a thymine residue linked at the 5 position to an n-propyl-amine. The structure was determined from crystals soaked with thallium(I), which has been broadly used as a mimic of K(+) in X-ray diffraction experiments aimed at determining positions of cations adjacent to nucleic acids. Three of the tethered cations are directed radially out from the DNA. The radially directed tethered cations do not appear to induce structural changes or to displace counterions. One of the tethered cations is directed in the 3' direction, toward a phosphate group near one end of the duplex. This tethered cation appears to interact electrostatically with the DNA. This interaction is accompanied by changes in helical parameters rise, roll, and twist and by a displacement of the backbone relative to a control oligonucleotide. In addition, these interactions appear to be associated with displacement of counterions from the major groove of the DNA.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Spermine oxidation induced by Helicobacter pylori results in apoptosis and DNA damage: implications for gastric carcinogenesis.
Xu H, Chaturvedi R, Cheng Y, Bussiere FI, Asim M, Yao MD, Potosky D, Meltzer SJ, Rhee JG, Kim SS, Moss SF, Hacker A, Wang Y, Casero RA, Wilson KT
(2004) Cancer Res 64: 8521-5
MeSH Terms: Apoptosis, DNA Damage, Enzyme Induction, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Gene Silencing, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors, Promoter Regions, Genetic, RNA, Messenger, Spermine, Stomach, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Oxidative stress is linked to carcinogenesis due to its ability to damage DNA. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori exerts much of its pathogenicity by inducing apoptosis and DNA damage in host gastric epithelial cells. Polyamines are abundant in epithelial cells, and when oxidized by the inducible spermine oxidase SMO(PAOh1) H(2)O(2) is generated. Here, we report that H. pylori up-regulates mRNA expression, promoter activity, and enzyme activity of SMO(PAOh1) in human gastric epithelial cells, resulting in DNA damage and apoptosis. H. pylori-induced H(2)O(2) generation and apoptosis in these cells was equally attenuated by an inhibitor of SMO(PAOh1), by catalase, and by transient transfection with small interfering RNA targeting SMO(PAOh1). Conversely, SMO(PAOh1) overexpression induced apoptosis to the same levels as caused by H. pylori. Importantly, in H. pylori-infected tissues, there was increased expression of SMO(PAOh1) in both human and mouse gastritis. Laser capture microdissection of human gastric epithelial cells demonstrated expression of SMO(PAOh1) that was significantly attenuated by H. pylori eradication. These results identify a pathway for oxidative stress-induced epithelial cell apoptosis and DNA damage due to SMO(PAOh1) activation by H. pylori that may contribute to the pathogenesis of the infection and development of gastric cancer.
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18 MeSH Terms
Spermine causes loss of innate immune response to Helicobacter pylori by inhibition of inducible nitric-oxide synthase translation.
Bussière FI, Chaturvedi R, Cheng Y, Gobert AP, Asim M, Blumberg DR, Xu H, Kim PY, Hacker A, Casero RA, Wilson KT
(2005) J Biol Chem 280: 2409-12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Coculture Techniques, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Helicobacter pylori, Immune System, Immunoblotting, Immunoprecipitation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Monocytes, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Protein Biosynthesis, RNA, Small Interfering, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Risk, Spermine, Stomach Neoplasms, Transfection, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach elicits a vigorous but ineffective host immune and inflammatory response, resulting in persistence of the bacterium for the life of the host. We have reported that in macrophages, H. pylori up-regulates inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and antimicrobial NO production, but in parallel there is induction of arginase II, generating ornithine, and of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), generating polyamines. Spermine, in particular, has been shown to restrain immune response in activated macrophages by inhibiting proinflammatory gene expression. We hypothesized that spermine could prevent the antimicrobial effects of NO by inhibiting iNOS in macrophages activated by H. pylori. Spermine did not affect the up-regulation of iNOS mRNA levels but in a concentration-dependent manner significantly attenuated iNOS protein levels and NO production. Reduction in iNOS protein was due to inhibition of iNOS translation and not due to iNOS degradation. ODC knockdown with small interfering (si) RNA resulted in increased H. pylori-stimulated iNOS protein expression and NO production without altering iNOS mRNA levels. When macrophages were cocultured with H. pylori, killing of bacteria was enhanced by transfection of ODC siRNA and prevented by addition of spermine. These results identify a mechanism of immune dysregulation induced by H. pylori in which stimulated spermine synthesis by the arginase-ODC pathway inhibits iNOS translation and NO production, leading to persistence of the bacterium and risk for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.
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25 MeSH Terms
Nitric oxide-induced oxidant stress in endothelial cells: amelioration by ascorbic acid.
May JM, Qu ZC
(2004) Arch Biochem Biophys 429: 106-13
MeSH Terms: Ascorbic Acid, Cell Line, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Endothelial Cells, Humans, Nitric Oxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Oxidative Stress, Spermine
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Nitric oxide has multiple beneficial effects in the blood vessel wall. However, high concentrations of nitric oxide in the presence of hydroperoxides have been shown to damage cultured cells. In this work, the effect of relatively high concentrations of nitric oxide alone on the function and antioxidant status of a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926) was tested. Nitric oxide generated from 0.1 to 0.5mM spermine NONOate generated reactive species in the cells detected by triazole formation from diaminofluorescein and by oxidation of dihydrofluorescein. Intracellular ascorbic acid decreased this oxidant stress. Spermine NONOate also decreased intracellular ascorbate concentrations, although reduced glutathione was not affected unless cells had also been caused to reduce dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbate. Nitric oxide predictably inhibited both endothelial nitric oxide synthase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and ascorbate partially prevented inhibition of the latter enzyme. These results suggest that relatively high concentrations of nitric oxide can cause oxidant stress in endothelial cells that is ameliorated by ascorbic acid.
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9 MeSH Terms