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Assessing matrix quality by Raman spectroscopy helps predict fracture toughness of human cortical bone.
Unal M, Uppuganti S, Timur S, Mahadevan-Jansen A, Akkus O, Nyman JS
(2019) Sci Rep 9: 7195
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bone Density, Cortical Bone, Female, Fractures, Bone, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Developing clinical tools that assess bone matrix quality could improve the assessment of a person's fracture risk. To determine whether Raman spectroscopy (RS) has such potential, we acquired Raman spectra from human cortical bone using microscope- and fiber optic probe-based Raman systems and tested whether correlations between RS and fracture toughness properties were statistically significant. Calculated directly from intensities at wavenumbers identified by second derivative analysis, Amide I sub-peak ratio I/I, not I/I, was negatively correlated with K (N = 58; R = 32.4%) and J-integral (R = 47.4%) when assessed by Raman micro-spectroscopy. Area ratios (A/A) determined from sub-band fitting did not correlate with fracture toughness. There were fewer correlations between RS and fracture toughness when spectra were acquired by probe RS. Nonetheless, the I/I sub-peak ratio again negatively correlated with K (N = 56; R = 25.6%) and J-integral (R = 39.0%). In best-fit general linear models, I/I age, and volumetric bone mineral density explained 50.2% (microscope) and 49.4% (probe) of the variance in K. I/I and vPO/Amide I (microscope) or just I/I (probe) were negative predictors of J-integral (adjusted-R = 54.9% or 37.9%, respectively). While Raman-derived matrix properties appear useful to the assessment of fracture resistance of bone, the acquisition strategy to resolve the Amide I band needs to be identified.
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12 MeSH Terms
Absolute Configurations of Naturally Occurring [5]- and [3]-Ladderanoic Acids: Isolation, Chiroptical Spectroscopy, and Crystallography.
Raghavan V, Johnson JL, Stec DF, Song B, Zajac G, Baranska M, Harris CM, Schley ND, Polavarapu PL, Harris TM
(2018) J Nat Prod 81: 2654-2666
MeSH Terms: Biomass, Bioreactors, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, Esters, Lipids, Molecular Conformation, Molecular Structure, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Stereoisomerism
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
We have isolated mixtures of [5]- and [3]-ladderanoic acids 1a and 2a from the biomass of an anammox bioreactor and have separated the acids and their phenacyl esters for the first time by HPLC. The absolute configurations of the naturally occurring acids and their phenacyl esters are assigned as R at the site of side-chain attachment by comparison of experimental specific rotations with corresponding values predicted using quantum chemical (QC) methods. The absolute configurations for 1a and 2a were independently verified by comparison of experimental Raman optical activity spectra with corresponding spectra predicted using QC methods. The configurational assignments of 1a and 2a and of the phenacyl ester of 1a were also confirmed by X-ray crystallography.
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Dual excitation wavelength system for combined fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy.
Masson LE, O'Brien CM, Pence IJ, Herington JL, Reese J, van Leeuwen TG, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2018) Analyst 143: 6049-6060
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cervix Uteri, Collagen, Female, Gelatin, Mice, Phantoms, Imaging, Pregnancy, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Water
Show Abstract · Added November 26, 2018
A fiber optic probe-based Raman spectroscopy system using a single laser module with two excitation wavelengths, at 680 and 785 nm, has been developed for measuring the fingerprint and high wavenumber regions using a single detector. This system is simpler and less expensive than previously reported configurations of combined fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman systems, and its probe-based implementation facilitates numerous in vivo applications. The high wavenumber region of the Raman spectrum ranges from 2800-3800 cm-1 and contains valuable information corresponding to the molecular vibrations of proteins, lipids, and water, which is complimentary to the biochemical signatures found in the fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1), which probes DNA, lipids, and proteins. The efficacy of the system is demonstrated by tracking changes in water content in tissue-mimicking phantoms, where Voigtian decomposition of the high wavenumber water peak revealed a correlation between the water content and type of water-tissue interactions in the samples. This dual wavelength system was then used for in vivo assessment of cervical remodeling during mouse pregnancy, a physiologic process with known changes in tissue hydration. The system shows that Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in collagen content in the fingerprint region and hydration state in the high wavenumber region, which was verified using an ex vivo comparison of wet and dry weight. Simultaneous fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy will allow precise in vivo quantification of tissue water content in the high wavenumber region, paired with the high biochemical specificity of the fingerprint region.
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10 MeSH Terms
Development of a visually guided Raman spectroscopy probe for cervical assessment during pregnancy.
O'Brien CM, Cochran KJ, Masson LE, Goldberg M, Marple E, Bennett KA, Reese J, Slaughter JC, Newton JM, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2019) J Biophotonics 12: e201800138
MeSH Terms: Cervix Uteri, Equipment Design, Female, Humans, Pregnancy, Spectrum Analysis, Raman
Show Abstract · Added November 26, 2018
Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal death, however, accurate prediction methods do not exist. Detection of early changes in the cervix, an organ that biochemically remodels to deliver the fetus, has potential to predict PTB risk. Researchers have employed light-based methods to monitor biochemical changes in the cervix during pregnancy, however, these approaches required patients to undergo a speculum examination which many patients find uncomfortable and is not standard practice during prenatal care. Herein, a visually guided optical probe is presented that measures the cervix via introduction by bimanual examination, a procedure that is commonly performed during prenatal visits and labor for tactile monitoring of the cervix. The device incorporates a Raman spectroscopy probe for biochemical monitoring and a camera for visualizing measurement location to ensure it is void of cervical mucus and blood. This probe was tested in 15 patients receiving obstetric and gynecological care, and results acquired with and without a speculum revealed similar spectra, demonstrating that the visually guided probe conserved data quality. Additionally, the majority of patients reported reduced discomfort from the device. In summary, the visual guidance probe successfully measured the cervix while integrating with standard prenatal care, reducing a barrier in clinical translation.
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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6 MeSH Terms
Assessing glycation-mediated changes in human cortical bone with Raman spectroscopy.
Unal M, Uppuganti S, Leverant CJ, Creecy A, Granke M, Voziyan P, Nyman JS
(2018) J Biophotonics 11: e201700352
MeSH Terms: Amides, Arginine, Cortical Bone, Female, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Glycosylation, Humans, Kinetics, Lysine, Male, Middle Aged, Spectrum Analysis, Raman
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2018
Establishing a non-destructive method for spatially assessing advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) is a potentially useful step toward investigating the mechanistic role of AGEs in bone quality. To test the hypothesis that the shape of the amide I in the Raman spectroscopy (RS) analysis of bone matrix changes upon AGE accumulation, we incubated paired cadaveric cortical bone in ribose or glucose solutions and in control solutions for 4 and 16 weeks, respectively, at 37°C. Acquiring 10 spectra per bone with a 20X objective and a 830 nm laser, RS was sensitive to AGE accumulation (confirmed by biochemical measurements of pentosidine and fluorescent AGEs). Hyp/Pro ratio increased upon glycation using either 0.1 M ribose, 0.5 M ribose or 0.5 M glucose. Glycation also decreased the amide I sub-peak ratios (cm ) 1668/1638 and 1668/1610 when directly calculated using either second derivative spectrum or local maxima of difference spectrum, though the processing method (eg, averaged spectrum vs individual spectra) to minimize noise influenced detection of differences for the ribose-incubated bones. Glycation however did not affect these sub-peak ratios including the matrix maturity ratio (1668/1690) when calculated using indirect sub-band fitting. The amide I sub-peak ratios likely reflected changes in the collagen I structure.
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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12 MeSH Terms
Low bone toughness in the TallyHO model of juvenile type 2 diabetes does not worsen with age.
Creecy A, Uppuganti S, Unal M, Clay Bunn R, Voziyan P, Nyman JS
(2018) Bone 110: 204-214
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Arginine, Bone Density, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Femur, Fractures, Bone, Lysine, Male, Mice, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2018
Fracture risk increases as type 2 diabetes (T2D) progresses. With the rising incidence of T2D, in particular early-onset T2D, a representative pre-clinical model is needed to study mechanisms for treating or preventing diabetic bone disease. Towards that goal, we hypothesized that fracture resistance of bone from diabetic TallyHO mice decreases as the duration of diabetes increases. Femurs and lumbar vertebrae were harvested from male, TallyHO mice and male, non-diabetic SWR/J mice at 16weeks (n≥12 per strain) and 34weeks (n≥13 per strain) of age. As is characteristic of this model of juvenile T2D, the TallyHO mice were obese and hyperglycemic at an early age (5weeks and 10weeks of age, respectively). The femur mid-shaft of TallyHO mice had higher tissue mineral density and larger cortical area, as determined by micro-computed tomography, compared to the femur mid-shaft of SWR/J mice, irrespective of age. As such, the diabetic rodent bone was structurally stronger than the non-diabetic rodent bone, but the higher peak force endured by the diaphysis during three-point (3pt) bending was not independent of the difference in body weight. Upon accounting for the structure of the femur diaphysis, the estimated toughness at 16weeks and 34weeks was lower for the diabetic mice than for non-diabetic controls, but neither toughness nor estimated material strength and resistance to crack growth (3pt bending of contralateral notched femur) decreased as the duration of hyperglycemia increased. With respect to trabecular bone, there were no differences in the compressive strength of the L6 vertebral strength between diabetic and non-diabetic mice at both ages despite a lower trabecular bone volume for the TallyHO than for the SWR/J mice at 34weeks. Amide I sub-peak ratios as determined by Raman Spectroscopy analysis of the femur diaphysis suggested a difference in collagen structure between diabetic and non-diabetic mice, although there was not a significant difference in matrix pentosidine between the groups. Overall, the fracture resistance of bone in the TallyHO model of T2D did not progressively decrease with increasing duration of hyperglycemia. However, given the variability in hyperglycemia in this model, there were correlations between blood glucose levels and certain structural properties including peak force.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
In vivo Raman spectroscopy for biochemical monitoring of the human cervix throughout pregnancy.
O'Brien CM, Vargis E, Rudin A, Slaughter JC, Thomas G, Newton JM, Reese J, Bennett KA, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2018) Am J Obstet Gynecol 218: 528.e1-528.e18
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cervix Uteri, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Parturition, Postpartum Period, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, First, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Pregnancy Trimester, Third, Spectrum Analysis, Raman
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
BACKGROUND - The cervix must undergo significant biochemical remodeling to allow for successful parturition. This process is not fully understood, especially in instances of spontaneous preterm birth. In vivo Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that can be used to investigate the biochemical composition of tissue longitudinally and noninvasively in human beings, and has been utilized to measure physiology and disease states in a variety of medical applications.
OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study is to measure in vivo Raman spectra of the cervix throughout pregnancy in women, and to identify biochemical markers that change with the preparation for delivery and postpartum repair.
STUDY DESIGN - In all, 68 healthy pregnant women were recruited. Raman spectra were measured from the cervix of each patient monthly in the first and second trimesters, weekly in the third trimester, and at the 6-week postpartum visit. Raman spectra were measured using an in vivo Raman system with an optical fiber probe to excite the tissue with 785 nm light. A spectral model was developed to highlight spectral regions that undergo the most changes throughout pregnancy, which were subsequently used for identifying Raman peaks for further analysis. These peaks were analyzed longitudinally to determine if they underwent significant changes over the course of pregnancy (P < .05). Finally, 6 individual components that comprise key biochemical constituents of the human cervix were measured to extract their contributions in spectral changes throughout pregnancy using a linear combination method. Patient factors including body mass index and parity were included as variables in these analyses.
RESULTS - Raman peaks indicative of extracellular matrix proteins (1248 and 1254 cm) significantly decreased (P < .05), while peaks corresponding to blood (1233 and 1563 cm) significantly increased (P < .0005) in a linear manner throughout pregnancy. In the postpartum cervix, significant increases in peaks corresponding to actin (1003, 1339, and 1657 cm) and cholesterol (1447 cm) were observed when compared to late gestation, while signatures from blood significantly decreased. Postpartum actin signals were significantly higher than early pregnancy, whereas extracellular matrix proteins and water signals were significantly lower than early weeks of gestation. Parity had a significant effect on blood and extracellular matrix protein signals, with nulliparous patients having significant increases in blood signals throughout pregnancy, and higher extracellular matrix protein signals in early pregnancy compared to patients with prior pregnancies. Body mass index significantly affected actin signal contribution, with low body mass index patients showing decreasing actin contribution throughout pregnancy and high body mass index patients demonstrating increasing actin signals.
CONCLUSION - Raman spectroscopy was successfully used to biochemically monitor cervical remodeling in pregnant women during prenatal visits. This foundational study has demonstrated sensitivity to known biochemical dynamics that occur during cervical remodeling, and identified patient variables that have significant effects on Raman spectra throughout pregnancy. Raman spectroscopy has the potential to improve our understanding of cervical maturation, and be used as a noninvasive preterm birth risk assessment tool to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality caused by preterm birth.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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12 MeSH Terms
In vivo Raman spectral analysis of impaired cervical remodeling in a mouse model of delayed parturition.
O'Brien CM, Herington JL, Brown N, Pence IJ, Paria BC, Slaughter JC, Reese J, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 6835
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cervix Uteri, Cyclooxygenase 1, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Female, Lipid Metabolism, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Nucleic Acids, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Term Birth, Uterine Contraction
Show Abstract · Added October 11, 2017
Monitoring cervical structure and composition during pregnancy has high potential for prediction of preterm birth (PTB), a problem affecting 15 million newborns annually. We use in vivo Raman spectroscopy, a label-free, light-based method that provides a molecular fingerprint to non-invasively investigate normal and impaired cervical remodeling. Prostaglandins stimulate uterine contractions and are clinically used for cervical ripening during pregnancy. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1), an enzyme involved in production of these prostaglandins, results in delayed parturition in mice. Contrary to expectation, Cox-1 null mice displayed normal uterine contractility; therefore, this study sought to determine whether cervical changes could explain the parturition differences in Cox-1 null mice and gestation-matched wild type (WT) controls. Raman spectral changes related to extracellular matrix proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids were tracked over pregnancy and found to be significantly delayed in Cox-1 null mice at term. A cervical basis for the parturition delay was confirmed by other ex vivo tests including decreased tissue distensibility, hydration, and elevated progesterone levels in the Cox-1 null mice at term. In conclusion, in vivo Raman spectroscopy non-invasively detected abnormal remodeling in the Cox-1 null mouse, and clearly demonstrated that the cervix plays a key role in their delayed parturition.
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Label-free molecular imaging of the kidney.
Prentice BM, Caprioli RM, Vuiblet V
(2017) Kidney Int 92: 580-598
MeSH Terms: Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Molecular Imaging, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Spectrophotometry, Infrared, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Vibration
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
In this review, we will highlight technologies that enable scientists to study the molecular characteristics of tissues and/or cells without the need for antibodies or other labeling techniques. Specifically, we will focus on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.
Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
Applying Full Spectrum Analysis to a Raman Spectroscopic Assessment of Fracture Toughness of Human Cortical Bone.
Makowski AJ, Granke M, Ayala OD, Uppuganti S, Mahadevan-Jansen A, Nyman JS
(2017) Appl Spectrosc 71: 2385-2394
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bone Density, Collagen, Cortical Bone, Female, Fractures, Bone, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2017
A decline in the inherent quality of bone tissue is a † Equal contributors contributor to the age-related increase in fracture risk. Although this is well-known, the important biochemical factors of bone quality have yet to be identified using Raman spectroscopy (RS), a nondestructive, inelastic light-scattering technique. To identify potential RS predictors of fracture risk, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) to 558 Raman spectra (370-1720 cm) of human cortical bone acquired from 62 female and male donors (nine spectra each) spanning adulthood (age range = 21-101 years). Spectra were analyzed prior to R-curve, nonlinear fracture mechanics that delineate crack initiation (K) from crack growth toughness (K). The traditional νphosphate peak per amide I peak (mineral-to-matrix ratio) weakly correlated with K (r = 0.341, p = 0.0067) and overall crack growth toughness (J-int: r = 0.331, p = 0.0086). Sub-peak ratios of the amide I band that are related to the secondary structure of type 1 collagen did not correlate with the fracture toughness properties. In the full spectrum analysis, one principal component (PC5) correlated with all of the mechanical properties (K: r = - 0.467, K: r = - 0.375, and J-int: r = - 0.428; p < 0.0067). More importantly, when known predictors of fracture toughness, namely age and/or volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), were included in general linear models as covariates, several PCs helped explain 45.0% (PC5) to 48.5% (PC7), 31.4% (PC6), and 25.8% (PC7) of the variance in K, K, and J-int, respectively. Deriving spectral features from full spectrum analysis may improve the ability of RS, a clinically viable technology, to assess fracture risk.
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13 MeSH Terms