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Uncovering matrix effects on lipid analyses in MALDI imaging mass spectrometry experiments.
Perry WJ, Patterson NH, Prentice BM, Neumann EK, Caprioli RM, Spraggins JM
(2020) J Mass Spectrom 55: e4491
MeSH Terms: 2-Naphthylamine, Acetophenones, Animals, Fourier Analysis, Gentisates, Lipids, Liver, Mice, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphatidylethanolamines, Principal Component Analysis, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
The specific matrix used in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) can have an effect on the molecules ionized from a tissue sample. The sensitivity for distinct classes of biomolecules can vary when employing different MALDI matrices. Here, we compare the intensities of various lipid subclasses measured by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) IMS of murine liver tissue when using 9-aminoacridine (9AA), 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (CMBT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), 2,5-Dihydroxyacetophenone (DHA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB). Principal component analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed significant matrix effects on the relative signal intensities observed for different lipid subclasses and adducts. Comparison of spectral profiles and quantitative assessment of the number and intensity of species from each lipid subclass showed that each matrix produces unique lipid signals. In positive ion mode, matrix application methods played a role in the MALDI analysis for different cationic species. Comparisons of different methods for the application of DHA showed a significant increase in the intensity of sodiated and potassiated analytes when using an aerosol sprayer. In negative ion mode, lipid profiles generated using DAN were significantly different than all other matrices tested. This difference was found to be driven by modification of phosphatidylcholines during ionization that enables them to be detected in negative ion mode. These modified phosphatidylcholines are isomeric with common phosphatidylethanolamines confounding MALDI IMS analysis when using DAN. These results show an experimental basis of MALDI analyses when analyzing lipids from tissue and allow for more informed selection of MALDI matrices when performing lipid IMS experiments.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of β- and γ-crystallins in the ocular lens.
Anderson DM, Nye-Wood MG, Rose KL, Donaldson PJ, Grey AC, Schey KL
(2020) J Mass Spectrom 55: e4473
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Animals, Cattle, Humans, Lens, Crystalline, Middle Aged, Molecular Imaging, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, beta-Crystallins, gamma-Crystallins
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Lens crystallin proteins make up 90% of expressed proteins in the ocular lens and are primarily responsible for maintaining lens transparency and establishing the gradient of refractive index necessary for proper focusing of images onto the retina. Age-related modifications to lens crystallins have been linked to insolubilization and cataractogenesis in human lenses. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to provide spatial maps of such age-related modifications. Previous work demonstrated that, under standard protein IMS conditions, α-crystallin signals dominated the mass spectrum and age-related modifications to α-crystallins could be mapped. In the current study, a new sample preparation method was optimized to allow imaging of β- and γ-crystallins in ocular lens tissue. Acquired images showed that γ-crystallins were localized predominately in the lens nucleus whereas β-crystallins were primarily localized to the lens cortex. Age-related modifications such as truncation, acetylation, and carbamylation were identified and spatially mapped. Protein identifications were determined by top-down proteomics analysis of lens proteins extracted from tissue sections and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electron transfer dissociation. This new sample preparation method combined with the standard method allows the major lens crystallins to be mapped by MALDI IMS.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
exhibits heterogeneous siderophore production within the vertebrate host.
Perry WJ, Spraggins JM, Sheldon JR, Grunenwald CM, Heinrichs DE, Cassat JE, Skaar EP, Caprioli RM
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 21980-21982
MeSH Terms: Abscess, Animals, Citrates, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Iron, Mice, Ornithine, Siderophores, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Siderophores, iron-scavenging small molecules, are fundamental to bacterial nutrient metal acquisition and enable pathogens to overcome challenges imposed by nutritional immunity. Multimodal imaging mass spectrometry allows visualization of host-pathogen iron competition, by mapping siderophores within infected tissue. We have observed heterogeneous distributions of siderophores across infectious foci, challenging the paradigm that the vertebrate host is a uniformly iron-depleted environment to invading microbes.
Copyright © 2019 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
0 Communities
3 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
High-Performance Molecular Imaging with MALDI Trapped Ion-Mobility Time-of-Flight (timsTOF) Mass Spectrometry.
Spraggins JM, Djambazova KV, Rivera ES, Migas LG, Neumann EK, Fuetterer A, Suetering J, Goedecke N, Ly A, Van de Plas R, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 14552-14560
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Kidney, Lipids, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Proof of Concept Study, Rats, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables the spatially targeted molecular assessment of biological tissues at cellular resolutions. New developments and technologies are essential for uncovering the molecular drivers of native physiological function and disease. Instrumentation must maximize spatial resolution, throughput, sensitivity, and specificity, because tissue imaging experiments consist of thousands to millions of pixels. Here, we report the development and application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) trapped ion-mobility spectrometry (TIMS) imaging platform. This prototype MALDI timsTOF instrument is capable of 10 μm spatial resolutions and 20 pixels/s throughput molecular imaging. The MALDI source utilizes a Bruker SmartBeam 3-D laser system that can generate a square burn pattern of <10 × 10 μm at the sample surface. General image performance was assessed using murine kidney and brain tissues and demonstrate that high-spatial-resolution imaging data can be generated rapidly with mass measurement errors <5 ppm and ∼40 000 resolving power. Initial TIMS-based imaging experiments were performed on whole-body mouse pup tissue demonstrating the separation of closely isobaric [PC(32:0) + Na] and [PC(34:3) + H] (3 mDa mass difference) in the gas phase. We have shown that the MALDI timsTOF platform can maintain reasonable data acquisition rates (>2 pixels/s) while providing the specificity necessary to differentiate components in complex mixtures of lipid adducts. The combination of high-spatial-resolution and throughput imaging capabilities with high-performance TIMS separations provides a uniquely tunable platform to address many challenges associated with advanced molecular imaging applications.
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2 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Sample Preparation and Analysis of Single Cells Using High Performance MALDI FTICR Mass Spectrometry.
Yang B, Tsui T, Caprioli RM, Norris JL
(2020) Methods Mol Biol 2064: 125-134
MeSH Terms: Animals, Equipment Design, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Metabolome, Metabolomics, Mice, RAW 264.7 Cells, Single-Cell Analysis, Specimen Handling, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful technology that combines the molecular measurements of mass spectrometry with the spatial information inherent to microscopy. This unique combination of capabilities is ideally suited for the analysis of metabolites and lipids from single cells. This chapter describes a methodology for the sample preparation and analysis of single cells using high performance MALDI FTICR MS. Using this approach, we are able to generate profiles of lipid and metabolite expression from single cells that characterize cellular heterogeneity. This approach also enables the detection of variations in the expression profiles of lipids and metabolites induced by chemical stimulation of the cells. These results demonstrate that MALDI IMS provides an insightful view of lipid and metabolite expression useful in the characterization of a number of biological systems at the single cell level.
0 Communities
2 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Combining Salt Doping and Matrix Sublimation for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Neutral Lipids.
Dufresne M, Patterson NH, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 12928-12934
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzoates, Brain, Cerebrosides, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Lipids, Mice, Phospholipids, Sodium Chloride, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
The combination of sodium salt doping of a tissue section along with the sublimation of the matrix 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid (DHB) was found to be an effective coating for the simultaneous detection of neutral lipids and phospholipids using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. Lithium, sodium, and potassium acetate were initially screened for their ability to cationize difficult to analyze neutral lipids such as cholesterol esters, cerebrosides, and triglycerides directly from a tissue section. The combination of sodium salt and DHB sublimation was found to be an effective cation/matrix combination for detection of neutral lipids. Further experimental optimizations revealed that sodium carbonate or sodium phosphate followed by DHB sublimation increases the signal intensity of the neutral lipids studied depending on the specific lipid family and tissue type by 10-fold to 140-fold compared with that of previously published methods. Application of sodium carbonate tissue doping and DHB sublimation resulted in crystal sizes ≤2 μm. We were thus able to image a mouse brain cerebellum at a high spatial resolution and detected 37 cerebrosides in a single run using a MALDI-TOF instrument. The combination of sodium doping and DHB sublimation offer a targeted and sensitive approach for the detection of neutral lipids that do not typically ionize well under normal MALDI conditions.
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2 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
A recommended and verified procedure for in situ tryptic digestion of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues for analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.
Judd AM, Gutierrez DB, Moore JL, Patterson NH, Yang J, Romer CE, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2019) J Mass Spectrom 54: 716-727
MeSH Terms: Formaldehyde, Humans, Paraffin Embedding, Proteins, Proteolysis, Specimen Handling, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Tissue Array Analysis, Tissue Fixation, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) is a molecular imaging technology uniquely capable of untargeted measurement of proteins, lipids, and metabolites while retaining spatial information about their location in situ. This powerful combination of capabilities has the potential to bring a wealth of knowledge to the field of molecular histology. Translation of this innovative research tool into clinical laboratories requires the development of reliable sample preparation protocols for the analysis of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, the standard preservation process in clinical pathology. Although ideal for stained tissue analysis by microscopy, the FFPE process cross-links, disrupts, or can remove proteins from the tissue, making analysis of the protein content challenging. To date, reported approaches differ widely in process and efficacy. This tutorial presents a strategy derived from systematic testing and optimization of key parameters, for reproducible in situ tryptic digestion of proteins in FFPE tissue and subsequent MALDI IMS analysis. The approach describes a generalized method for FFPE tissues originating from virtually any source.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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2 Members
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MeSH Terms
MicroLESA: Integrating Autofluorescence Microscopy, In Situ Micro-Digestions, and Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis for High Spatial Resolution Targeted Proteomic Studies.
Ryan DJ, Patterson NH, Putnam NE, Wilde AD, Weiss A, Perry WJ, Cassat JE, Skaar EP, Caprioli RM, Spraggins JM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 7578-7585
MeSH Terms: Animals, Fluorescent Dyes, Kidney, Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Mice, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Peptides, Proteins, Proteomics, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Staphylococcus aureus, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
The ability to target discrete features within tissue using liquid surface extractions enables the identification of proteins while maintaining the spatial integrity of the sample. Here, we present a liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) workflow, termed microLESA, that allows proteomic profiling from discrete tissue features of ∼110 μm in diameter by integrating nondestructive autofluorescence microscopy and spatially targeted liquid droplet micro-digestion. Autofluorescence microscopy provides the visualization of tissue foci without the need for chemical stains or the use of serial tissue sections. Tryptic peptides are generated from tissue foci by applying small volume droplets (∼250 pL) of enzyme onto the surface prior to LESA. The microLESA workflow reduced the diameter of the sampled area almost 5-fold compared to previous LESA approaches. Experimental parameters, such as tissue thickness, trypsin concentration, and enzyme incubation duration, were tested to maximize proteomics analysis. The microLESA workflow was applied to the study of fluorescently labeled Staphylococcus aureus infected murine kidney to identify unique proteins related to host defense and bacterial pathogenesis. Proteins related to nutritional immunity and host immune response were identified by performing microLESA at the infectious foci and surrounding abscess. These identifications were then used to annotate specific proteins observed in infected kidney tissue by MALDI FT-ICR IMS through accurate mass matching.
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3 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Imaging mass spectrometry enables molecular profiling of mouse and human pancreatic tissue.
Prentice BM, Hart NJ, Phillips N, Haliyur R, Judd A, Armandala R, Spraggins JM, Lowe CL, Boyd KL, Stein RW, Wright CV, Norris JL, Powers AC, Brissova M, Caprioli RM
(2019) Diabetologia 62: 1036-1047
MeSH Terms: Animals, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Gangliosides, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Islets of Langerhans, Mice, Pancreas, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added May 7, 2019
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS - The molecular response and function of pancreatic islet cells during metabolic stress is a complex process. The anatomical location and small size of pancreatic islets coupled with current methodological limitations have prevented the achievement of a complete, coherent picture of the role that lipids and proteins play in cellular processes under normal conditions and in diseased states. Herein, we describe the development of untargeted tissue imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) technologies for the study of in situ protein and, more specifically, lipid distributions in murine and human pancreases.
METHODS - We developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) IMS protocols to study metabolite, lipid and protein distributions in mouse (wild-type and ob/ob mouse models) and human pancreases. IMS allows for the facile discrimination of chemically similar lipid and metabolite isoforms that cannot be distinguished using standard immunohistochemical techniques. Co-registration of MS images with immunofluorescence images acquired from serial tissue sections allowed accurate cross-registration of cell types. By acquiring immunofluorescence images first, this serial section approach guides targeted high spatial resolution IMS analyses (down to 15 μm) of regions of interest and leads to reduced time requirements for data acquisition.
RESULTS - MALDI IMS enabled the molecular identification of specific phospholipid and glycolipid isoforms in pancreatic islets with intra-islet spatial resolution. This technology shows that subtle differences in the chemical structure of phospholipids can dramatically affect their distribution patterns and, presumably, cellular function within the islet and exocrine compartments of the pancreas (e.g. 18:1 vs 18:2 fatty acyl groups in phosphatidylcholine lipids). We also observed the localisation of specific GM3 ganglioside lipids [GM3(d34:1), GM3(d36:1), GM3(d38:1) and GM3(d40:1)] within murine islet cells that were correlated with a higher level of GM3 synthase as verified by immunostaining. However, in human pancreas, GM3 gangliosides were equally distributed in both the endocrine and exocrine tissue, with only one GM3 isoform showing islet-specific localisation.
CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION - The development of more complete molecular profiles of pancreatic tissue will provide important insight into the molecular state of the pancreas during islet development, normal function, and diseased states. For example, this study demonstrates that these results can provide novel insight into the potential signalling mechanisms involving phospholipids and glycolipids that would be difficult to detect by targeted methods, and can help raise new hypotheses about the types of physiological control exerted on endocrine hormone-producing cells in islets. Importantly, the in situ measurements afforded by IMS do not require a priori knowledge of molecules of interest and are not susceptible to the limitations of immunohistochemistry, providing the opportunity for novel biomarker discovery. Notably, the presence of multiple GM3 isoforms in mouse islets and the differential localisation of lipids in human tissue underscore the important role these molecules play in regulating insulin modulation and suggest species, organ, and cell specificity. This approach demonstrates the importance of both high spatial resolution and high molecular specificity to accurately survey the molecular composition of complex, multi-functional tissues such as the pancreas.
1 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Imaging Mass Spectrometry: A Perspective.
Caprioli RM
(2019) J Biomol Tech 30: 7-11
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Brain Chemistry, Kidney, Mice, Molecular Imaging, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as an important imaging modality because of its broad non-specific nature for molecular detection from highly complex samples. Within this broad field, new sub-categories of technologies have been developed incorporating many different molecular ionization processes. This article will focus on one of the major ionization processes, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). IMS provides a critically important technology that brings new insight into complex biological samples and opens the door to new discoveries. Applications range widely, from fundamental studies in biology to specific clinical issues, all addressing the need to understand molecular spatial distributions at the tissue and cellular levels.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms