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Dynamics of Zebrafish Heart Regeneration Using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS Approach.
Ma D, Tu C, Sheng Q, Yang Y, Kan Z, Guo Y, Shyr Y, Scott IC, Lou X
(2018) J Proteome Res 17: 1300-1308
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Fish Proteins, Gene Ontology, Heart Injuries, Heart Ventricles, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Molecular Sequence Annotation, Myocardium, Proteomics, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Regeneration, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Failure to properly repair damaged due to myocardial infarction is a major cause of heart failure. In contrast with adult mammals, zebrafish hearts show remarkable regenerative capabilities after substantial damage. To characterize protein dynamics during heart regeneration, we employed an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (mass spectrometry) approach. Myocardium tissues were taken from sham-operated fish and ventricle-resected sample at three different time points (2, 7, and 14 days); dynamics of protein expression were analyzed by an ion-current-based quantitative platform. More than 2000 protein groups were quantified in all 16 experiments. Two hundred and nine heart-regeneration-related protein groups were quantified and clustered into six time-course patterns. Functional analysis indicated that multiple molecular function and metabolic pathways were involved in heart regeneration. Interestingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that P53 signaling was inhibited during the heart regeneration, which was further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). In summary, we applied systematic proteomics analysis on regenerating zebrafish heart, uncovered the dynamics of regenerative genes expression and regulatory pathways, and provided invaluable insight into design regenerative-based strategies in human hearts.
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15 MeSH Terms
Determining Double Bond Position in Lipids Using Online Ozonolysis Coupled to Liquid Chromatography and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.
Harris RA, May JC, Stinson CA, Xia Y, McLean JA
(2018) Anal Chem 90: 1915-1924
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chickens, Chromatography, Liquid, Eggs, Fatty Acids, Unsaturated, Glycerophospholipids, Isomerism, Lipids, Ozone, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
The increasing focus on lipid metabolism has revealed a need for analytical techniques capable of structurally characterizing lipids with a high degree of specificity. Lipids can exist as any one of a large number of double bond positional isomers, which are indistinguishable by single-stage mass spectrometry alone. Ozonolysis reactions coupled to mass spectrometry have previously been demonstrated as a means for localizing double bonds in unsaturated lipids. Here we describe an online, solution-phase reactor using ozone produced via a low-pressure mercury lamp, which generates aldehyde products diagnostic of cleavage at a particular double bond position. This flow-cell device is utilized in conjunction with structurally selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The lamp-mediated reaction was found to be effective for multiple lipid species in both positive and negative ionization modes, and the conversion efficiency from precursor to product ions was tunable across a wide range (20-95%) by varying the flow rate through the ozonolysis device. Ion mobility separation of the ozonolysis products generated additional structural information and revealed the presence of saturated species in a complex mixture. The method presented here is simple, robust, and readily coupled to existing instrument platforms with minimal modifications necessary. For these reasons, application to standard lipidomic workflows is possible and aids in more comprehensive structural characterization of a myriad of lipid species.
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10 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of Collision Cross Section Calibrants for Structural Analysis of Lipids by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.
Hines KM, May JC, McLean JA, Xu L
(2016) Anal Chem 88: 7329-36
MeSH Terms: Calibration, Ions, Nitrogen, Peptides, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphatidylethanolamines, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
Collision cross section (CCS) measurement of lipids using traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIM-MS) is of high interest to the lipidomics field. However, currently available calibrants for CCS measurement using TWIM are predominantly peptides that display quite different physical properties and gas-phase conformations from lipids, which could lead to large CCS calibration errors for lipids. Here we report the direct CCS measurement of a series of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) in nitrogen using a drift tube ion mobility (DTIM) instrument and an evaluation of the accuracy and reproducibility of PCs and PEs as CCS calibrants for phospholipids against different classes of calibrants, including polyalanine (PolyAla), tetraalkylammonium salts (TAA), and hexakis(fluoroalkoxy)phosphazines (HFAP), in both positive and negative modes in TWIM-MS analysis. We demonstrate that structurally mismatched calibrants lead to larger errors in calibrated CCS values while the structurally matched calibrants, PCs and PEs, gave highly accurate and reproducible CCS values at different traveling wave parameters. Using the lipid calibrants, the majority of the CCS values of several classes of phospholipids measured by TWIM are within 2% error of the CCS values measured by DTIM. The development of phospholipid CCS calibrants will enable high-accuracy structural studies of lipids and add an additional level of validation in the assignment of identifications in untargeted lipidomics experiments.
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Platelet Lipidomic Profiling: Novel Insight into Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α Activity and Its Role in Human Platelet Activation.
Duvernay MT, Matafonov A, Lindsley CW, Hamm HE
(2015) Biochemistry 54: 5578-88
MeSH Terms: Benzoates, Blood Platelets, Glycerophospholipids, Group IV Phospholipases A2, Humans, Lipids, Oligopeptides, Peptide Fragments, Platelet Activation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptor, PAR-1, Receptors, Thrombin, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Stress, Mechanical, Sulfonamides, Thrombin
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
With a newer, more selective and efficacious cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) inhibitor available, we revisited the role of cPLA2α activity in platelet activation and discovered that a component of platelet signaling, even larger than previously appreciated, relies on this enzyme. In a whole blood shear-based flow chamber assay, giripladib, a cPLA2α inhibitor, reduced platelet adhesion and accumulation on collagen. Moreover, giripladib differentially affected P-selectin expression and GPIIbIIIa activation depending on the agonist employed. While protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet activation was unaffected by giripladib, the levels of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated platelet activation were significantly reduced. Meanwhile, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist SQ29548 had no effect on PAR-, GPVI-, or puriniergic receptor-mediated platelet activation, suggesting that another eicosanoid produced downstream of arachidonic acid liberation by cPLA2α was responsible for this large component of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated platelet activation. In parallel, we profiled PAR-mediated changes in glycerophospholipid (GPL) mass with and without giripladib to better understand cPLA2α-mediated lipid metabolism. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) demonstrated the largest consumption of mass during thrombin stimulation. Additionally, we confirm phosphatidylinositol as a major substrate of cPLA2α. A comparison of PAR1- and PAR4-induced metabolism revealed the consumption of more putative arachidonyl-PE species downstream of PAR1 activation. Instead of enhanced cPLA2α activity and therefore more arachidonic acid liberation downstream of PAR4, these results indicate the major role that cPLA2α activity plays in platelet function and suggest that a novel eicosanoid is produced in response to platelet activation that represents a large component of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated responses.
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MeSH Terms
Polymerase Bypass of N(6)-Deoxyadenosine Adducts Derived from Epoxide Metabolites of 1,3-Butadiene.
Kotapati S, Wickramaratne S, Esades A, Boldry EJ, Quirk Dorr D, Pence MG, Guengerich FP, Tretyakova NY
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 1496-507
MeSH Terms: Butadienes, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, DNA, DNA Adducts, DNA Primers, DNA Replication, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Deoxyadenosines, Epoxy Compounds, Humans, Kinetics, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
N(6)-(2-Hydroxy-3-buten-1-yl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (N(6)-HB-dA I) and N(6),N(6)-(2,3-dihydroxybutan-1,4-diyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine (N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA) are exocyclic DNA adducts formed upon alkylation of the N(6) position of adenine in DNA by epoxide metabolites of 1,3-butadiene (BD), a common industrial and environmental chemical classified as a human and animal carcinogen. Since the N(6)-H atom of adenine is required for Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with thymine, N(6)-alkylation can prevent adenine from normal pairing with thymine, potentially compromising the accuracy of DNA replication. To evaluate the ability of BD-derived N(6)-alkyladenine lesions to induce mutations, synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing site-specific (S)-N(6)-HB-dA I and (R,R)-N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA adducts were subjected to in vitro translesion synthesis in the presence of human DNA polymerases β, η, ι, and κ. While (S)-N(6)-HB-dA I was readily bypassed by all four enzymes, only polymerases η and κ were able to carry out DNA synthesis past (R,R)-N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA. Steady-state kinetic analyses indicated that all four DNA polymerases preferentially incorporated the correct base (T) opposite (S)-N(6)-HB-dA I. In contrast, hPol β was completely blocked by (R,R)-N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA, while hPol η and κ inserted A, G, C, or T opposite the adduct with similar frequency. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of primer extension products confirmed that while translesion synthesis past (S)-N(6)-HB-dA I was mostly error-free, replication of DNA containing (R,R)-N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA induced significant numbers of A, C, and G insertions and small deletions. These results indicate that singly substituted (S)-N(6)-HB-dA I lesions are not miscoding, but that exocyclic (R,R)-N(6),N(6)-DHB-dA adducts are strongly mispairing, probably due to their inability to form stable Watson-Crick pairs with dT.
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13 MeSH Terms
Structural Characterization of Methylenedianiline Regioisomers by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Strategies. 2. Electrospray Spectra of 3-Ring and 4-Ring Isomers.
Stow SM, Onifer TM, Forsythe JG, Nefzger H, Kwiecien NW, May JC, McLean JA, Hercules DM
(2015) Anal Chem 87: 6288-96
MeSH Terms: Aniline Compounds, Computer Simulation, Molecular Structure, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Stereoisomerism, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
Building on results from our previous study of 2-ring methylenedianiline (MDA), a combined mass spectrometry approach utilizing ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with computational methods enables the structural characterization of purified 3-ring and 4-ring MDA regioisomers in this current study. The preferred site of protonation for the 3-ring and 4-ring MDA was determined to be on the amino groups. Additionally, the location of the protonated amine along the MDA multimer was found to influence the gas phase stability of these molecules. Fragmentation mechanisms similar to the 2-ring MDA species were observed for both the 3-ring and 4-ring MDA. The structural characterization of 3-ring and 4-ring MDA isomers using modern MS techniques may aid polyurethane synthesis by the characterization of industrial grade MDA, multimeric MDA species, and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) mixtures.
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MeSH Terms
Strategies for generating peptide radical cations via ion/ion reactions.
Gilbert JD, Fisher CM, Bu J, Prentice BM, Redwine JG, McLuckey SA
(2015) J Mass Spectrom 50: 418-26
MeSH Terms: Azo Compounds, Cations, Peptides, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Show Abstract · Added August 17, 2016
Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266-nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide, while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process.
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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4 MeSH Terms
Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by dramatic changes in phospholipid profiles.
Marien E, Meister M, Muley T, Fieuws S, Bordel S, Derua R, Spraggins J, Van de Plas R, Dehairs J, Wouters J, Bagadi M, Dienemann H, Thomas M, Schnabel PA, Caprioli RM, Waelkens E, Swinnen JV
(2015) Int J Cancer 137: 1539-48
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Phosphatidylinositols, Phospholipids, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Sphingomyelins, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2015
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death globally. To develop better diagnostics and more effective treatments, research in the past decades has focused on identification of molecular changes in the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and more recently also the metabolome. Phospholipids, which nevertheless play a central role in cell functioning, remain poorly explored. Here, using a mass spectrometry (MS)-based phospholipidomics approach, we profiled 179 phospholipid species in malignant and matched non-malignant lung tissue of 162 NSCLC patients (73 in a discovery cohort and 89 in a validation cohort). We identified 91 phospholipid species that were differentially expressed in cancer versus non-malignant tissues. Most prominent changes included a decrease in sphingomyelins (SMs) and an increase in specific phosphatidylinositols (PIs). Also a decrease in multiple phosphatidylserines (PSs) was observed, along with an increase in several phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, particularly those with 40 or 42 carbon atoms in both fatty acyl chains together. 2D-imaging MS of the most differentially expressed phospholipids confirmed their differential abundance in cancer cells. We identified lipid markers that can discriminate tumor versus normal tissue and different NSCLC subtypes with an AUC (area under the ROC curve) of 0.999 and 0.885, respectively. In conclusion, using both shotgun and 2D-imaging lipidomics analysis, we uncovered a hitherto unrecognized alteration in phospholipid profiles in NSCLC. These changes may have important biological implications and may have significant potential for biomarker development.
© 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.
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8 MeSH Terms
Characterization of thioether-linked protein adducts of DNA using a Raney-Ni-mediated desulfurization method and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.
Chowdhury G, Guengerich FP
(2015) Curr Protoc Nucleic Acid Chem 60: 10.15.1-10.15.14
MeSH Terms: Chromatography, Liquid, DNA, DNA Adducts, Molecular Structure, Nucleosides, Peptides, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Sulfides
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
This unit contains a complete procedure for the detection and structural characterization of DNA protein crosslinks (DPCs). The procedure also describes an approach for the quantitation of the various structurally distinct DPCs. Although various methods have been described in the literature for labile DPCs, characterization of nonlabile adducts remain a challenge. Here we present a novel approach for characterization of both labile and non-labile adducts by the use of a combination of chemical, enzymatic, and mass spectrometric approaches. A Raney Ni-catalyzed reductive desulfurization method was used for removal of the bulky peptide adducts, enzymatic digestion was used to digest the protein to smaller peptides and DNA to nucleosides, and finally LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MS) was utilized for detection and characterization of nucleoside adducts.
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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8 MeSH Terms
Ion/ion reactions with "onium" reagents: an approach for the gas-phase transfer of organic cations to multiply-charged anions.
Gilbert JD, Prentice BM, McLuckey SA
(2015) J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 26: 818-25
MeSH Terms: Alkylation, CME-Carbodiimide, Catalysis, Chelating Agents, Cross-Linking Reagents, Edetic Acid, Energy Transfer, Hot Temperature, Indicators and Reagents, Models, Molecular, Oligopeptides, Organophosphorus Compounds, Protein Conformation, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Static Electricity, Sulfonium Compounds, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tetraethylammonium, Volatilization
Show Abstract · Added August 17, 2016
The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase.
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20 MeSH Terms