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Three months of weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid is less hepatotoxic than nine months of daily isoniazid for LTBI.
Bliven-Sizemore EE, Sterling TR, Shang N, Benator D, Schwartzman K, Reves R, Drobeniuc J, Bock N, Villarino ME, TB Trials Consortium
(2015) Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 19: 1039-44, i-v
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antitubercular Agents, Aspartate Aminotransferases, Brazil, Canada, Case-Control Studies, Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury, Drug Administration Schedule, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Hepatitis C, Humans, Isoniazid, Latent Tuberculosis, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Rifampin, Risk Factors, Spain, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
SETTING - Nine months of daily isoniazid (9H) and 3 months of once-weekly rifapentine plus isoniazid (3HP) are recommended treatments for latent tuberculous infection (LTBI). The risk profile for 3HP and the contribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to hepatotoxicity are unclear.
OBJECTIVES - To evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk associated with 3HP compared to 9H, and factors associated with hepatotoxicity.
DESIGN - Hepatotoxicity was defined as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) >3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) with symptoms (nausea, vomiting, jaundice, or fatigue), or AST >5 x ULN. We analyzed risk factors among adults who took at least 1 dose of their assigned treatment. A nested case-control study assessed the role of HCV.
RESULTS - Of 6862 participants, 77 (1.1%) developed hepatotoxicity; 52 (0.8%) were symptomatic; 1.8% (61/3317) were on 9H and 0.4% (15/3545) were on 3HP (P < 0.0001). Risk factors for hepatotoxicity were age, female sex, white race, non-Hispanic ethnicity, decreased body mass index, elevated baseline AST, and 9H. In the case-control study, HCV infection was associated with hepatotoxicity when controlling for other factors.
CONCLUSION - The risk of hepatotoxicity during LTBI treatment with 3HP was lower than the risk with 9H. HCV and elevated baseline AST were risk factors for hepatotoxicity. For persons with these risk factors, 3HP may be preferred.
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21 MeSH Terms
Evidence for validity of the brief resilient coping scale in a young Spanish sample.
Limonero JT, Tomás-Sábado J, Gómez-Romero MJ, Maté-Méndez J, Sinclair VG, Wallston KA, Gómez-Benito J
(2014) Span J Psychol 17: E34
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Female, Humans, Male, Psychometrics, Resilience, Psychological, Spain, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
The aim of the present study was to provide evidence of validity of the Brief Resilient Coping Scale for use in Spanish young population. A total of 365 university students responded to the Spanish version of the BRCS as well as to other tools for measuring personal perceived competence, life satisfaction, depression, anxiety, negative and positive affect, and coping strategies. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the unidimensional structure of the scale. Internal consistency reliability and temporal stability through Cronbach's alpha and test-retest correlations, respectively, were comparable to those found in the initial validation of the tool. The BRCS showed positive and significant correlations with personal perceived competence, optimism, life satisfaction, positive affect (p < .01), and some coping strategies (p < .05). Significant negative correlations were observed with depression, anxiety and negative affect. (p < .01). Multiple regression analysis with stepwise method showed that positive affect, negative affect, optimism and problem solving explained 41.8% of the variance of the BRCS (p < .001). The Spanish adaptation of the BRCS in a young population is satisfactory and comparable to those of the original version and with the Spanish version adapted in an elderly population. This supports its validity as a tool for the assessment of resilient coping tendencies in young people who speak Spanish and offers researchers and professionals interested in this area of study a simple tool for assessing it.
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11 MeSH Terms
Molecular markers and biological targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer: expert opinion and recommendations derived from the 11th ESMO/World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, 2009.
Van Cutsem E, Dicato M, Arber N, Berlin J, Cervantes A, Ciardiello F, De Gramont A, Diaz-Rubio E, Ducreux M, Geva R, Glimelius B, Glynne Jones R, Grothey A, Gruenberger T, Haller D, Haustermans K, Labianca R, Lenz HJ, Minsky B, Nordlinger B, Ohtsu A, Pavlidis N, Rougier P, Schmiegel W, Van de Velde C, Schmoll HJ, Sobrero A, Tabernero J
(2010) Ann Oncol 21 Suppl 6: vi1-10
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Colorectal Neoplasms, ErbB Receptors, Humans, Microsatellite Instability, Mutation, Neoplasm Metastasis, Prognosis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Spain, ras Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The article summarizes the expert discussion and recommendations on the use of molecular markers and of biological targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), as well as a proposed treatment decision strategy for mCRC treatment. The meeting was conducted during the 11th ESMO/World Gastrointestinal Cancer Congress (WGICC) in Barcelona in June 2009. The manuscript describes the outcome of an expert discussion leading to an expert recommendation. The increasing knowledge on clinical and molecular markers and the availability of biological targeted therapies have major implications in the optimal management in mCRC.
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15 MeSH Terms
Human papillomavirus is not associated with colorectal cancer in a large international study.
Gornick MC, Castellsague X, Sanchez G, Giordano TJ, Vinco M, Greenson JK, Capella G, Raskin L, Rennert G, Gruber SB, Moreno V
(2010) Cancer Causes Control 21: 737-43
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Alphapapillomavirus, Case-Control Studies, Cell Transformation, Viral, Colorectal Neoplasms, DNA, Viral, Female, Humans, Israel, Male, Papillomavirus Infections, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Spain, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY - Recent publications have reported an association between colon cancer and human papillomaviruses (HPV), suggesting that HPV infection of the colonic mucosa may contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.
METHODS - The GP5+/GP6+ PCR reverse line blot method was used for detection of 37 types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in DNA from paraffin-embedded or frozen tissues from patients with colorectal cancer (n = 279) and normal adjacent tissue (n = 30) in three different study populations, including samples from the United States (n = 73), Israel (n = 106) and Spain (n = 100). Additionally, SPF10 PCR was run on all samples (n = 279) and the Innogenetics INNO-LiPA assay was performed on a subset of samples (n = 15).
RESULTS - All samples were negative for all types of HPV using both the GP5+/GP6+ PCR reverse line blot method and the SPF10 INNO-LiPA method.
CONCLUSIONS - We conclude that HPV types associated with malignant transformation do not meaningfully contribute to adenocarcinoma of the colon.
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14 MeSH Terms
Probable identity-by-descent for a mutation in the Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen/Smith-McCort dysplasia (Dymeclin) gene among patients from Guam, Chile, Argentina, and Spain.
Pogue R, Ehtesham N, Repetto GM, Carrero-Valenzuela R, de Casella CB, de Pons SP, Martínez-Frías ML, Heuertz S, Cormier-Daire V, Cohn DH
(2005) Am J Med Genet A 138: 75-8
MeSH Terms: Abnormalities, Multiple, Argentina, Chile, DNA Mutational Analysis, Family Health, Female, Growth Disorders, Guam, Haplotypes, Humans, Intellectual Disability, Male, Mutation, Osteochondrodysplasias, Pedigree, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Proteins, Spain, Syndrome
Added June 26, 2013
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19 MeSH Terms
Ancestry explains the blunted ventilatory response to sustained hypoxia and lower exercise ventilation of Quechua altitude natives.
Brutsaert TD, Parra EJ, Shriver MD, Gamboa A, Rivera-Ch M, León-Velarde F
(2005) Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 289: R225-34
MeSH Terms: Adult, Altitude, Arteries, European Continental Ancestry Group, Exercise, Exercise Test, Humans, Hypoxia, Indians, South American, Male, Oxygen, Oxygen Consumption, Peru, Pulmonary Ventilation, Spain, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Andean high-altitude (HA) natives have a low (blunted) hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR), lower effective alveolar ventilation, and lower ventilation (VE) at rest and during exercise compared with acclimatized newcomers to HA. Despite blunted chemosensitivity and hypoventilation, Andeans maintain comparable arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))). This study was designed to evaluate the influence of ancestry on these trait differences. At sea level, we measured the HVR in both acute (HVR-A) and sustained (HVR-S) hypoxia in a sample of 32 male Peruvians of mainly Quechua and Spanish origins who were born and raised at sea level. We also measured resting and exercise VE after 10-12 h of exposure to altitude at 4,338 m. Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) was assessed for each individual using a panel of 80 ancestry-informative molecular markers (AIMs). NAAP was inversely related to HVR-S after 10 min of isocapnic hypoxia (r = -0.36, P = 0.04) but was not associated with HVR-A. In addition, NAAP was inversely related to exercise VE (r = -0.50, P = 0.005) and ventilatory equivalent (VE/Vo(2), r = -0.51, P = 0.004) measured at 4,338 m. Thus Quechua ancestry may partly explain the well-known blunted HVR (10, 35, 36, 57, 62) at least to sustained hypoxia, and the relative exercise hypoventilation at altitude of Andeans compared with European controls. Lower HVR-S and exercise VE could reflect improved gas exchange and/or attenuated chemoreflex sensitivity with increasing NAAP. On the basis of these ancestry associations and on the fact that developmental effects were completely controlled by study design, we suggest both a genetic basis and an evolutionary origin for these traits in Quechua.
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16 MeSH Terms
Spanish genetic admixture is associated with larger V(O2) max decrement from sea level to 4338 m in Peruvian Quechua.
Brutsaert TD, Parra EJ, Shriver MD, Gamboa A, Palacios JA, Rivera M, Rodriguez I, León-Velarde F
(2003) J Appl Physiol (1985) 95: 519-28
MeSH Terms: Adult, Altitude, Arteries, DNA, European Continental Ancestry Group, Genetic Markers, Humans, Indians, South American, Least-Squares Analysis, Male, Models, Biological, Multivariate Analysis, Oxygen, Oxygen Consumption, Peru, Spain
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Quechua in the Andes may be genetically adapted to altitude and able to resist decrements in maximal O2 consumption in hypoxia (DeltaVo2 max). This hypothesis was tested via repeated measures of Vo2 max (sea level vs. 4338 m) in 30 men of mixed Spanish and Quechua origins. Individual genetic admixture level (%Spanish ancestry) was estimated by using ancestry-informative DNA markers. Genetic admixture explained a significant proportion of the variability in DeltaVo2 max after control for covariate effects, including sea level Vo2 max and the decrement in arterial O2 saturation measured at Vo2 max (DeltaSpO2 max) (R2 for admixture and covariate effects approximately 0.80). The genetic effect reflected a main effect of admixture on DeltaVo2 max (P = 0.041) and an interaction between admixture and DeltaSpO2 max (P = 0.018). Admixture predicted DeltaVo2 max only in subjects with a large DeltaSpO2 max (P = 0.031). In such subjects, DeltaVo2 max was 12-18% larger in a subgroup of subjects with high vs. low Spanish ancestry, with least squares mean values (+/-SE) of 739 +/- 71 vs. 606 +/- 68 ml/min, respectively. A trend for interaction (P = 0.095) was also noted between admixture and the decrease in ventilatory threshold at 4338 m. As previously, admixture predicted DeltaVo2 max only in subjects with a large decrease in ventilatory threshold. These findings suggest that the genetic effect on DeltaVo2 max depends on a subject's aerobic fitness. Genetic effects may be more important (or easier to detect) in athletic subjects who are more likely to show gas-exchange impairment during exercise. The results of this study are consistent with the evolutionary hypothesis and point to a better gas-exchange system in Quechua.
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16 MeSH Terms