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Communication About the Probability of Cancer in Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules.
Maiga AW, Deppen SA, Massion PP, Callaway-Lane C, Pinkerman R, Dittus RS, Lambright ES, Nesbitt JC, Grogan EL
(2018) JAMA Surg 153: 353-357
MeSH Terms: Aged, Communication, Documentation, Female, Guideline Adherence, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Medical Records, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Probability, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
Importance - Clinical guidelines recommend that clinicians estimate the probability of malignancy for patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs) larger than 8 mm. Adherence to these guidelines is unknown.
Objectives - To determine whether clinicians document the probability of malignancy in high-risk IPNs and to compare these quantitative or qualitative predictions with the validated Mayo Clinic Model.
Design, Setting, and Participants - Single-institution, retrospective cohort study of patients from a tertiary care Department of Veterans Affairs hospital from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2015. Cohort 1 included 291 veterans undergoing surgical resection of known or suspected lung cancer from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2015. Cohort 2 included a random sample of 239 veterans undergoing inpatient or outpatient pulmonary evaluation of IPNs at the hospital from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012.
Exposures - Clinician documentation of the quantitative or qualitative probability of malignancy.
Main Outcomes and Measures - Documentation from pulmonary and/or thoracic surgery clinicians as well as information from multidisciplinary tumor board presentations was reviewed. Any documented quantitative or qualitative predictions of malignancy were extracted and summarized using descriptive statistics. Clinicians' predictions were compared with risk estimates from the Mayo Clinic Model.
Results - Of 291 patients in cohort 1, 282 (96.9%) were men; mean (SD) age was 64.6 (9.0) years. Of 239 patients in cohort 2, 233 (97.5%) were men; mean (SD) age was 65.5 (10.8) years. Cancer prevalence was 258 of 291 cases (88.7%) in cohort 1 and 110 of 225 patients with a definitive diagnosis (48.9%) in cohort 2. Only 13 patients (4.5%) in cohort 1 and 3 (1.3%) in cohort 2 had a documented quantitative prediction of malignancy prior to tissue diagnosis. Of the remaining patients, 217 of 278 (78.1%) in cohort 1 and 149 of 236 (63.1%) in cohort 2 had qualitative statements of cancer risk. In cohort 2, 23 of 79 patients (29.1%) without any documented malignancy risk statements had a final diagnosis of cancer. Qualitative risk statements were distributed among 32 broad categories. The most frequently used statements aligned well with Mayo Clinic Model predictions for cohort 1 compared with cohort 2. The median Mayo Clinic Model-predicted probability of cancer was 68.7% (range, 2.4%-100.0%). Qualitative risk statements roughly aligned with Mayo predictions.
Conclusions and Relevance - Clinicians rarely provide quantitative documentation of cancer probability for high-risk IPNs, even among patients drawn from a broad range of cancer probabilities. Qualitative statements of cancer risk in current practice are imprecise and highly variable. A standard scale that correlates with predicted cancer risk for IPNs should be used to communicate with patients and other clinicians.
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16 MeSH Terms
Identification of Proteomic Features To Distinguish Benign Pulmonary Nodules from Lung Adenocarcinoma.
Codreanu SG, Hoeksema MD, Slebos RJC, Zimmerman LJ, Rahman SMJ, Li M, Chen SC, Chen H, Eisenberg R, Liebler DC, Massion PP
(2017) J Proteome Res 16: 3266-3276
MeSH Terms: 5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Proteins, Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Adult, Aged, Antigens, CD, Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase, Biomarkers, Tumor, CD11 Antigens, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, GPI-Linked Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Glucose Transporter Type 3, Humans, Integrin alpha Chains, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Proteins, Proteomics, Respiratory Mucosa, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tissue Array Analysis, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
We hypothesized that distinct protein expression features of benign and malignant pulmonary nodules may reveal novel candidate biomarkers for the early detection of lung cancer. We performed proteome profiling by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to characterize 34 resected benign lung nodules, 24 untreated lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs), and biopsies of bronchial epithelium. Group comparisons identified 65 proteins that differentiate nodules from ADCs and normal bronchial epithelium and 66 proteins that differentiate ADCs from nodules and normal bronchial epithelium. We developed a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay to quantify a subset of 43 of these candidate biomarkers in an independent cohort of 20 benign nodules, 21 ADCs, and 20 normal bronchial biopsies. PRM analyses confirmed significant nodule-specific abundance of 10 proteins including ALOX5, ALOX5AP, CCL19, CILP1, COL5A2, ITGB2, ITGAX, PTPRE, S100A12, and SLC2A3 and significant ADC-specific abundance of CEACAM6, CRABP2, LAD1, PLOD2, and TMEM110-MUSTN1. Immunohistochemistry analyses for seven selected proteins performed on an independent set of tissue microarrays confirmed nodule-specific expression of ALOX5, ALOX5AP, ITGAX, and SLC2A3 and cancer-specific expression of CEACAM6. These studies illustrate the value of global and targeted proteomics in a systematic process to identify and qualify candidate biomarkers for noninvasive molecular diagnosis of lung cancer.
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27 MeSH Terms
The Pursuit of Noninvasive Diagnosis of Lung Cancer.
Atwater T, Cook CM, Massion PP
(2016) Semin Respir Crit Care Med 37: 670-680
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Multiple Pulmonary Nodules, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
The noninvasive diagnosis of lung cancer remains a formidable challenge. Although tissue diagnosis will remain the gold standard for the foreseeable future, questions pertaining to the risks and costs associated with invasive diagnostic procedures are of prime relevance. This review addresses new modalities for improving the noninvasive evaluation of suspicious lung nodules. Ultimately, the goal is to translate early diagnosis into early treatment. We discuss how biomarkers could assist in distinguishing benign from malignant nodules and aggressive from indolent tumors. The field of biomarkers is rapidly expanding and progressing, and efforts are well underway to apply molecular diagnostics to address the shortcomings of current lung cancer diagnostic tools.
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
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5 MeSH Terms
Radiological Image Traits Predictive of Cancer Status in Pulmonary Nodules.
Liu Y, Balagurunathan Y, Atwater T, Antic S, Li Q, Walker RC, Smith GT, Massion PP, Schabath MB, Gillies RJ
(2017) Clin Cancer Res 23: 1442-1449
MeSH Terms: Aged, Female, Humans, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Radiography, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
We propose a systematic methodology to quantify incidentally identified pulmonary nodules based on observed radiological traits (semantics) quantified on a point scale and a machine-learning method using these data to predict cancer status. We investigated 172 patients who had low-dose CT images, with 102 and 70 patients grouped into training and validation cohorts, respectively. On the images, 24 radiological traits were systematically scored and a linear classifier was built to relate the traits to malignant status. The model was formed both with and without size descriptors to remove bias due to nodule size. The multivariate pairs formed on the training set were tested on an independent validation data set to evaluate their performance. The best 4-feature set that included a size measurement (set 1), was short axis, contour, concavity, and texture, which had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.88 (accuracy = 81%, sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 91.7%). If size measures were excluded, the four best features (set 2) were location, fissure attachment, lobulation, and spiculation, which had an AUROC of 0.83 (accuracy = 73.2%, sensitivity = 73.8%, specificity = 81.7%) in predicting malignancy in primary nodules. The validation test AUROC was 0.8 (accuracy = 74.3%, sensitivity = 66.7%, specificity = 75.6%) and 0.74 (accuracy = 71.4%, sensitivity = 61.9%, specificity = 75.5%) for sets 1 and 2, respectively. Radiological image traits are useful in predicting malignancy in lung nodules. These semantic traits can be used in combination with size-based measures to enhance prediction accuracy and reduce false-positives. .
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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11 MeSH Terms
Autoantibody Signature Enhances the Positive Predictive Power of Computed Tomography and Nodule-Based Risk Models for Detection of Lung Cancer.
Massion PP, Healey GF, Peek LJ, Fredericks L, Sewell HF, Murray A, Robertson JF
(2017) J Thorac Oncol 12: 578-584
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Autoantibodies, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Pulmonary Nodules, Neoplasm Staging, Prognosis, ROC Curve, Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
INTRODUCTION - The incidence of pulmonary nodules is increasing with the movement toward screening for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given the large number of benign nodules detected by computed tomography, an adjunctive test capable of distinguishing malignant from benign nodules would benefit practitioners. The ability of the EarlyCDT-Lung blood test (Oncimmune Ltd., Nottingham, United Kingdom) to make this distinction by measuring autoantibodies to seven tumor-associated antigens was evaluated in a prospective registry.
METHODS - Of the members of a cohort of 1987 individuals with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act authorization, those with pulmonary nodules detected, imaging, and pathology reports were reviewed. All patients for whom a nodule was identified within 6 months of testing by EarlyCDT-Lung were included. The additivity of the test to nodule size and nodule-based risk models was explored.
RESULTS - A total of 451 patients (32%) had at least one nodule, leading to 296 eligible patients after exclusions, with a lung cancer prevalence of 25%. In 4- to 20-mm nodules, a positive test result represented a greater than twofold increased relative risk for development of lung cancer as compared with a negative test result. Also, when the "both-positive rule" for combining binary tests was used, adding EarlyCDT-Lung to risk models improved diagnostic performance with high specificity (>92%) and positive predictive value (>70%).
CONCLUSIONS - A positive autoantibody test result reflects a significant increased risk for malignancy in lung nodules 4 to 20 mm in largest diameter. These data confirm that EarlyCDT-Lung may add value to the armamentarium of the practitioner in assessing the risk for malignancy in indeterminate pulmonary nodules.
Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Cost-effectiveness of initial diagnostic strategies for pulmonary nodules presenting to thoracic surgeons.
Deppen SA, Davis WT, Green EA, Rickman O, Aldrich MC, Fletcher S, Putnam JB, Grogan EL
(2014) Ann Thorac Surg 98: 1214-22
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Fine-Needle, Bronchoscopy, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Decision Support Techniques, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Surgeons, Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added October 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Patients presenting to thoracic surgeons with pulmonary nodules suggestive of lung cancer have varied diagnostic options including navigation bronchoscopy (NB), computed tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration (CT-FNA), (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We studied the relative cost-effective initial diagnostic strategy for a 1.5- to 2-cm nodule suggestive of cancer.
METHODS - A decision analysis model was developed to assess the costs and outcomes of four initial diagnostic strategies for diagnosis of a 1.5- to 2-cm nodule with either a 50% or 65% pretest probability of cancer. Medicare reimbursement rates were used for costs. Quality-adjusted life years were estimated using patient survival based on pathologic staging and utilities derived from the literature.
RESULTS - When cancer prevalence was 65%, tissue acquisition strategies of NB and CT-FNA had higher quality-adjusted life years compared with either FDG-PET or VATS, and VATS was the most costly strategy. In sensitivity analyses, NB and CT-FNA were more cost-effective than FDG-PET when FDG-PET specificity was less than 72%. When cancer prevalence was 50%, NB, CT-FNA, and FDG-PET had similar cost-effectiveness.
CONCLUSIONS - Both NB and CT-FNA diagnostic strategies are more cost-effective than either VATS biopsy or FDG-PET scan to diagnose lung cancer in moderate- to high-risk nodules and resulted in fewer nontherapeutic operations when FDG-PET specificity was less than 72%. An FDG-PET scan for diagnosis of lung cancer may not be cost-effective in regions of the country where specificity is low.
Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Cancer in pulmonary nodules detected on first screening CT.
Maldonado F, Peikert T, Midthun D
(2013) N Engl J Med 369: 2060
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Radiography, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule
Added February 1, 2016
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7 MeSH Terms
A blood-based proteomic classifier for the molecular characterization of pulmonary nodules.
Li XJ, Hayward C, Fong PY, Dominguez M, Hunsucker SW, Lee LW, McLean M, Law S, Butler H, Schirm M, Gingras O, Lamontagne J, Allard R, Chelsky D, Price ND, Lam S, Massion PP, Pass H, Rom WN, Vachani A, Fang KC, Hood L, Kearney P
(2013) Sci Transl Med 5: 207ra142
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Neoplasm Proteins, Proteomics, Reproducibility of Results, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Each year, millions of pulmonary nodules are discovered by computed tomography and subsequently biopsied. Because most of these nodules are benign, many patients undergo unnecessary and costly invasive procedures. We present a 13-protein blood-based classifier that differentiates malignant and benign nodules with high confidence, thereby providing a diagnostic tool to avoid invasive biopsy on benign nodules. Using a systems biology strategy, we identified 371 protein candidates and developed a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assay for each. The MRM assays were applied in a three-site discovery study (n = 143) on plasma samples from patients with benign and stage IA lung cancer matched for nodule size, age, gender, and clinical site, producing a 13-protein classifier. The classifier was validated on an independent set of plasma samples (n = 104), exhibiting a negative predictive value (NPV) of 90%. Validation performance on samples from a nondiscovery clinical site showed an NPV of 94%, indicating the general effectiveness of the classifier. A pathway analysis demonstrated that the classifier proteins are likely modulated by a few transcription regulators (NF2L2, AHR, MYC, and FOS) that are associated with lung cancer, lung inflammation, and oxidative stress networks. The classifier score was independent of patient nodule size, smoking history, and age, which are risk factors used for clinical management of pulmonary nodules. Thus, this molecular test provides a potential complementary tool to help physicians in lung cancer diagnosis.
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13 MeSH Terms
Noninvasive characterization of the histopathologic features of pulmonary nodules of the lung adenocarcinoma spectrum using computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield (CANARY)--a pilot study.
Maldonado F, Boland JM, Raghunath S, Aubry MC, Bartholmai BJ, Deandrade M, Hartman TE, Karwoski RA, Rajagopalan S, Sykes AM, Yang P, Yi ES, Robb RA, Peikert T
(2013) J Thorac Oncol 8: 452-60
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Carcinoma in Situ, Cluster Analysis, Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Pulmonary Nodules, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Staging, Pilot Projects, Prognosis, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Risk Assessment, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added February 1, 2016
INTRODUCTION - Pulmonary nodules of the adenocarcinoma spectrum are characterized by distinctive morphological and radiologic features and variable prognosis. Noninvasive high-resolution computed tomography-based risk stratification tools are needed to individualize their management.
METHODS - Radiologic measurements of histopathologic tissue invasion were developed in a training set of 54 pulmonary nodules of the adenocarcinoma spectrum and validated in 86 consecutively resected nodules. Nodules were isolated and characterized by computer-aided analysis, and data were analyzed by Spearman correlation, sensitivity, and specificity and the positive and negative predictive values.
RESULTS - Computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield (CANARY) can noninvasively characterize pulmonary nodules of the adenocarcinoma spectrum. Unsupervised clustering analysis of high-resolution computed tomography data identified nine unique exemplars representing the basic radiologic building blocks of these lesions. The exemplar distribution within each nodule correlated well with the proportion of histologic tissue invasion, Spearman R = 0.87, p < 0.0001 and 0.89 and p < 0.0001 for the training and the validation set, respectively. Clustering of the exemplars in three-dimensional space corresponding to tissue invasion and lepidic growth was used to develop a CANARY decision algorithm that successfully categorized these pulmonary nodules as "aggressive" (invasive adenocarcinoma) or "indolent" (adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of this approach for the detection of aggressive lesions were 95.4, 96.8, 95.4, and 96.8%, respectively, in the training set and 98.7, 63.6, 94.9, and 87.5%, respectively, in the validation set.
CONCLUSION - CANARY represents a promising tool to noninvasively risk stratify pulmonary nodules of the adenocarcinoma spectrum.
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23 MeSH Terms
Development and validation of a plasma biomarker panel for discerning clinical significance of indeterminate pulmonary nodules.
Daly S, Rinewalt D, Fhied C, Basu S, Mahon B, Liptay MJ, Hong E, Chmielewski G, Yoder MA, Shah PN, Edell ES, Maldonado F, Bungum AO, Borgia JA
(2013) J Thorac Oncol 8: 31-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Area Under Curve, Biomarkers, Tumor, Chemokine CCL3, Chemokine CXCL12, Cytokines, Female, Granuloma, Humans, Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein, Interleukin-10, Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit, Interleukin-6, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Pulmonary Nodules, Pneumonia, Predictive Value of Tests, ROC Curve, Radiography, Respiratory Tract Infections, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 1, 2016
INTRODUCTION - The recent findings of the National Lung Screening Trial showed 24.2% of individuals at high risk for lung cancer having one or more indeterminate nodules detected by low-dose computed tomography-based screening, 96.4% of which were eventually confirmed as false positives. These positive scans necessitate additional diagnostic procedures to establish a definitive diagnosis that adds cost and risk to the paradigm. A plasma test able to assign benign versus malignant pathology in high-risk patients would be an invaluable tool to complement low-dose computed tomography-based screening and promote its rapid implementation.
METHODS - We evaluated 17 biomarkers, previously shown to have value in detecting lung cancer, against a discovery cohort, comprising benign (n = 67) cases and lung cancer (n = 69) cases. A Random Forest method based analysis was used to identify the optimal biomarker panel for assigning disease status, which was then validated against a cohort from the Mayo Clinic, comprising patients with benign (n = 61) or malignant (n = 20) indeterminate lung nodules.
RESULTS - Our discovery efforts produced a seven-analyte plasma biomarker panel consisting of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-1ra, sIL-2Rα, stromal cell-derived factor-1α+β, tumor necrosis factor α, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 α. The sensitivity and specificity of our panel in our validation cohort is 95.0% and 23.3%, respectively. The validated negative predictive value of our panel was 93.8%.
CONCLUSION - We developed a seven-analyte plasma biomarker panel able to identify benign nodules, otherwise deemed indeterminate, with a high degree of accuracy. This panel may have clinical utility in risk-stratifying screen-detected lung nodules, decrease unnecessary follow-up imaging or invasive procedures, and potentially avoid unnecessary morbidity, mortality, and health care costs.
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27 MeSH Terms