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High salt intake reprioritizes osmolyte and energy metabolism for body fluid conservation.
Kitada K, Daub S, Zhang Y, Klein JD, Nakano D, Pedchenko T, Lantier L, LaRocque LM, Marton A, Neubert P, Schröder A, Rakova N, Jantsch J, Dikalova AE, Dikalov SI, Harrison DG, Müller DN, Nishiyama A, Rauh M, Harris RC, Luft FC, Wassermann DH, Sands JM, Titze J
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 1944-1959
MeSH Terms: Animals, Energy Metabolism, Kidney, Liver, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Sodium, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Urea, Water-Electrolyte Balance
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Natriuretic regulation of extracellular fluid volume homeostasis includes suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, pressure natriuresis, and reduced renal nerve activity, actions that concomitantly increase urinary Na+ excretion and lead to increased urine volume. The resulting natriuresis-driven diuretic water loss is assumed to control the extracellular volume. Here, we have demonstrated that urine concentration, and therefore regulation of water conservation, is an important control system for urine formation and extracellular volume homeostasis in mice and humans across various levels of salt intake. We observed that the renal concentration mechanism couples natriuresis with correspondent renal water reabsorption, limits natriuretic osmotic diuresis, and results in concurrent extracellular volume conservation and concentration of salt excreted into urine. This water-conserving mechanism of dietary salt excretion relies on urea transporter-driven urea recycling by the kidneys and on urea production by liver and skeletal muscle. The energy-intense nature of hepatic and extrahepatic urea osmolyte production for renal water conservation requires reprioritization of energy and substrate metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle, resulting in hepatic ketogenesis and glucocorticoid-driven muscle catabolism, which are prevented by increasing food intake. This natriuretic-ureotelic, water-conserving principle relies on metabolism-driven extracellular volume control and is regulated by concerted liver, muscle, and renal actions.
1 Communities
3 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Inflammatory cytokines regulate renal sodium transporters: how, where, and why?
Norlander AE, Madhur MS
(2017) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 313: F141-F144
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Pressure, Cytokines, Epithelial Cells, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Humans, Hypertension, Inflammation Mediators, Kidney, Membrane Transport Proteins, Renal Reabsorption, Signal Transduction, Sodium Chloride, Dietary
Show Abstract · Added September 7, 2017
Hypertension is growing in epidemic proportions worldwide and is now the leading preventable cause of premature death. For over a century, we have known that the kidney plays a critical role in blood pressure regulation. Specifically, abnormalities in renal sodium transport appear to be a final common pathway that gives rise to elevated blood pressure regardless of the nature of the initial hypertensive stimulus. However, it is only in the past decade that we have come to realize that inflammatory cytokines secreted by innate and adaptive immune cells, as well as renal epithelial cells, can modulate the expression and activity of sodium transporters all along the nephron, leading to alterations in pressure natriuresis, sodium and water balance, and ultimately hypertension. This mini-review highlights specific cytokines and the transporters that they regulate and discusses why inflammatory cytokines may have evolved to serve this function.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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13 MeSH Terms
Cardio-Oncology: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitors, Salt, and Macrophages: A Complicated Interaction.
Moslehi J, Pandey AK, Bhatia N
(2017) Hypertension 69: 785-786
MeSH Terms: Humans, Macrophages, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Added March 26, 2017
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1 Members
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6 MeSH Terms
Do high-salt microenvironments drive hypertensive inflammation?
Foss JD, Kirabo A, Harrison DG
(2017) Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 312: R1-R4
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cellular Microenvironment, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Nephritis, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Vasculitis
Show Abstract · Added December 27, 2017
Hypertension is a global epidemic affecting over one billion people worldwide. Despite this, the etiology of most cases of human hypertension remains obscure, and treatment remains suboptimal. Excessive dietary salt and inflammation are known contributors to the pathogenesis of this disease. Recently, it has been recognized that salt can accumulate in the skin and skeletal muscle, producing concentrations of sodium greater than the plasma in hypertensive animals and humans. Such elevated levels of sodium have been shown to alter immune cell function. Here, we propose a model in which tissue salt accumulation causes an immune response leading to renal and vascular inflammation and hypertension.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (HETE)-dependent Hypertension in Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A11 Transgenic Mice: NORMALIZATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE BY SODIUM RESTRICTION, HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE, OR BLOCKADE OF THE TYPE 1 ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR.
Savas Ü, Wei S, Hsu MH, Falck JR, Guengerich FP, Capdevila JH, Johnson EF
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 16904-19
MeSH Terms: Angiotensins, Animals, Blood Pressure, Cytochrome P-450 CYP4A, Female, Humans, Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids, Hypertension, Losartan, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Transgenic, Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1, Renin-Angiotensin System, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 3
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Male and female homozygous 129/Sv mice carrying four copies of the human cytochrome P450 4A11 gene (CYP4A11) under control of its native promoter (B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+)) develop hypertension (142 ± 8 versus 113 ± 7 mm Hg systolic blood pressure (BP)), and exhibit increased 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in kidney and urine. The hypertension is reversible by a low-sodium diet and by the CYP4A inhibitor HET0016. B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice display an 18% increase of plasma potassium (p < 0.02), but plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II (ANGII), and renin activities are unchanged. This phenotype resembles human genetic disorders with elevated activity of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) and, accordingly, NCC abundance is increased by 50% in transgenic mice, and NCC levels are normalized by HET0016. ANGII is known to increase NCC abundance, and renal mRNA levels of its precursor angiotensinogen are increased 2-fold in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+), and blockade of the ANGII receptor type 1 with losartan normalizes BP. A pro-hypertensive role for 20-HETE was implicated by normalization of BP and reversal of renal angiotensin mRNA increases by administration of the 20-HETE antagonists 2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)acetate or (S)-2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)succinate. SGK1 expression is also increased in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice and paralleled increases seen for NCC. Losartan, HET0016, and 20-HETE antagonists each normalized SGK1 mRNA expression. These results point to a potential 20-HETE dependence of intrarenal angiotensinogen production and ANGII receptor type 1 activation that are associated with increases in NCC and SGK1 and identify elevated P450 4A11 activity and 20-HETE as potential risk factors for salt-sensitive human hypertension by perturbation of the renal renin-angiotensin axis.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
CD70 Exacerbates Blood Pressure Elevation and Renal Damage in Response to Repeated Hypertensive Stimuli.
Itani HA, Xiao L, Saleh MA, Wu J, Pilkinton MA, Dale BL, Barbaro NR, Foss JD, Kirabo A, Montaniel KR, Norlander AE, Chen W, Sato R, Navar LG, Mallal SA, Madhur MS, Bernstein KE, Harrison DG
(2016) Circ Res 118: 1233-43
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Pressure, CD27 Ligand, Hypertension, Inflammation Mediators, Kidney Diseases, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added April 25, 2016
RATIONALE - Accumulating evidence supports a role of adaptive immunity and particularly T cells in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Formation of memory T cells, which requires the costimulatory molecule CD70 on antigen-presenting cells, is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity.
OBJECTIVE - To test the hypothesis that CD70 and immunologic memory contribute to the blood pressure elevation and renal dysfunction mediated by repeated hypertensive challenges.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We imposed repeated hypertensive challenges using either N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME)/high salt or repeated angiotensin II stimulation in mice. During these challenges effector memory T cells (T(EM)) accumulated in the kidney and bone marrow. In the L-NAME/high-salt model, memory T cells of the kidney were predominant sources of interferon-γ and interleukin-17A, known to contribute to hypertension. L-NAME/high salt increased macrophage and dendritic cell surface expression of CD70 by 3- to 5-fold. Mice lacking CD70 did not accumulate T(EM) cells and did not develop hypertension to either high salt or the second angiotensin II challenge and were protected against renal damage. Bone marrow-residing T(EM) cells proliferated and redistributed to the kidney in response to repeated salt feeding. Adoptively transferred T(EM) cells from hypertensive mice homed to the bone marrow and spleen and expanded on salt feeding of the recipient mice.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings illustrate a previously undefined role of CD70 and long-lived T(EM) cells in the development of blood pressure elevation and end-organ damage that occur on delayed exposure to mild hypertensive stimuli. Interventions to prevent repeated hypertensive surges could attenuate formation of hypertension-specific T(EM) cells.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
1 Communities
3 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori adaptation in vivo in response to a high-salt diet.
Loh JT, Gaddy JA, Algood HM, Gaudieri S, Mallal S, Cover TL
(2015) Infect Immun 83: 4871-83
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Base Sequence, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Genome, Bacterial, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Iron, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Oxidative Stress, Proteome, Repressor Proteins, Sodium Chloride, Dietary
Show Abstract · Added October 8, 2015
Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment.
Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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3 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Alteration of the Helicobacter pylori membrane proteome in response to changes in environmental salt concentration.
Voss BJ, Loh JT, Hill S, Rose KL, McDonald WH, Cover TL
(2015) Proteomics Clin Appl 9: 1021-34
MeSH Terms: Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Helicobacter pylori, Membrane Proteins, Movement, Proteome, Proteomics, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added October 8, 2015
PURPOSE - Helicobacter pylori infection and a high dietary salt intake are each risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. We hypothesize that changes in environmental salt concentrations lead to alterations in the H. pylori membrane proteome.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - Label-free and iTRAQ methods were used to identify H. pylori proteins that change in abundance in response to alterations in environmental salt concentrations. In addition, we biotinylated intact bacteria that were grown under high- or low-salt conditions, and thereby analyzed salt-induced changes in the abundance of surface-exposed proteins.
RESULTS - Proteins with increased abundance in response to high salt conditions included CagA, the outer membrane protein HopQ, and fibronectin domain-containing protein HP0746. Proteins with increased abundance in response to low salt conditions included VacA, two VacA-like proteins (ImaA and FaaA), outer-membrane iron transporter FecA3, and several proteins involved in flagellar activity. Consistent with the proteomic data, bacteria grown in high salt conditions exhibited decreased motility compared to bacteria grown in lower salt conditions.
CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE - Alterations in the H. pylori membrane proteome in response to high salt conditions may contribute to the increased risk of gastric cancer associated with a high salt diet.
© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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2 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Results of a novel screening tool measuring dietary sodium knowledge in patients with chronic kidney disease.
Wright Nunes JA, Anderson CA, Greene JH, Ikizler TA, Cavanaugh KL
(2015) BMC Nephrol 16: 42
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Attitude to Health, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Sex Factors, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added August 4, 2015
BACKGROUND - Reducing dietary sodium has potential to benefit patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Little research is available defining dietary sodium knowledge gaps in patients with pre-dialysis CKD. We designed a brief screening tool to rapidly identify patient knowledge gaps related to dietary sodium for patients with CKD not yet on dialysis.
METHODS - A Short Sodium Knowledge Survey (SSKS) was developed and administered to patients with pre-dialysis CKD. We also asked patients if they received counseling on dietary sodium reduction and about recommended intake limits. We performed logistic regression to examine the association between sodium knowledge and patient characteristics. Characteristics of patients who answered all SSKS questions correctly were compared to those who did not.
RESULTS - One-hundred fifty-five patients were surveyed. The mean (SD) age was 56.6 (15.1) years, 84 (54%) were men, and 119 (77%) were white. Sixty-seven patients (43.2%) correctly identified their daily intake sodium limit. Fifty-eight (37.4%) were unable to answer all survey questions correctly. In analysis adjusted for age, sex, race, education, health literacy, CKD stage, self-reported hypertension and attendance in a kidney education class, women and patients of non-white race had lower odds of correctly answering survey questions (0.36 [0.16,0.81]; p = 0.01 women versus men and 0.33 [0.14,0.76]; p = 0.01 non-white versus white, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS - Our survey provides a mechanism to quickly identify dietary sodium knowledge gaps in patients with CKD. Women and patients of non-white race may have knowledge barriers impeding adherence to sodium reduction advice.
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19 MeSH Terms
Aldosterone modulates thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter abundance via DUSP6-mediated ERK1/2 signaling pathway.
Feng X, Zhang Y, Shao N, Wang Y, Zhuang Z, Wu P, Lee MJ, Liu Y, Wang X, Zhuang J, Delpire E, Gu D, Cai H
(2015) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 308: F1119-27
MeSH Terms: Aldosterone, Animals, Dual Specificity Phosphatase 6, Electrolytes, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Models, Animal, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Signal Transduction, Sodium Chloride Symporters, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Thiazides, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2015
Thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) plays an important role in maintaining blood pressure. Aldosterone is known to modulate NCC abundance. Previous studies reported that dietary salts modulated NCC abundance through either WNK4 [with no lysine (k) kinase 4]-SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase) or WNK4-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. To exclude the influence of SPAK signaling pathway on the role of the aldosterone-mediated ERK1/2 pathway in NCC regulation, we investigated the effects of dietary salt changes and aldosterone on NCC abundance in SPAK knockout (KO) mice. We found that in SPAK KO mice low-salt diet significantly increased total NCC abundance while reducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas high-salt diet decreased total NCC while increasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Importantly, exogenous aldosterone administration increased total NCC abundance in SPAK KO mice while increasing DUSP6 expression, an ERK1/2-specific phosphatase, and led to decreasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation without changing the ratio of phospho-T53-NCC/total NCC. In mouse distal convoluted tubule (mDCT) cells, aldosterone increased DUSP6 expression while reducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. DUSP6 Knockdown increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation while reducing total NCC expression. Inhibition of DUSP6 by (E)-2-benzylidene-3-(cyclohexylamino)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-one increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reversed the aldosterone-mediated increments of NCC partly by increasing NCC ubiquitination. Therefore, these data suggest that aldosterone modulates NCC abundance via altering NCC ubiquitination through a DUSP6-dependent ERK1/2 signal pathway in SPAK KO mice and part of the effects of dietary salt changes may be mediated by aldosterone in the DCTs.
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15 MeSH Terms