Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 22

Publication Record

Connections

Ideal Cardiovascular Health, Cardiovascular Remodeling, and Heart Failure in Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study.
Spahillari A, Talegawkar S, Correa A, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Lima J, Freedman JE, Das S, Kociol R, de Ferranti S, Mohebali D, Mwasongwe S, Tucker KL, Murthy VL, Shah RV
(2017) Circ Heart Fail 10:
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, Comorbidity, Diabetes Mellitus, Exercise, Female, Health Status Disparities, Heart Failure, Humans, Hypertension, Incidence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine, Male, Middle Aged, Mississippi, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Risk Reduction Behavior, Sedentary Behavior, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Smoking Prevention, Ventricular Function, Left, Ventricular Remodeling
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND - The lifetime risk of heart failure (HF) is higher in the black population than in other racial groups in the United States.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We measured the Life's Simple 7 ideal cardiovascular health metrics in 4195 blacks in the JHS (Jackson Heart Study; 2000-2004). We evaluated the association of Simple 7 metrics with incident HF and left ventricular structure and function by cardiac magnetic resonance (n=1188). Mean age at baseline was 54.4 years (65% women). Relative to 0 to 2 Simple 7 factors, blacks with 3 factors had 47% lower incident HF risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.73; <0.0001); and those with ≥4 factors had 61% lower HF risk (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24-0.64; =0.0002). Higher blood pressure (HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.28-4.20; =0.005), physical inactivity (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.07-2.55; =0.02), smoking (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.43-2.91; <0.0001), and impaired glucose control (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.34-2.29; <0.0001) were associated with incident HF. The age-/sex-adjusted population attributable risk for these Simple 7 metrics combined was 37.1%. Achievement of ideal blood pressure, ideal body mass index, ideal glucose control, and nonsmoking was associated with less likelihood of adverse cardiac remodeling by cardiac magnetic resonance.
CONCLUSIONS - Cardiovascular risk factors in midlife (specifically elevated blood pressure, physical inactivity, smoking, and poor glucose control) are associated with incident HF in blacks and represent targets for intensified HF prevention.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
29 MeSH Terms
Cardiology Patient Page. ABCDE Steps for Heart and Vascular Wellness Following a Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.
Guan J, Khambhati J, Jones LW, Morgans A, Allaf M, Penson DF, Moslehi J
(2015) Circulation 132: e218-20
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Androgen Antagonists, Androgens, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Cardiovascular Diseases, Comorbidity, Diabetes Mellitus, Diet, Disease Susceptibility, Exercise, Health Promotion, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Life Style, Male, Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent, Prostatic Neoplasms, Risk Factors, Smoking Cessation, Survivors
Added February 4, 2016
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Lung cancer screening and smoking cessation: a teachable moment?
Deppen SA, Grogan EL, Aldrich MC, Massion PP
(2014) J Natl Cancer Inst 106: dju122
MeSH Terms: Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mass Screening, Smoking, Smoking Cessation
Added February 16, 2016
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Optimizing blood pressure control in patients with nondiabetic glomerular disease.
Umanath K, Lewis JB, Dwyer JP
(2014) Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 21: 200-4
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Humans, Hypertension, Patient Care Planning, Proteinuria, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Severity of Illness Index, Smoking Cessation
Show Abstract · Added October 28, 2014
Hypertension is a common problem among patients with glomerular disease and CKD. Optimal blood pressure targets for these patients have been the source of much debate. Careful review of the available data supports a blood pressure target of less than 140/90 mmHg. Consideration for a lower goal of less than 130/80 mmHg should be given for patients with heavy proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors should be used as the cornerstone of therapy for all patients with glomerular disease and CKD.
Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Optimizing natural fertility: the role of lifestyle modification.
McLean M, Wellons MF
(2012) Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am 39: 465-77
MeSH Terms: Adult, Alcohol Drinking, Body Mass Index, Coitus, Directive Counseling, Evidence-Based Medicine, Exercise, Female, Fertility, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Patient Education as Topic, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Preconception Care, Pregnancy, Risk Reduction Behavior, Smoking Cessation, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
Preconception counseling provides an opportunity for health care providers to promote maternal and neonatal health, and to make recommendations regarding the optimization of natural fertility. While educating patients on the negative impact of maternal obesity on fertility and maternal and neonatal health; many health care providers recommend weight loss to reduce these negative outcomes. The recommendations start with lifestyle modifications, including diet and exercise. This article focuses on the available evidence regarding lifestyle modifications and fertility, and on the type of lifestyle modifications that health care providers should recommend to patients seeking to optimize their natural fertility.
Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Therapeutic procedures for coronary vasospasm-induced polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.
Dresen WF, Wells QS, Maron DJ, McPherson JA
(2012) Ther Adv Cardiovasc Dis 6: 115-21
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Calcium Channel Blockers, Coronary Vasospasm, Defibrillators, Implantable, Drug-Eluting Stents, Electrocardiography, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Smoking Cessation, Tachycardia, Ventricular
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
Coronary vasospasm is an unusual cause of angina and myocardial ischemia, with the potential to provoke acute myocardial infarction, malignant cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis is largely clinical and requires a high index of suspicion. Provocation studies are rarely performed due to the risks of the procedure and the relatively low incidence of disease. A subset of patients does not respond to conventional medical therapy and a paucity of evidence exists to guide therapy. While generally believed a multifocal phenomenon, there have been reports of successful treatment of focal, refractory vasospasm with coronary stent implantation. Furthermore, consideration of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is warranted when vasospasm is complicated by lethal ventricular arrhythmias.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Lung cancer risk among smokers of menthol cigarettes.
Blot WJ, Cohen SS, Aldrich M, McLaughlin JK, Hargreaves MK, Signorello LB
(2011) J Natl Cancer Inst 103: 810-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Case-Control Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Menthol, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Southeastern United States
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
BACKGROUND - Menthol cigarettes, preferred by African American smokers, have been conjectured to be harder to quit and to contribute to the excess lung cancer burden among black men in the Unites States. However, data showing an association between smoking menthol cigarettes and increased lung cancer risk compared with smoking nonmenthol cigarettes are limited. The Food and Drug Administration is currently considering whether to ban the sale of menthol cigarettes in the United States.
METHODS - We conducted a prospective study among 85,806 racially diverse adults enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study during March 2002 to September 2009 according to cigarette smoking status, with smokers classified by preference for menthol vs nonmenthol cigarettes. Among 12,373 smokers who responded to a follow-up questionnaire, we compared rates of quitting between menthol and nonmenthol smokers. In a nested case-control analysis of 440 incident lung cancer case patients and 2213 matched control subjects, using logistic regression modeling we computed odds ratios (ORs) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer incidence, and applied Cox proportional hazards modeling to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of lung cancer mortality, according to menthol preference.
RESULTS - Among both blacks and whites, menthol smokers reported smoking fewer cigarettes per day; an average of 1.6 (95% CI = 1.3 to 2.0) fewer for blacks and 1.8 (95% CI = 1.3 to 2.3) fewer for whites, compared with nonmenthol smokers. During an average of 4.3 years of follow-up, 21% of participants smoking at baseline had quit, with menthol and nonmenthol smokers having equal odds of quitting (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.89 to 1.16). A lower lung cancer incidence was noted in menthol vs nonmenthol smokers (for smokers of <10, 10-19, and ≥ 20 cigarettes per day, compared with never smokers, OR = 5.0 vs 10.3, 8.7 vs 12.9, and 12.2 vs 21.1, respectively). These trends were mirrored for lung cancer mortality. In multivariable analyses adjusted for pack-years of smoking, menthol cigarettes were associated with a lower lung cancer incidence (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.90) and mortality (hazard ratio of mortality = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.95) than nonmenthol cigarettes.
CONCLUSIONS - The findings suggest that menthol cigarettes are no more, and perhaps less, harmful than nonmenthol cigarettes.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Chronic illness and smoking cessation.
Patel K, Schlundt D, Larson C, Wang H, Brown A, Hargreaves M
(2009) Nicotine Tob Res 11: 933-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chronic Disease, Data Collection, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Smoking Cessation, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
INTRODUCTION - Smoking is among the leading causes of premature mortality and preventable death in the United States. Although smoking contributes to the probability of developing chronic illness, little is known about the relationship between quitting smoking and the presence of chronic illness. The present study investigated the association between diagnoses of one or more chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol) and smoking status (former or current smoker).
METHODS - The data analyzed were a subset of questions from a 155-item telephone-administered community survey that assessed smoking status, demographic characteristics, and presence of chronic disease. The study sample consisted of 3,802 randomly selected participants.
RESULTS - Participants with diabetes were more likely to report being former smokers, after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, whereas having hypertension or high cholesterol was not associated significantly with smoking status. The likelihood of being a former smoker did not increase as number of diagnosed chronic diseases increased. Participants who were women, older (aged 65+), or single were significantly less likely to be former smokers. Participants with at least a college degree, those with incomes of 50,000+ US dollars, and those who were underweight or obese were more likely to be former smokers.
DISCUSSION - These findings were inconsistent with research that has suggested that having a chronic illness or experiencing a serious medical event increases the odds of smoking cessation. Supporting prior research, we found that being male, having a higher income, and being obese were associated with greater likelihood of being a former smoker.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Best practice smoking cessation intervention and resource needs of prenatal care providers.
Hartmann KE, Wechter ME, Payne P, Salisbury K, Jackson RD, Melvin CL
(2007) Obstet Gynecol 110: 765-70
MeSH Terms: Benchmarking, Female, Guideline Adherence, Health Resources, Humans, Inservice Training, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Pregnancy, Prenatal Care, Smoking Cessation, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVE - To describe smoking cessation interventions by prenatal care providers and to identify factors associated with best practice.
METHODS - A mailed survey assessed implementation of the "5 A's" of best practice (Ask about smoking; Advise patients to quit; Assess willingness to quit; Assist with a cessation plan; and Arrange follow-up), practice characteristics, intervention training, resources, barriers, and attitudes toward reimbursement. Each factor in association with provider type and best practice implementation was analyzed.
RESULTS - Of 1,138 eligible North Carolina health professionals, 844 responded (74%); 549 were providing prenatal care and returned completed surveys. Most asked about smoking (98%) and advised cessation (100%). Across provider type, one third (31%) consistently implemented all "5 A's" of best practice. Most providers (90%) had at least one material resource (eg, pamphlets), which correlated with nearly 10 times the adjusted odds of best practice (odds ratio [OR] 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-72.9). Seventy percent had at least one counseling resource. Having a counseling resource (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4) and a written protocol to identify staff responsibilities (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.3) were equally associated with best practice. More than one half of providers endorsed reimbursement as influential on best practice.
CONCLUSION - Best practice is well-established to promote prenatal smoking cessation yet implemented by only one third of prenatal care providers in North Carolina. In this study, best practice was associated with resources, practice organization, and reimbursement. Augmented use of available resources (eg, toll-free hotlines) and adequate reimbursement may promote best practice implementation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
The association of cigarette smoking with self-reported disease before middle age: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.
Hozawa A, Houston T, Steffes MW, Widome R, Williams OD, Iribarren C, Pletcher MJ, Daviglus ML, Carr JJ, Jacobs DR
(2006) Prev Med 42: 193-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Cardiovascular Diseases, Chronic Disease, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Neoplasms, Peptic Ulcer, Proportional Hazards Models, Respiratory Tract Diseases, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Time Factors, Tobacco Smoke Pollution, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2014
BACKGROUND - Evidence that demonstrates the harmful effect of cigarette smoking during young adulthood is limited. Therefore, we assessed associations between cigarette smoking and several self-reported illnesses in a prospective cohort study in healthy young adults.
METHODS - Data were derived from 4472 adults aged 18 to 30 years at baseline participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study and reexamined at least once after 7, 10, or 15 years.
RESULTS - Cigarette smoking in 1985-86 was related to self-reported smoking-related cancers, circulatory disease, and peptic ulcer. Incidence of these diseases was 9.3/1000 person years among current smokers vs. 4.5/1000 person years among never smokers with no exposure to passive smoke, relative risk (adjusted for race, sex, education, and center) 1.96 (1.42-2.70). Assuming causal relationships, 32% of these premature incidents were attributable to smoking. The relative risks of liver disease, migraine headache, depression, being ill the day before the examination, and chronic cough and phlegm production were also higher in smokers.
CONCLUSIONS - Smokers aged 18-30 followed for 7 to 15 years reported an excess of both major and minor ailments related to earlier and current smoking. Thus, prevention, cessation, and avoiding passive smoking should remain strong goals among young people.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms