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In silico evaluation of DNA Damage Inducible Transcript 4 gene (DDIT4) as prognostic biomarker in several malignancies.
Pinto JA, Rolfo C, Raez LE, Prado A, Araujo JM, Bravo L, Fajardo W, Morante ZD, Aguilar A, Neciosup SP, Mas LA, Bretel D, Balko JM, Gomez HL
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 1526
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Computer Simulation, DNA Damage, Databases as Topic, Humans, Neoplasms, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Prognosis, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus, Survival Analysis, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Transcription Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
DDIT4 gene encodes a protein whose main action is to inhibit mTOR under stress conditions whilst several in vitro studies indicate that its expression favors cancer progression. We have previously described that DDIT4 expression is an independent prognostic factor for tripe negative breast cancer resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We herein report that high DDIT4 expression is related to the outcome (recurrence-free survival, time to progression and overall survival) in several cancer types. We performed in silico analysis in online platforms, in pooled datasets from KM Plotter and meta-analysis of individual datasets from SurvExpress. High levels of DDIT4 were significantly associated with a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia, breast cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, colon, skin and lung cancer. Conversely, a high DDIT4 expression was associated with an improved prognostic in gastric cancer. DDIT4 was not associated with the outcome of ovarian cancers. Analysis with data from the Cell Miner Tool in 60 cancer cell lines indicated that although rapamycin activity was correlated with levels of MTOR, it is not influenced by DDIT4 expression. In summary, DDIT4 might serve as a novel prognostic biomarker in several malignancies. DDIT4 activity could be responsible for resistance to mTOR inhibitors and is a potential candidate for the development of targeted therapy.
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14 MeSH Terms
ER trapping reveals Golgi enzymes continually revisit the ER through a recycling pathway that controls Golgi organization.
Sengupta P, Satpute-Krishnan P, Seo AY, Burnette DT, Patterson GH, Lippincott-Schwartz J
(2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112: E6752-61
MeSH Terms: Animals, COS Cells, Cercopithecus aethiops, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Golgi Apparatus, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mitosis, Phospholipases A2, Calcium-Independent, Sirolimus, Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A, Tacrolimus Binding Proteins, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added August 25, 2017
Whether Golgi enzymes remain localized within the Golgi or constitutively cycle through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is unclear, yet is important for understanding Golgi dependence on the ER. Here, we demonstrate that the previously reported inefficient ER trapping of Golgi enzymes in a rapamycin-based assay results from an artifact involving an endogenous ER-localized 13-kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP13) competing with the FKBP12-tagged Golgi enzyme for binding to an FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB)-tagged ER trap. When we express an FKBP12-tagged ER trap and FRB-tagged Golgi enzymes, conditions precluding such competition, the Golgi enzymes completely redistribute to the ER upon rapamycin treatment. A photoactivatable FRB-Golgi enzyme, highlighted only in the Golgi, likewise redistributes to the ER. These data establish Golgi enzymes constitutively cycle through the ER. Using our trapping scheme, we identify roles of rab6a and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) in Golgi enzyme recycling, and show that retrograde transport of Golgi membrane underlies Golgi dispersal during microtubule depolymerization and mitosis.
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13 MeSH Terms
Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.
Arriola Apelo SI, Neuman JC, Baar EL, Syed FA, Cummings NE, Brar HK, Pumper CP, Kimple ME, Lamming DW
(2016) Aging Cell 15: 28-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Proliferation, Glucose Intolerance, Homeostasis, Immune System, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus
Show Abstract · Added August 2, 2016
Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs.
© 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Unleashing rapamycin in fibrosis.
Hillel AT, Gelbard A
(2015) Oncotarget 6: 15722-3
MeSH Terms: Fibrosis, Humans, Sirolimus
Added January 25, 2017
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3 MeSH Terms
Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling determines kidney size.
Chen JK, Nagai K, Chen J, Plieth D, Hino M, Xu J, Sha F, Ikizler TA, Quarles CC, Threadgill DW, Neilson EG, Harris RC
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 2429-44
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27, Immunosuppressive Agents, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mice, Knockout, Multiprotein Complexes, Organ Size, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphorylation, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 90-kDa, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2015
Kidney size adaptively increases as mammals grow and in response to the loss of 1 kidney. It is not clear how kidneys size themselves or if the processes that adapt kidney mass to lean body mass also mediate renal hypertrophy following unilateral nephrectomy (UNX). Here, we demonstrated that mice harboring a proximal tubule-specific deletion of Pten (Pten(ptKO)) have greatly enlarged kidneys as the result of persistent activation of the class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT pathway and an increase of the antiproliferative signals p21(Cip1/WAF) and p27(Kip1). Administration of rapamycin to Pten(ptKO) mice diminished hypertrophy. Proximal tubule-specific deletion of Egfr in Pten(ptKO) mice also attenuated class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT signaling and reduced the size of enlarged kidneys. In Pten(ptKO) mice, UNX further increased mTORC1 activation and hypertrophy in the remaining kidney; however, mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation did not increase further in the remaining kidney of Pten(ptKO) mice, nor was it induced in the remaining kidney of WT mice. After UNX, renal blood flow and amino acid delivery to the remaining kidney rose abruptly, followed by increased amino acid content and activation of a class III PI3K/mTORC1/S6K1 pathway. Thus, our findings demonstrate context-dependent roles for EGFR-modulated class I PI3K/mTORC2/AKT signaling in the normal adaptation of kidney size and PTEN-independent, nutrient-dependent class III PI3K/mTORC1/S6K1 signaling in the compensatory enlargement of the remaining kidney following UNX.
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19 MeSH Terms
An unusual cause of respiratory failure in a 25-year-old heart and lung transplant recipient.
Narotzky S, Kennedy CC, Maldonado F
(2015) Chest 147: e185-e188
MeSH Terms: Adult, Female, Heart-Lung Transplantation, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Postoperative Complications, Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis, Respiratory Insufficiency, Sirolimus
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
A 25-year-old woman, a never smoker with a history of heart-lung transplantation for World Health Organization group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension performed 20 months prior to presentation, was evaluated for shortness of breath. Following transplantation, she was initiated on standard therapy of prednisone, tacrolimus, and azathioprine, along with routine antimicrobial prophylaxis. Her posttransplant course was complicated by persistent acute cellular rejection, as determined from a transbronchial biopsy specimen, without evidence of rejection in an endomyocardial biopsy specimen. The immunosuppressive medications were supplemented with pulse-dosed steroids, and the patient was transitioned from azathioprine to mycophenolate mofetil. Sirolimus was added 9 months prior to presentation. Three months prior to presentation, she was admitted for increasing oxygen requirements, shortness of breath, and bilateral infiltrates on the CT scans of the chest.
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9 MeSH Terms
mTOR inhibitors induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells via CHOP-dependent DR5 induction on 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation.
He K, Zheng X, Li M, Zhang L, Yu J
(2016) Oncogene 35: 148-57
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Tumor, Colonic Neoplasms, Everolimus, Female, Humans, Mice, Nude, Phosphoproteins, Phosphorylation, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, Sirolimus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Transcription Factor CHOP, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is commonly activated in colon cancer. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major downstream target of the PI3K/ATK pathway and activates protein synthesis by phosphorylating key regulators of messenger RNA translation and ribosome synthesis. Rapamycin analogs Everolimus and Temsirolimus are non-ATP-competitive mTORC1 inhibitors, and suppress proliferation and tumor angiogenesis and invasion. We now show that apoptosis plays a key role in their anti-tumor activities in colon cancer cells and xenografts through the DR5, FADD and caspase-8 axis, and is strongly enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and 5-fluorouracil. The induction of DR5 by rapalogs is mediated by the ER stress regulator and transcription factor CHOP, but not the tumor suppressor p53, on rapid and sustained inhibition of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and attenuated by eIF4E expression. ATP-competitive mTOR/PI3K inhibitors also promote DR5 induction and FADD-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells. These results establish activation of ER stress and the death receptor pathway as a novel anticancer mechanism of mTOR inhibitors.
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18 MeSH Terms
FDG-PET as a predictive biomarker for therapy with everolimus in metastatic renal cell cancer.
Chen JL, Appelbaum DE, Kocherginsky M, Cowey CL, Rathmell WK, McDermott DF, Stadler WM
(2013) Cancer Med 2: 545-52
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Everolimus, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Metastasis, Positron-Emission Tomography, Sirolimus, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, everolimus, affects tumor growth by targeting cellular metabolic proliferation pathways and delays renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression. Preclinical evidence suggests that baseline elevated tumor glucose metabolism as quantified by FDG-PET ([(18)F] fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography) may predict antitumor activity. Metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients refractory to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibition were treated with standard dose everolimus. FDG-PET scans were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks; serial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained at baseline and every 8 weeks. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the most FDG avid lesion, average SUVmax of all measured lesions and their corresponding 2-week relative changes were examined for association with 8-week change in tumor size. A total of 63 patients were enrolled; 50 were evaluable for the primary endpoint of which 48 had both PET scans. Patient characteristics included the following: 36 (72%) clear cell histology and median age 59 (range: 37-80). Median pre- and 2-week treatment average SUVmax were 6.6 (1-17.9) and 4.2 (1-13.9), respectively. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-based measurements demonstrated an average change in tumor burden of 0.2% (-32.7% to 35.9%) at 8 weeks. Relative change in average SUVmax was the best predictor of change in tumor burden (all evaluable P = 0.01; clear cell subtype P = 0.02), with modest correlation. Baseline average SUVmax was correlated with overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.023; 0.020), but not with change in tumor burden. Everolimus therapy decreased SUVs on follow-up PET scans in mRCC patients, but changes were only modestly correlated with changes in tumor size. Thus, clinical use of FDG-PET-based biomarkers is challenged by high variability.
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17 MeSH Terms
Improvement in insulin sensitivity after human islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes.
Rickels MR, Kong SM, Fuller C, Dalton-Bakes C, Ferguson JF, Reilly MP, Teff KL, Naji A
(2013) J Clin Endocrinol Metab 98: E1780-5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Graft Rejection, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Sirolimus, Tacrolimus
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
CONTEXT - Islet transplantation can improve metabolic control for type 1 diabetes (T1D), an effect anticipated to improve insulin sensitivity. However, current immunosuppression regimens containing tacrolimus and sirolimus have been shown to induce insulin resistance in rodents.
OBJECTIVE - The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of islet transplantation on insulin sensitivity in T1D using euglycemic clamps with the isotopic dilution method to distinguish between effects at the liver and skeletal muscle.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - Twelve T1D subjects underwent evaluation in the Clinical and Translational Research Center before and between 6 and 7 months after the transplant and were compared with normal control subjects.
INTERVENTION - The intervention included intrahepatic islet transplantation according to a Clinical Islet Transplantation Consortium protocol under low-dose tacrolimus and sirolimus immunosuppression.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - Total body (M/Δinsulin), hepatic (1/endogenous glucose production ·basal insulin) and peripheral [(Rd - endogenous glucose production)/Δinsulin] insulin sensitivity assessed by hyperinsulinemic (1 mU·kg(-1)·min(-1)) euglycemic (∼90 mg/dL) clamps with 6,6-(2)H2-glucose tracer infusion were measured.
RESULTS - Glycosylated hemoglobin was reduced in the transplant recipients from 7.0% ± 0.3% to 5.6% ± 0.1% (P < .01). There were increases in total (0.11 ± 0.01 to 0.15 ± 0.02 dL/min·kg per microunit per milliliter), hepatic [2.3 ± 0.1 to 3.7 ± 0.4 × 10(2) ([milligrams per kilogram per minute](-1)·(microunits per milliliter)(-1))], and peripheral (0.08 ± 0.01 to 0.12 ± 0.02 dL/min·kg per microunit per milliliter) insulin sensitivity from before to after transplantation (P < .05 for all). All insulin sensitivity measures were less than normal in T1D before (P ≤ .05) and not different from normal after transplantation.
CONCLUSIONS - Islet transplantation results in improved insulin sensitivity mediated by effects at both the liver and skeletal muscle. Modern dosing of glucocorticoid-free immunosuppression with low-dose tacrolimus and sirolimus does not induce insulin resistance in this population.
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17 MeSH Terms
Role of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin in the treatment of luminal breast cancer.
Ciruelos E, Cortes-Funes H, Ghanem I, Manso L, Arteaga C
(2013) Anticancer Drugs 24: 769-80
MeSH Terms: Androstadienes, Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Aromatase Inhibitors, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, Disease-Free Survival, Everolimus, Female, Humans, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Approximately 75% of patients with breast cancer present hormone receptor-positive tumors. This subtype of breast cancer initially shows a high overall response rate to hormonal treatments. However, resistance eventually develops, resulting in tumor progression. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates several cellular functions in cancer such as cell growth, survival, and proliferation. In addition, a high activation level of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is related to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and hormone therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus, in combination with hormonal treatments, has led to excellent results in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to hormone therapies. Therefore, everolimus has entered the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines 2012 and its combination with exemestane was approved recently by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. This is the first time that a drug will have been approved for the restoration of hormone sensitivity in breast cancer.
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16 MeSH Terms