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Deformation correction for image guided liver surgery: An intraoperative fidelity assessment.
Clements LW, Collins JA, Weis JA, Simpson AL, Kingham TP, Jarnagin WR, Miga MI
(2017) Surgery 162: 537-547
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatectomy, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Liver, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Intraoperative, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Single-Blind Method, Statistics, Nonparametric, Surgery, Computer-Assisted, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
BACKGROUND - Although systems of 3-dimensional image-guided surgery are a valuable adjunct across numerous procedures, differences in organ shape between that reflected in the preoperative image data and the intraoperative state can compromise the fidelity of such guidance based on the image. In this work, we assessed in real time a novel, 3-dimensional image-guided operation platform that incorporates soft tissue deformation.
METHODS - A series of 125 alignment evaluations were performed across 20 patients. During the operation, the surgeon assessed the liver by swabbing an optically tracked stylus over the liver surface and viewing the image-guided operation display. Each patient had approximately 6 intraoperative comparative evaluations. For each assessment, 1 of only 2 types of alignments were considered: conventional rigid and novel deformable. The series of alignment types used was randomized and blinded to the surgeon. The surgeon provided a rating, R, from -3 to +3 for each display compared with the previous display, whereby a negative rating indicated degradation in fidelity and a positive rating an improvement.
RESULTS - A statistical analysis of the series of rating data by the clinician indicated that the surgeons were able to perceive an improvement (defined as a R > 1) of the model-based registration over the rigid registration (P = .01) as well as a degradation (defined as R < -1) when the rigid registration was compared with the novel deformable guidance information (P = .03).
CONCLUSION - This study provides evidence of the benefit of deformation correction in providing an accurate location for the liver for use in image-guided surgery systems.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Metabolic responses to exogenous ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in humans.
Tamboli RA, Antoun J, Sidani RM, Clements A, Harmata EE, Marks-Shulman P, Gaylinn BD, Williams B, Clements RH, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2017) Diabetes Obes Metab 19: 1267-1275
MeSH Terms: Acylation, Anti-Obesity Agents, Cohort Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Cross-Over Studies, Energy Metabolism, Gastric Bypass, Ghrelin, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose Clamp Technique, Human Growth Hormone, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Morbid, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Pancreatic Polypeptide-Secreting Cells, Pituitary Gland, Anterior, Postoperative Care, Preoperative Care, Protein Precursors, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2017
AIMS - Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and has a multi-faceted role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, including glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin concentrations are modulated in response to nutritional status, but responses to ghrelin in altered metabolic states are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic effects of ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We assessed central and peripheral metabolic responses to acyl ghrelin infusion (1 pmol kg  min ) in healthy, lean subjects (n = 9) and non-diabetic, obese subjects (n = 9) before and 2 weeks after RYGB. Central responses were assessed by GH and pancreatic polypeptide (surrogate for vagal activity) secretion. Peripheral responses were assessed by hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp.
RESULTS - Ghrelin-stimulated GH secretion was attenuated in obese subjects, but was restored by RYGB to a response similar to that of lean subjects. The heightened pancreatic polypeptide response to ghrelin infusion in the obese was attenuated after RYGB. Hepatic glucose production and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not altered by ghrelin infusion in RYGB subjects. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was impaired to a similar degree in lean, obese and post-RYGB individuals in response to ghrelin infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that obesity is characterized by abnormal central, but not peripheral, responsiveness to ghrelin that can be restored early after RYGB before significant weight loss. Further work is necessary to fully elucidate the role of ghrelin in the metabolic changes that occur in obesity and following RYGB.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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24 MeSH Terms
Randomized controlled trial comparing esophageal dilation to no dilation among adults with esophageal eosinophilia and dysphagia.
Kavitt RT, Ates F, Slaughter JC, Higginbotham T, Shepherd BD, Sumner EL, Vaezi MF
(2016) Dis Esophagus 29: 983-991
MeSH Terms: Adult, Deglutition Disorders, Dexlansoprazole, Dilatation, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Esophageal Stenosis, Esophagoplasty, Esophagoscopy, Esophagus, Female, Fluticasone, Glucocorticoids, Humans, Male, Proton Pump Inhibitors, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
The role of esophageal dilation in patients with esophageal eosinophilia with dysphagia remains unknown. The practice of dilation is currently based on center preferences and expert opinion. The aim of this study is to determine if, and to what extent, dysphagia improves in response to initial esophageal dilation followed by standard medical therapies. We conducted a randomized, blinded, controlled trial evaluating adult patients with dysphagia and newly diagnosed esophageal eosinophilia from 2008 to 2013. Patients were randomized to dilation or no dilation at time of endoscopy and blinded to dilation status. Endoscopic features were graded as major and minor. Subsequent to randomization and endoscopy, all patients received fluticasone and dexlansoprazole for 2 months. The primary study outcome was reduction in overall dysphagia score, assessed at 30 and 60 days post-intervention. Patients with severe strictures (less than 7-mm esophageal diameter) were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients were randomized and completed the protocol: 17 randomized to dilation and 14 to no dilation. Both groups were similar with regard to gender, age, eosinophil density, endoscopic score, and baseline dysphagia score. The population exhibited moderate to severe dysphagia and moderate esophageal stricturing at baseline. Overall, there was a significant (P < 0.001) but similar reduction in mean dysphagia score at 30 and 60 days post-randomization compared with baseline in both groups. No significant difference in dysphagia scores between treatment groups after 30 (P = 0.93) or 60 (P = 0.21) days post-intervention was observed. Esophageal dilation did not result in additional improvement in dysphagia score compared with treatment with proton pump inhibitor and fluticasone alone. In patients with symptomatic esophageal eosinophilia without severe stricture, dilation does not appear to be a necessary initial treatment strategy.
© 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.
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18 MeSH Terms
Noninvasive Computed Tomography-based Risk Stratification of Lung Adenocarcinomas in the National Lung Screening Trial.
Maldonado F, Duan F, Raghunath SM, Rajagopalan S, Karwoski RA, Garg K, Greco E, Nath H, Robb RA, Bartholmai BJ, Peikert T
(2015) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 192: 737-44
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Clinical Decision-Making, Decision Support Techniques, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Single-Blind Method, Survival Analysis, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
RATIONALE - Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (CT) reduces lung cancer mortality. However, in addition to a high rate of benign nodules, lung cancer screening detects a large number of indolent cancers that generally belong to the adenocarcinoma spectrum. Individualized management of screen-detected adenocarcinomas would be facilitated by noninvasive risk stratification.
OBJECTIVES - To validate that Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield (CANARY), a novel image analysis software, successfully risk stratifies screen-detected lung adenocarcinomas based on clinical disease outcomes.
METHODS - We identified retrospective 294 eligible patients diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma spectrum lesions in the low-dose CT arm of the National Lung Screening Trial. The last low-dose CT scan before the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma was analyzed using CANARY blinded to clinical data. Based on their parametric CANARY signatures, all the lung adenocarcinoma nodules were risk stratified into three groups. CANARY risk groups were compared using survival analysis for progression-free survival.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - A total of 294 patients were included in the analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis of all the 294 adenocarcinoma nodules stratified into the Good, Intermediate, and Poor CANARY risk groups yielded distinct progression-free survival curves (P < 0.0001). This observation was confirmed in the unadjusted and adjusted (age, sex, race, and smoking status) progression-free survival analysis of all stage I cases.
CONCLUSIONS - CANARY allows the noninvasive risk stratification of lung adenocarcinomas into three groups with distinct post-treatment progression-free survival. Our results suggest that CANARY could ultimately facilitate individualized management of incidentally or screen-detected lung adenocarcinomas.
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18 MeSH Terms
The Intensive Diet and Exercise for Arthritis (IDEA) trial: 18-month radiographic and MRI outcomes.
Hunter DJ, Beavers DP, Eckstein F, Guermazi A, Loeser RF, Nicklas BJ, Mihalko SL, Miller GD, Lyles M, DeVita P, Legault C, Carr JJ, Williamson JD, Messier SP
(2015) Osteoarthritis Cartilage 23: 1090-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Body Mass Index, Combined Modality Therapy, Diet, Reducing, Disease Progression, Exercise Therapy, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Radiography, Severity of Illness Index, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2015
PURPOSE - Report the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural outcomes of an 18-month study of diet-induced weight loss, with or without exercise, compared to exercise alone in older, overweight and obese adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA).
METHODS - Prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial that enrolled 454 overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI = 27-41 kg m(-2)) older (age ≥ 55 yrs) adults with knee pain and radiographic evidence of femorotibial OA. Participants were randomized to one of three 18-month interventions: diet-induced weight loss only (D); diet-induced weight loss plus exercise (D + E); or exercise-only control (E). X-rays (N = 325) and MRIs (N = 105) were acquired at baseline and 18 months follow-up. X-ray and MRI (cartilage thickness and semi-quantitative (SQ)) results were analyzed to compare change between groups at 18-month follow-up using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for baseline values, baseline BMI, and gender.
RESULTS - Mean baseline descriptive characteristics of the cohort included: age, 65.6 yrs; BMI 33.6 kg m(-2); 72% female; 81% white. There was no significant difference between groups in joint space width (JSW) loss; D -0.07 (SE 0.22) mm, D + E -0.27 (SE 0.22) mm and E -0.16 (SE 0.24) mm (P = 0.79). There was also no significant difference in MRI cartilage loss between groups; D -0.10(0.05) mm, D + E -0.13(0.04) mm and E -0.05(0.04) mm (P = 0.42).
CONCLUSION - Despite the potent effects of weight loss in this study on symptoms as well as mechanistic outcomes (such as joint compressive force and markers of inflammation), there was no statistically significant difference between the three active interventions on the rate of structural progression either on X-ray or MRI over 18-months.
Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia differ between glimepiride and glyburide in non diabetic individuals.
Joy NG, Tate DB, Davis SN
(2015) Metabolism 64: 729-37
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Glucose, C-Peptide, Female, Glucagon, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glyburide, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Leptin, Male, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Single-Blind Method, Sulfonylurea Compounds
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Reported rates of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are lower with glimepiride as compared to glyburide. The aim of this study was to determine whether physiologic differences in counterregulatory neuroendocrine and metabolic mechanisms during hypoglycemia provide a basis for the observed clinical differences between glimepiride and glyburide.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Non-diabetic volunteers (age 38±2years, BMI 26±1kg/m(2)) were studied in a single-blind fashion during separate 2day randomized protocols consisting of 2h hyperinsulinemic (9pmol/kg/min) euglycemic (4.9±0.1mmol) and hypoglycemic (2.9±0.1mmol/L) clamps. Individuals received biologically equivalent doses of glimepiride (4mg) or glyburide (10mg) 1h prior to each glucose clamp (n=11) as well as a control group of placebo studies. Glucose kinetics were calculated using D-Glucose-6-6d2.
RESULTS - Insulin and C-peptide levels were increased (p<0.05) during euglycemia in both sulfonylurea groups as compared to placebo. However, despite equivalent hypoglycemia, insulin and C-peptide levels were higher (p<0.05) only after glyburide. Glucagon responses and endogenous glucose production (EGP) were decreased (p<0.05) during hypoglycemia following glyburide administration as compared to glimepiride. Glyburide reduced (p<0.05) norepinephrine responses during euglycemic clamps. In addition combined epinephrine and norepinephrine responses during hypoglycemia were reduced (p<0.05) following glyburide as compared to placebo. Leptin levels fell by a greater amount (p<0.05) during hypoglycemia with both sulfonylureas as compared to placebo.
CONCLUSIONS - In summary, glimepiride and glyburide can both similarly increase insulin and C-peptide levels during hyperinsulinemic euglycemia. However, during moderate hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (2.9mmol/L) glyburide resulted in increased C-peptide and insulin, but blunted glucagon, sympathetic nervous system and EGP responses. We conclude that glyburide can acutely reduce key neuroendocrine and metabolic counterregulatory defenses during hypoglycemia in healthy individuals.
Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Chemotherapy-induced splenic volume increase is independently associated with major complications after hepatic resection for metastatic colorectal cancer.
Simpson AL, Leal JN, Pugalenthi A, Allen PJ, DeMatteo RP, Fong Y, Gönen M, Jarnagin WR, Kingham TP, Miga MI, Shia J, Weiser MR, D'Angelica MI
(2015) J Am Coll Surg 220: 271-80
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Case-Control Studies, Chemotherapy, Adjuvant, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatectomy, Humans, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Single-Blind Method, Splenomegaly, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
BACKGROUND - In patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM), chemotherapy-induced hepatic injury is associated with increased splenic volume, thrombocytopenia, and decreased long-term survival. The current study investigates the relationship between change in splenic volume after preoperative chemotherapy and development of postoperative complications.
STUDY DESIGN - The study group consisted of 80 patients who underwent resection of CRCLM; half received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months before resection (n = 40) and the other half did not (n = 40). The study group was compared with two control groups: a normal group composed of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for benign disease (n = 40) and a group of untreated, nonmetastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (n = 40). Splenic volume was measured by CT/MRI volumetry. In the study group, the nontumoral liver was graded for steatosis and sinusoidal injury; operative and outcomes characteristics were also analyzed.
RESULTS - Before chemotherapy, CRCLM patients had normalized spleen volumes of 3.2 ± 1.1 mL/kg, significantly higher than normal (2.5 ± 0.8 mL/kg; p < 0.001) and nonmetastatic CRC (2.6 ± 1.3 mL/kg; p < 0.05) patients, with higher splenic volume after 6 months of chemotherapy (4.2 ± 1.7 mL/kg; p < 0.01). After chemotherapy, splenic volume increase was associated with any perioperative complication (p < 0.01) and major complications (p < 0.05). Patients with ≥39% splenic volume increase (maximal chi-square test) were significantly more likely to have major complications (p < 0.01). Spleen volume changes were not correlated with change in platelet count (R(2) = 0.03; p = 0.301).
CONCLUSIONS - In patients with CRCLM, the presence of liver metastases and chemotherapy are associated with higher splenic volume. Percent splenic volume increase after 6 months of chemotherapy can aid preoperative risk stratification, as it was an independent predictor of major postoperative complications.
Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Controlled trial of transfusions for silent cerebral infarcts in sickle cell anemia.
DeBaun MR, Gordon M, McKinstry RC, Noetzel MJ, White DA, Sarnaik SA, Meier ER, Howard TH, Majumdar S, Inusa BP, Telfer PT, Kirby-Allen M, McCavit TL, Kamdem A, Airewele G, Woods GM, Berman B, Panepinto JA, Fuh BR, Kwiatkowski JL, King AA, Fixler JM, Rhodes MM, Thompson AA, Heiny ME, Redding-Lallinger RC, Kirkham FJ, Dixon N, Gonzalez CE, Kalinyak KA, Quinn CT, Strouse JJ, Miller JP, Lehmann H, Kraut MA, Ball WS, Hirtz D, Casella JF
(2014) N Engl J Med 371: 699-710
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Blood Transfusion, Cerebral Infarction, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Ferritins, Hemoglobin, Sickle, Humans, Intelligence, Intention to Treat Analysis, Male, Secondary Prevention, Single-Blind Method, Transfusion Reaction
Show Abstract · Added October 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - Silent cerebral infarcts are the most common neurologic injury in children with sickle cell anemia and are associated with the recurrence of an infarct (stroke or silent cerebral infarct). We tested the hypothesis that the incidence of the recurrence of an infarct would be lower among children who underwent regular blood-transfusion therapy than among those who received standard care.
METHODS - In this randomized, single-blind clinical trial, we randomly assigned children with sickle cell anemia to receive regular blood transfusions (transfusion group) or standard care (observation group). Participants were between 5 and 15 years of age, with no history of stroke and with one or more silent cerebral infarcts on magnetic resonance imaging and a neurologic examination showing no abnormalities corresponding to these lesions. The primary end point was the recurrence of an infarct, defined as a stroke or a new or enlarged silent cerebral infarct.
RESULTS - A total of 196 children (mean age, 10 years) were randomly assigned to the observation or transfusion group and were followed for a median of 3 years. In the transfusion group, 6 of 99 children (6%) had an end-point event (1 had a stroke, and 5 had new or enlarged silent cerebral infarcts). In the observation group, 14 of 97 children (14%) had an end-point event (7 had strokes, and 7 had new or enlarged silent cerebral infarcts). The incidence of the primary end point in the transfusion and observation groups was 2.0 and 4.8 events, respectively, per 100 years at risk, corresponding to an incidence rate ratio of 0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.12 to 0.99; P=0.04).
CONCLUSIONS - Regular blood-transfusion therapy significantly reduced the incidence of the recurrence of cerebral infarct in children with sickle cell anemia. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; Silent Cerebral Infarct Multi-Center Clinical Trial ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00072761, and Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN52713285.).
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Do fish oil omega-3 fatty acids enhance antioxidant capacity and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in human atrial myocardium via PPARγ activation?
Anderson EJ, Thayne KA, Harris M, Shaikh SR, Darden TM, Lark DS, Williams JM, Chitwood WR, Kypson AP, Rodriguez E
(2014) Antioxid Redox Signal 21: 1156-63
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antioxidants, Fatty Acids, Omega-3, Female, Gene Expression, Heart Atria, Heart Diseases, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mitochondria, Heart, Myocardium, Oxidation-Reduction, PPAR gamma, Prospective Studies, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added January 23, 2015
Abstract Studies in experimental models suggest that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) improve metabolic and anti-inflammatory/antioxidant capacity of the heart, although the mechanisms are unclear and translational evidence is lacking. In this study, patients ingested a moderately high dose of n-3 PUFAs (3.4 g/day eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and doxosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ethyl-esters) for a period of 2-3 weeks before having elective cardiac surgery. Blood was obtained before treatment and at the time of surgery, and myocardial tissue from the right atrium was also dissected during surgery. Blood EPA levels increased and myocardial tissue EPA and DHA levels were significantly higher in n-3 PUFA-treated patients compared with untreated, standard-of-care control patients. Interestingly, n-3 PUFA patients had greater nuclear transactivation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), fatty acid metabolic gene expression, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration supported by palmitoyl-carnitine in the atrial myocardium, despite no difference in mitochondrial content. Myocardial tissue from n-3 PUFA patients also displayed greater expression and activity of key antioxidant/anti-inflammatory enzymes. These findings lead to our hypothesis that PPARγ activation is a mechanism by which fish oil n-3 PUFAs enhance mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant capacity in human atrial myocardium, and that this preoperative therapeutic regimen may be optimal for mitigating oxidative/inflammatory stress associated with cardiac surgery.
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Effects of intensive diet and exercise on knee joint loads, inflammation, and clinical outcomes among overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis: the IDEA randomized clinical trial.
Messier SP, Mihalko SL, Legault C, Miller GD, Nicklas BJ, DeVita P, Beavers DP, Hunter DJ, Lyles MF, Eckstein F, Williamson JD, Carr JJ, Guermazi A, Loeser RF
(2013) JAMA 310: 1263-73
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biomarkers, Biomechanical Phenomena, Body Mass Index, Diet, Reducing, Exercise Therapy, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-6, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Overweight, Pain Measurement, Quality of Life, Self Report, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome, Weight Loss, Weight-Bearing
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
IMPORTANCE - Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a common cause of chronic pain and disability, has biomechanical and inflammatory origins and is exacerbated by obesity.
OBJECTIVE - To determine whether a ≥10% reduction in body weight induced by diet, with or without exercise, would improve mechanistic and clinical outcomes more than exercise alone.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - Single-blind, 18-month, randomized clinical trial at Wake Forest University between July 2006 and April 2011. The diet and exercise interventions were center-based with options for the exercise groups to transition to a home-based program. Participants were 454 overweight and obese older community-dwelling adults (age ≥55 years with body mass index of 27-41) with pain and radiographic knee OA.
INTERVENTIONS - Intensive diet-induced weight loss plus exercise, intensive diet-induced weight loss, or exercise.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES - Mechanistic primary outcomes: knee joint compressive force and plasma IL-6 levels; secondary clinical outcomes: self-reported pain (range, 0-20), function (range, 0-68), mobility, and health-related quality of life (range, 0-100).
RESULTS - Three hundred ninety-nine participants (88%) completed the study. Mean weight loss for diet + exercise participants was 10.6 kg (11.4%); for the diet group, 8.9 kg (9.5%); and for the exercise group, 1.8 kg (2.0%). After 18 months, knee compressive forces were lower in diet participants (mean, 2487 N; 95% CI, 2393 to 2581) compared with exercise participants (2687 N; 95% CI, 2590 to 2784, pairwise difference [Δ](exercise vs diet )= 200 N; 95% CI, 55 to 345; P = .007). Concentrations of IL-6 were lower in diet + exercise (2.7 pg/mL; 95% CI, 2.5 to 3.0) and diet participants (2.7 pg/mL; 95% CI, 2.4 to 3.0) compared with exercise participants (3.1 pg/mL; 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.4; Δ(exercise vs diet + exercise) = 0.39 pg/mL; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.81; P = .007; Δ(exercise vs diet )= 0.43 pg/mL; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.85, P = .006). The diet + exercise group had less pain (3.6; 95% CI, 3.2 to 4.1) and better function (14.1; 95% CI, 12.6 to 15.6) than both the diet group (4.8; 95% CI, 4.3 to 5.2) and exercise group (4.7; 95% CI, 4.2 to 5.1, Δ(exercise vs diet + exercise) = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.33 to 1.71; P(pain) = .004; 18.4; 95% CI, 16.9 to 19.9; Δ(exercise vs diet + exercise), 4.29; 95% CI, 2.07 to 6.50; P(function )< .001). The diet + exercise group (44.7; 95% CI, 43.4 to 46.0) also had better physical health-related quality of life scores than the exercise group (41.9; 95% CI, 40.5 to 43.2; Δ(exercise vs diet + exercise) = -2.81; 95% CI, -4.76 to -0.86; P = .005).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE - Among overweight and obese adults with knee OA, after 18 months, participants in the diet + exercise and diet groups had more weight loss and greater reductions in IL-6 levels than those in the exercise group; those in the diet group had greater reductions in knee compressive force than those in the exercise group.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00381290.
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