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PDA-TOLERATE Trial: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment of Moderate-to-Large Patent Ductus Arteriosus at 1 Week of Age.
Clyman RI, Liebowitz M, Kaempf J, Erdeve O, Bulbul A, Håkansson S, Lindqvist J, Farooqi A, Katheria A, Sauberan J, Singh J, Nelson K, Wickremasinghe A, Dong L, Hassinger DC, Aucott SW, Hayashi M, Heuchan AM, Carey WA, Derrick M, Fernandez E, Sankar M, Leone T, Perez J, Serize A, PDA-TOLERATE (PDA: TO LEave it alone or Respond And Treat Early) Trial Investigators
(2019) J Pediatr 205: 41-48.e6
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Conservative Treatment, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Ibuprofen, Indomethacin, Infant, Extremely Premature, Infant, Newborn, Male, Prospective Studies, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 23, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To compare early routine pharmacologic treatment of moderate-to-large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) at the end of week 1 with a conservative approach that requires prespecified respiratory and hemodynamic criteria before treatment can be given.
STUDY DESIGN - A total of 202 neonates of <28 weeks of gestation age (mean, 25.8 ± 1.1 weeks) with moderate-to-large PDA shunts were enrolled between age 6 and 14 days (mean, 8.1 ± 2.2 days) into an exploratory randomized controlled trial.
RESULTS - At enrollment, 49% of the patients were intubated and 48% required nasal ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure. There were no differences between the groups in either our primary outcome of ligation or presence of a PDA at discharge (early routine treatment [ERT], 32%; conservative treatment [CT], 39%) or any of our prespecified secondary outcomes of necrotizing enterocolitis (ERT, 16%; CT, 19%), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (ERT, 49%; CT, 53%), BPD/death (ERT, 58%; CT, 57%), death (ERT,19%; CT, 10%), and weekly need for respiratory support. Fewer infants in the ERT group met the rescue criteria (ERT, 31%; CT, 62%). In secondary exploratory analyses, infants receiving ERT had significantly less need for inotropic support (ERT, 13%; CT, 25%). However, among infants who were ≥26 weeks gestational age, those receiving ERT took significantly longer to achieve enteral feeding of 120 mL/kg/day (median: ERT, 14 days [range, 4.5-19 days]; CT, 6 days [range, 3-14 days]), and had significantly higher incidences of late-onset non-coagulase-negative Staphylococcus bacteremia (ERT, 24%; CT,6%) and death (ERT, 16%; CT, 2%).
CONCLUSIONS - In preterm infants age <28 weeks with moderate-to-large PDAs who were receiving respiratory support after the first week, ERT did not reduce PDA ligations or the presence of a PDA at discharge and did not improve any of the prespecified secondary outcomes, but delayed full feeding and was associated with higher rates of late-onset sepsis and death in infants born at ≥26 weeks of gestation.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01958320.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
The Quality of Response Time Data Inference: A Blinded, Collaborative Assessment of the Validity of Cognitive Models.
Dutilh G, Annis J, Brown SD, Cassey P, Evans NJ, Grasman RPPP, Hawkins GE, Heathcote A, Holmes WR, Krypotos AM, Kupitz CN, Leite FP, Lerche V, Lin YS, Logan GD, Palmeri TJ, Starns JJ, Trueblood JS, van Maanen L, van Ravenzwaaij D, Vandekerckhove J, Visser I, Voss A, White CN, Wiecki TV, Rieskamp J, Donkin C
(2019) Psychon Bull Rev 26: 1051-1069
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cognition, Female, Humans, Male, Models, Psychological, Models, Statistical, Reaction Time, Reproducibility of Results, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Most data analyses rely on models. To complement statistical models, psychologists have developed cognitive models, which translate observed variables into psychologically interesting constructs. Response time models, in particular, assume that response time and accuracy are the observed expression of latent variables including 1) ease of processing, 2) response caution, 3) response bias, and 4) non-decision time. Inferences about these psychological factors, hinge upon the validity of the models' parameters. Here, we use a blinded, collaborative approach to assess the validity of such model-based inferences. Seventeen teams of researchers analyzed the same 14 data sets. In each of these two-condition data sets, we manipulated properties of participants' behavior in a two-alternative forced choice task. The contributing teams were blind to the manipulations, and had to infer what aspect of behavior was changed using their method of choice. The contributors chose to employ a variety of models, estimation methods, and inference procedures. Our results show that, although conclusions were similar across different methods, these "modeler's degrees of freedom" did affect their inferences. Interestingly, many of the simpler approaches yielded as robust and accurate inferences as the more complex methods. We recommend that, in general, cognitive models become a typical analysis tool for response time data. In particular, we argue that the simpler models and procedures are sufficient for standard experimental designs. We finish by outlining situations in which more complicated models and methods may be necessary, and discuss potential pitfalls when interpreting the output from response time models.
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10 MeSH Terms
Intracranial vasculopathy and infarct recurrence in children with sickle cell anaemia, silent cerebral infarcts and normal transcranial Doppler velocities.
Choudhury NA, DeBaun MR, Ponisio MR, Jordan LC, Rodeghier M, Pruthi S, McKinstry RC
(2018) Br J Haematol 183: 324-326
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Blood Flow Velocity, Blood Transfusion, Brain, Cerebral Infarction, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Angiography, Male, Recurrence, Single-Blind Method, Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Added March 24, 2020
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Deformation correction for image guided liver surgery: An intraoperative fidelity assessment.
Clements LW, Collins JA, Weis JA, Simpson AL, Kingham TP, Jarnagin WR, Miga MI
(2017) Surgery 162: 537-547
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatectomy, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Liver, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Intraoperative, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Single-Blind Method, Statistics, Nonparametric, Surgery, Computer-Assisted, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
BACKGROUND - Although systems of 3-dimensional image-guided surgery are a valuable adjunct across numerous procedures, differences in organ shape between that reflected in the preoperative image data and the intraoperative state can compromise the fidelity of such guidance based on the image. In this work, we assessed in real time a novel, 3-dimensional image-guided operation platform that incorporates soft tissue deformation.
METHODS - A series of 125 alignment evaluations were performed across 20 patients. During the operation, the surgeon assessed the liver by swabbing an optically tracked stylus over the liver surface and viewing the image-guided operation display. Each patient had approximately 6 intraoperative comparative evaluations. For each assessment, 1 of only 2 types of alignments were considered: conventional rigid and novel deformable. The series of alignment types used was randomized and blinded to the surgeon. The surgeon provided a rating, R, from -3 to +3 for each display compared with the previous display, whereby a negative rating indicated degradation in fidelity and a positive rating an improvement.
RESULTS - A statistical analysis of the series of rating data by the clinician indicated that the surgeons were able to perceive an improvement (defined as a R > 1) of the model-based registration over the rigid registration (P = .01) as well as a degradation (defined as R < -1) when the rigid registration was compared with the novel deformable guidance information (P = .03).
CONCLUSION - This study provides evidence of the benefit of deformation correction in providing an accurate location for the liver for use in image-guided surgery systems.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Efficacy of Flecainide in the Treatment of Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
Kannankeril PJ, Moore JP, Cerrone M, Priori SG, Kertesz NJ, Ro PS, Batra AS, Kaufman ES, Fairbrother DL, Saarel EV, Etheridge SP, Kanter RJ, Carboni MP, Dzurik MV, Fountain D, Chen H, Ely EW, Roden DM, Knollmann BC
(2017) JAMA Cardiol 2: 759-766
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adrenergic beta-Antagonists, Anti-Arrhythmia Agents, Cross-Over Studies, Death, Sudden, Cardiac, Defibrillators, Implantable, Drug Therapy, Combination, Exercise, Exercise Test, Female, Flecainide, Humans, Male, Maximum Tolerated Dose, Single-Blind Method, Tachycardia, Ventricular, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Importance - Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a potentially lethal genetic arrhythmia syndrome characterized by polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with physical or emotional stress, for which current therapy with β-blockers is incompletely effective. Flecainide acetate directly suppresses sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release-the cellular mechanism responsible for triggering ventricular arrhythmias in CPVT-but has never been assessed prospectively.
Objective - To determine whether flecainide dosed to therapeutic levels and added to β-blocker therapy is superior to β-blocker therapy alone for the prevention of exercise-induced arrhythmias in CPVT.
Design, Setting, and Participants - This investigator-initiated, multicenter, single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial was conducted from December 19, 2011, through December 29, 2015, with a midtrial protocol change at 10 US sites. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of CPVT and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator underwent a baseline exercise test while receiving maximally tolerated β-blocker therapy that was continued throughout the trial. Patients were then randomized to treatment A (flecainide or placebo) for 3 months, followed by exercise testing. After a 1-week washout period, patients crossed over to treatment B (placebo or flecainide) for 3 months, followed by exercise testing.
Interventions - Patients received oral flecainide or placebo twice daily, with the dosage guided by trough serum levels.
Main Outcomes and Measures - The primary end point of ventricular arrhythmias during exercise was compared between the flecainide and placebo arms. Exercise tests were scored on an ordinal scale of worst ventricular arrhythmia observed (0 indicates no ectopy; 1, isolated premature ventricular beats; 2, bigeminy; 3, couplets; and 4, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia).
Results - Of 14 patients (7 males and 7 females; median age, 16 years [interquartile range, 15.0-22.5 years]) randomized, 13 completed the study. The median baseline exercise test score was 3.0 (range, 0-4), with no difference noted between the baseline and placebo (median, 2.5; range, 0-4) exercise scores. The median ventricular arrhythmia score during exercise was significantly reduced by flecainide (0 [range, 0-2] vs 2.5 [range, 0-4] for placebo; P < .01), with complete suppression observed in 11 of 13 patients (85%). Overall and serious adverse events did not differ between the flecainide and placebo arms.
Conclusions and Relevance - In this randomized clinical trial of patients with CPVT, flecainide plus β-blocker significantly reduced ventricular ectopy during exercise compared with placebo plus β-blocker and β-blocker alone.
Trial Registration - clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01117454.
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Metabolic responses to exogenous ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in humans.
Tamboli RA, Antoun J, Sidani RM, Clements A, Harmata EE, Marks-Shulman P, Gaylinn BD, Williams B, Clements RH, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2017) Diabetes Obes Metab 19: 1267-1275
MeSH Terms: Acylation, Anti-Obesity Agents, Cohort Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Cross-Over Studies, Energy Metabolism, Gastric Bypass, Ghrelin, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose Clamp Technique, Human Growth Hormone, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Morbid, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Pancreatic Polypeptide-Secreting Cells, Pituitary Gland, Anterior, Postoperative Care, Preoperative Care, Protein Precursors, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2017
AIMS - Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and has a multi-faceted role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, including glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin concentrations are modulated in response to nutritional status, but responses to ghrelin in altered metabolic states are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic effects of ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We assessed central and peripheral metabolic responses to acyl ghrelin infusion (1 pmol kg  min ) in healthy, lean subjects (n = 9) and non-diabetic, obese subjects (n = 9) before and 2 weeks after RYGB. Central responses were assessed by GH and pancreatic polypeptide (surrogate for vagal activity) secretion. Peripheral responses were assessed by hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp.
RESULTS - Ghrelin-stimulated GH secretion was attenuated in obese subjects, but was restored by RYGB to a response similar to that of lean subjects. The heightened pancreatic polypeptide response to ghrelin infusion in the obese was attenuated after RYGB. Hepatic glucose production and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not altered by ghrelin infusion in RYGB subjects. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was impaired to a similar degree in lean, obese and post-RYGB individuals in response to ghrelin infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that obesity is characterized by abnormal central, but not peripheral, responsiveness to ghrelin that can be restored early after RYGB before significant weight loss. Further work is necessary to fully elucidate the role of ghrelin in the metabolic changes that occur in obesity and following RYGB.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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24 MeSH Terms
Randomized controlled trial comparing esophageal dilation to no dilation among adults with esophageal eosinophilia and dysphagia.
Kavitt RT, Ates F, Slaughter JC, Higginbotham T, Shepherd BD, Sumner EL, Vaezi MF
(2016) Dis Esophagus 29: 983-991
MeSH Terms: Adult, Deglutition Disorders, Dexlansoprazole, Dilatation, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Esophageal Stenosis, Esophagoplasty, Esophagoscopy, Esophagus, Female, Fluticasone, Glucocorticoids, Humans, Male, Proton Pump Inhibitors, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
The role of esophageal dilation in patients with esophageal eosinophilia with dysphagia remains unknown. The practice of dilation is currently based on center preferences and expert opinion. The aim of this study is to determine if, and to what extent, dysphagia improves in response to initial esophageal dilation followed by standard medical therapies. We conducted a randomized, blinded, controlled trial evaluating adult patients with dysphagia and newly diagnosed esophageal eosinophilia from 2008 to 2013. Patients were randomized to dilation or no dilation at time of endoscopy and blinded to dilation status. Endoscopic features were graded as major and minor. Subsequent to randomization and endoscopy, all patients received fluticasone and dexlansoprazole for 2 months. The primary study outcome was reduction in overall dysphagia score, assessed at 30 and 60 days post-intervention. Patients with severe strictures (less than 7-mm esophageal diameter) were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients were randomized and completed the protocol: 17 randomized to dilation and 14 to no dilation. Both groups were similar with regard to gender, age, eosinophil density, endoscopic score, and baseline dysphagia score. The population exhibited moderate to severe dysphagia and moderate esophageal stricturing at baseline. Overall, there was a significant (P < 0.001) but similar reduction in mean dysphagia score at 30 and 60 days post-randomization compared with baseline in both groups. No significant difference in dysphagia scores between treatment groups after 30 (P = 0.93) or 60 (P = 0.21) days post-intervention was observed. Esophageal dilation did not result in additional improvement in dysphagia score compared with treatment with proton pump inhibitor and fluticasone alone. In patients with symptomatic esophageal eosinophilia without severe stricture, dilation does not appear to be a necessary initial treatment strategy.
© 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.
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18 MeSH Terms
Noninvasive Computed Tomography-based Risk Stratification of Lung Adenocarcinomas in the National Lung Screening Trial.
Maldonado F, Duan F, Raghunath SM, Rajagopalan S, Karwoski RA, Garg K, Greco E, Nath H, Robb RA, Bartholmai BJ, Peikert T
(2015) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 192: 737-44
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Clinical Decision-Making, Decision Support Techniques, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Single-Blind Method, Survival Analysis, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
RATIONALE - Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography (CT) reduces lung cancer mortality. However, in addition to a high rate of benign nodules, lung cancer screening detects a large number of indolent cancers that generally belong to the adenocarcinoma spectrum. Individualized management of screen-detected adenocarcinomas would be facilitated by noninvasive risk stratification.
OBJECTIVES - To validate that Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield (CANARY), a novel image analysis software, successfully risk stratifies screen-detected lung adenocarcinomas based on clinical disease outcomes.
METHODS - We identified retrospective 294 eligible patients diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma spectrum lesions in the low-dose CT arm of the National Lung Screening Trial. The last low-dose CT scan before the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma was analyzed using CANARY blinded to clinical data. Based on their parametric CANARY signatures, all the lung adenocarcinoma nodules were risk stratified into three groups. CANARY risk groups were compared using survival analysis for progression-free survival.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - A total of 294 patients were included in the analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis of all the 294 adenocarcinoma nodules stratified into the Good, Intermediate, and Poor CANARY risk groups yielded distinct progression-free survival curves (P < 0.0001). This observation was confirmed in the unadjusted and adjusted (age, sex, race, and smoking status) progression-free survival analysis of all stage I cases.
CONCLUSIONS - CANARY allows the noninvasive risk stratification of lung adenocarcinomas into three groups with distinct post-treatment progression-free survival. Our results suggest that CANARY could ultimately facilitate individualized management of incidentally or screen-detected lung adenocarcinomas.
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18 MeSH Terms
The Intensive Diet and Exercise for Arthritis (IDEA) trial: 18-month radiographic and MRI outcomes.
Hunter DJ, Beavers DP, Eckstein F, Guermazi A, Loeser RF, Nicklas BJ, Mihalko SL, Miller GD, Lyles M, DeVita P, Legault C, Carr JJ, Williamson JD, Messier SP
(2015) Osteoarthritis Cartilage 23: 1090-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Body Mass Index, Combined Modality Therapy, Diet, Reducing, Disease Progression, Exercise Therapy, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Radiography, Severity of Illness Index, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2015
PURPOSE - Report the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) structural outcomes of an 18-month study of diet-induced weight loss, with or without exercise, compared to exercise alone in older, overweight and obese adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA).
METHODS - Prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled trial that enrolled 454 overweight and obese (body mass index, BMI = 27-41 kg m(-2)) older (age ≥ 55 yrs) adults with knee pain and radiographic evidence of femorotibial OA. Participants were randomized to one of three 18-month interventions: diet-induced weight loss only (D); diet-induced weight loss plus exercise (D + E); or exercise-only control (E). X-rays (N = 325) and MRIs (N = 105) were acquired at baseline and 18 months follow-up. X-ray and MRI (cartilage thickness and semi-quantitative (SQ)) results were analyzed to compare change between groups at 18-month follow-up using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for baseline values, baseline BMI, and gender.
RESULTS - Mean baseline descriptive characteristics of the cohort included: age, 65.6 yrs; BMI 33.6 kg m(-2); 72% female; 81% white. There was no significant difference between groups in joint space width (JSW) loss; D -0.07 (SE 0.22) mm, D + E -0.27 (SE 0.22) mm and E -0.16 (SE 0.24) mm (P = 0.79). There was also no significant difference in MRI cartilage loss between groups; D -0.10(0.05) mm, D + E -0.13(0.04) mm and E -0.05(0.04) mm (P = 0.42).
CONCLUSION - Despite the potent effects of weight loss in this study on symptoms as well as mechanistic outcomes (such as joint compressive force and markers of inflammation), there was no statistically significant difference between the three active interventions on the rate of structural progression either on X-ray or MRI over 18-months.
Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia differ between glimepiride and glyburide in non diabetic individuals.
Joy NG, Tate DB, Davis SN
(2015) Metabolism 64: 729-37
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Glucose, C-Peptide, Female, Glucagon, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glyburide, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Leptin, Male, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Single-Blind Method, Sulfonylurea Compounds
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Reported rates of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are lower with glimepiride as compared to glyburide. The aim of this study was to determine whether physiologic differences in counterregulatory neuroendocrine and metabolic mechanisms during hypoglycemia provide a basis for the observed clinical differences between glimepiride and glyburide.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Non-diabetic volunteers (age 38±2years, BMI 26±1kg/m(2)) were studied in a single-blind fashion during separate 2day randomized protocols consisting of 2h hyperinsulinemic (9pmol/kg/min) euglycemic (4.9±0.1mmol) and hypoglycemic (2.9±0.1mmol/L) clamps. Individuals received biologically equivalent doses of glimepiride (4mg) or glyburide (10mg) 1h prior to each glucose clamp (n=11) as well as a control group of placebo studies. Glucose kinetics were calculated using D-Glucose-6-6d2.
RESULTS - Insulin and C-peptide levels were increased (p<0.05) during euglycemia in both sulfonylurea groups as compared to placebo. However, despite equivalent hypoglycemia, insulin and C-peptide levels were higher (p<0.05) only after glyburide. Glucagon responses and endogenous glucose production (EGP) were decreased (p<0.05) during hypoglycemia following glyburide administration as compared to glimepiride. Glyburide reduced (p<0.05) norepinephrine responses during euglycemic clamps. In addition combined epinephrine and norepinephrine responses during hypoglycemia were reduced (p<0.05) following glyburide as compared to placebo. Leptin levels fell by a greater amount (p<0.05) during hypoglycemia with both sulfonylureas as compared to placebo.
CONCLUSIONS - In summary, glimepiride and glyburide can both similarly increase insulin and C-peptide levels during hyperinsulinemic euglycemia. However, during moderate hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (2.9mmol/L) glyburide resulted in increased C-peptide and insulin, but blunted glucagon, sympathetic nervous system and EGP responses. We conclude that glyburide can acutely reduce key neuroendocrine and metabolic counterregulatory defenses during hypoglycemia in healthy individuals.
Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms