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Cephalosporin Allergy: Current Understanding and Future Challenges.
Khan DA, Banerji A, Bernstein JA, Bilgicer B, Blumenthal K, Castells M, Ein D, Lang DM, Phillips E
(2019) J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 7: 2105-2114
MeSH Terms: Anaphylaxis, Basophil Degranulation Test, Cephalosporins, Cross Reactions, Desensitization, Immunologic, Drug Eruptions, Drug Hypersensitivity, Humans, Perioperative Period, Pharmacogenomic Variants, Serum Sickness, Skin Tests, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Cephalosporins are commonly used antibiotics both in hospitalized patients and in outpatients. Hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins are becoming increasingly common with a wide range of immunopathologic mechanisms. Cephalosporins are one of the leading causes for perioperative anaphylaxis and severe cutaneous adverse reactions. Patients allergic to cephalosporins tend to tolerate cephalosporins with disparate R1 side chains but may react to other beta-lactams with common R1 side chains. Skin testing for cephalosporins has not been well validated but appears to have a good negative predictive value for cephalosporins with disparate R1 side chains. In vitro tests including basophil activation tests have lower sensitivity when compared with skin testing. Rapid drug desensitization procedures are safe and effective and have been used successfully for immediate and some nonimmediate cephalosporin reactions. Many gaps in knowledge still exist regarding cephalosporin hypersensitivity.
Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Low-Dose Anti-Thymocyte Globulin (ATG) Preserves β-Cell Function and Improves HbA in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.
Haller MJ, Schatz DA, Skyler JS, Krischer JP, Bundy BN, Miller JL, Atkinson MA, Becker DJ, Baidal D, DiMeglio LA, Gitelman SE, Goland R, Gottlieb PA, Herold KC, Marks JB, Moran A, Rodriguez H, Russell W, Wilson DM, Greenbaum CJ, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet ATG-GCSF Study Group
(2018) Diabetes Care 41: 1917-1925
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antilymphocyte Serum, C-Peptide, Child, Cytoprotection, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Double-Blind Method, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Pilot Projects, Polyethylene Glycols, Recombinant Proteins, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - A pilot study suggested that combination therapy with low-dose anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) preserves C-peptide in established type 1 diabetes (T1D) (duration 4 months to 2 years). We hypothesized that ) low-dose ATG/GCSF or ) low-dose ATG alone would slow the decline of β-cell function in patients with new-onset T1D (duration <100 days).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A three-arm, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial was performed by the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group in 89 subjects: 29 subjects randomized to ATG (2.5 mg/kg intravenously) followed by pegylated GCSF (6 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 doses), 29 to ATG alone (2.5 mg/kg), and 31 to placebo. The primary end point was mean area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide during a 2-h mixed-meal tolerance test 1 year after initiation of therapy. Significance was defined as one-sided value < 0.025.
RESULTS - The 1-year mean AUC C-peptide was significantly higher in subjects treated with ATG (0.646 nmol/L) versus placebo (0.406 nmol/L) ( = 0.0003) but not in those treated with ATG/GCSF (0.528 nmol/L) versus placebo ( = 0.031). HbA was significantly reduced at 1 year in subjects treated with ATG and ATG/GCSF, = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - Low-dose ATG slowed decline of C-peptide and reduced HbA in new-onset T1D. Addition of GCSF did not enhance C-peptide preservation afforded by low-dose ATG. Future studies should be considered to determine whether low-dose ATG alone or in combination with other agents may prevent or delay the onset of the disease.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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Harnessing albumin as a carrier for cancer therapies.
Hoogenboezem EN, Duvall CL
(2018) Adv Drug Deliv Rev 130: 73-89
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Drug Carriers, Humans, Nanoparticles, Neoplasms, Serum Albumin
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Serum albumin, a natural ligand carrier that is highly concentrated and long-circulating in the blood, has shown remarkable promise as a carrier for anti-cancer agents. Albumin is able to prolong the circulation half-life of otherwise rapidly cleared drugs and, importantly, promote their accumulation within tumors. The applications for using albumin as a cancer drug carrier are broad and include both traditional cancer chemotherapeutics and new classes of biologics. Strategies for leveraging albumin for drug delivery can be classified broadly into exogenous and in situ binding formulations that utilize covalent attachment, non-covalent association, or encapsulation in albumin-based nanoparticles. These methods have shown remarkable preclinical and clinical successes that are examined in this review.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Regulation of ATP utilization during metastatic cell migration by collagen architecture.
Zanotelli MR, Goldblatt ZE, Miller JP, Bordeleau F, Li J, VanderBurgh JA, Lampi MC, King MR, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Mol Biol Cell 29: 1-9
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Diphosphate, Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Collagen, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Glucose, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intracellular Space, Neoplasm Metastasis, Rats, Serum
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Cell migration in a three-dimensional matrix requires that cells either remodel the surrounding matrix fibers and/or squeeze between the fibers to move. Matrix degradation, matrix remodeling, and changes in cell shape each require cells to expend energy. While significant research has been performed to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms guiding metastatic migration, less is known about cellular energy regulation and utilization during three-dimensional cancer cell migration. Here we introduce the use of the genetically encoded fluorescent biomarkers, PercevalHR and pHRed, to quantitatively assess ATP, ADP, and pH levels in MDA-MB-231 metastatic cancer cells as a function of the local collagen microenvironment. We find that the use of the probe is an effective tool for exploring the thermodynamics of cancer cell migration and invasion. Specifically, we find that the ATP:ADP ratio increases in cells in denser matrices, where migration is impaired, and it decreases in cells in aligned collagen matrices, where migration is facilitated. When migration is pharmacologically inhibited, the ATP:ADP ratio decreases. Together, our data indicate that matrix architecture alters cellular energetics and that intracellular ATP:ADP ratio is related to the ability of cancer cells to effectively migrate.
© 2018 Zanotelli, Goldblatt, Miller, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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Lipophilic siRNA targets albumin in situ and promotes bioavailability, tumor penetration, and carrier-free gene silencing.
Sarett SM, Werfel TA, Lee L, Jackson MA, Kilchrist KV, Brantley-Sieders D, Duvall CL
(2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114: E6490-E6497
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Gene Silencing, Humans, Neoplasms, RNA, Small Interfering, Serum Albumin, Human
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Clinical translation of therapies based on small interfering RNA (siRNA) is hampered by siRNA's comprehensively poor pharmacokinetic properties, which necessitate molecule modifications and complex delivery strategies. We sought an alternative approach to commonly used nanoparticle carriers by leveraging the long-lived endogenous serum protein albumin as an siRNA carrier. We synthesized siRNA conjugated to a diacyl lipid moiety (siRNA-L), which rapidly binds albumin in situ. siRNA-L, in comparison with unmodified siRNA, exhibited a 5.7-fold increase in circulation half-life, an 8.6-fold increase in bioavailability, and reduced renal accumulation. Benchmarked against leading commercial siRNA nanocarrier in vivo jetPEI, siRNA-L achieved 19-fold greater tumor accumulation and 46-fold increase in per-tumor-cell uptake in a mouse orthotopic model of human triple-negative breast cancer. siRNA-L penetrated tumor tissue rapidly and homogeneously; 30 min after i.v. injection, siRNA-L achieved uptake in 99% of tumor cells, compared with 60% for jetPEI. Remarkably, siRNA-L achieved a tumor:liver accumulation ratio >40:1 vs. <3:1 for jetPEI. The improved pharmacokinetic properties of siRNA-L facilitated significant tumor gene silencing for 7 d after two i.v. doses. Proof-of-concept was extended to a patient-derived xenograft model, in which jetPEI tumor accumulation was reduced fourfold relative to the same formulation in the orthotopic model. The siRNA-L tumor accumulation diminished only twofold, suggesting that the superior tumor distribution of the conjugate over nanoparticles will be accentuated in clinical situations. These data reveal the immense promise of in situ albumin targeting for development of translational, carrier-free RNAi-based cancer therapies.
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Effect of Drug Therapy on Net Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein-Enriched Serum in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Ormseth MJ, Yancey PG, Solus JF, Bridges SL, Curtis JR, Linton MF, Fazio S, Davies SS, Roberts LJ, Vickers KC, Kon V, Michael Stein C, TETRAD Investigators
(2016) Arthritis Rheumatol 68: 2099-105
MeSH Terms: Adalimumab, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Biological Transport, Blood Sedimentation, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Lipoproteins, HDL, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Methotrexate, Middle Aged, Serum
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Some RA therapies may modify this risk, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The cholesterol efflux capacity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is associated with a reduced CHD risk in non-RA populations; however, inflammation may impair the function of HDL. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether reduced inflammation resulting from treatment with methotrexate (MTX), adalimumab (ADA), or tocilizumab (TCZ) would increase the net cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL in patients with RA.
METHODS - A longitudinal multicenter study repository (Treatment Efficacy and Toxicity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Database and Repository) provided clinical information for and serum samples from 70 patients with RA before and 6 months after starting treatment with a new drug (MTX [n = 23], ADA [n = 22], or TCZ [n = 25]). Disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR). The net cholesterol efflux capacity was measured in paired serum samples using THP-1 macrophages, and total cellular cholesterol was measured by fluorometric assay.
RESULTS - The DAS28-ESR decreased with all treatments (P < 0.001). Net cholesterol efflux capacity was not significantly changed after 6 months of new RA therapy (mean ± SD 36.9 ± 17.3% units at baseline versus 38.0% ± 16.9% units at 6 months [P = 0.58]). However, change in net cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with change in the DAS28-ESR (ρ = -0.25, P = 0.04). In a post hoc analysis of patients with impaired net cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline, treatment with TCZ resulted in significant improvement in net cholesterol efflux capacity (21.9 ± 14.7% units at baseline versus 31.3% ± 12.8% units at 6 months [P < 0.02]), but this was not observed with MTX or ADA.
CONCLUSION - Net cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL cholesterol did not change significantly after 6 months of new RA therapy, except in patients with impaired baseline cholesterol efflux capacity who were receiving TCZ. Change in disease activity was associated with change in the net cholesterol efflux capacity.
© 2016, American College of Rheumatology.
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The pattern recognition reagents RAGE VC1 and peptide p5 share common binding sites and exhibit specific reactivity with AA amyloid in mice.
Kennel SJ, Williams A, Stuckey A, Richey T, Wooliver C, Chazin W, Stern DA, Martin EB, Wall JS
(2016) Amyloid 23: 8-16
MeSH Terms: Amyloidosis, Animals, Binding, Competitive, Iodine Radioisotopes, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Transgenic, Peptides, Protein Binding, Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products, Recombinant Proteins, Serum Amyloid A Protein, Technetium, Tissue Distribution, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
UNLABELLED - In the US, there remains a need to develop a clinical method for imaging amyloid load in patients with systemic, visceral amyloidosis. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which exists as a transmembrane receptor and soluble variant, is found associated with a number of amyloid deposits in man. It is unclear whether amyloid-associated RAGE is the membrane or soluble form; however, given the affinity of RAGE for amyloid, we have examined the ability of soluble RAGE VC1 to specifically localize with systemic AA amyloid in mice. We further compared the reactivity of RAGE VC1 with that of the synthetic, amyloid-reactive peptide p5.
METHODS - Binding of radiolabeled RAGE VC1 and p5 to synthetic amyloid fibrils was evaluated using in vitro "pulldown" assays in the presence or absence of RAGE ligands. Radioiodinated RAGE VC1 and technetium-99 m-labeled p5 were studied in mice with systemic AA amyloidosis using dual-energy SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and microautoradiography.
RESULTS - Soluble RAGE VC1 competed with radioiodinated peptide p5 for binding to rVλ6Wil, Aβ (1-40) and IAPP fibrils but not with the higher affinity peptide, p5R. Pre-incubation with AGE-BSA abrogated binding of VC1 and p5 to rVλ6Wil fibrils. Dual-energy SPECT/CT images and quantitative tissue biodistribution data showed that soluble RAGE VC1 specifically bound AA amyloid-laden organs in mice as effectively as peptide p5. Furthermore, microautoradiography confirmed that RAGE VC1 bound specifically to areas of Congo red-positive amyloid in mouse tissues but not in comparable tissues from control WT mice.
CONCLUSION - Soluble RAGE VC1 and peptide p5 have similar ligand binding properties and specifically localize with visceral AA amyloid deposits in mice.
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A combined analytical solution for chemical exchange saturation transfer and semi-solid magnetization transfer.
Zaiss M, Zu Z, Xu J, Schuenke P, Gochberg DF, Gore JC, Ladd ME, Bachert P
(2015) NMR Biomed 28: 217-30
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cattle, Computer Simulation, Creatine, Magnetic Phenomena, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Models, Theoretical, Phantoms, Imaging, Protons, Serum Albumin, Bovine, Water
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Off-resonant RF irradiation in tissue indirectly lowers the water signal by saturation transfer processes: on the one hand, there are selective chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects originating from exchanging endogenous protons resonating a few parts per million from water; on the other hand, there is the broad semi-solid magnetization transfer (MT) originating from immobile protons associated with the tissue matrix with kilohertz linewidths. Recently it was shown that endogenous CEST contrasts can be strongly affected by the MT background, so corrections are needed to derive accurate estimates of CEST effects. Herein we show that a full analytical solution of the underlying Bloch-McConnell equations for both MT and CEST provides insights into their interaction and suggests a simple means to isolate their effects. The presented analytical solution, based on the eigenspace solution of the Bloch-McConnell equations, extends previous treatments by allowing arbitrary lineshapes for the semi-solid MT effects and simultaneously describing multiple CEST pools in the presence of a large MT pool for arbitrary irradiation. The structure of the model indicates that semi-solid MT and CEST effects basically add up inversely in determining the steady-state Z-spectrum, as previously shown for direct saturation and CEST effects. Implications for existing previous CEST analyses in the presence of a semi-solid MT are studied and discussed. It turns out that, to accurately quantify CEST contrast, a good reference Z-value, the observed longitudinal relaxation rate of water, and the semi-solid MT pool size fraction must all be known.
Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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11 MeSH Terms
Protein modification by adenine propenal.
Shuck SC, Wauchope OR, Rose KL, Kingsley PJ, Rouzer CA, Shell SM, Sugitani N, Chazin WJ, Zagol-Ikapitte I, Boutaud O, Oates JA, Galligan JJ, Beavers WN, Marnett LJ
(2014) Chem Res Toxicol 27: 1732-42
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Amino Acid Sequence, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Cysteine, Fluorescence Polarization, Humans, Lysine, Molecular Sequence Data, Peptides, Serum Albumin, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Base propenals are products of the reaction of DNA with oxidants such as peroxynitrite and bleomycin. The most reactive base propenal, adenine propenal, is mutagenic in Escherichia coli and reacts with DNA to form covalent adducts; however, the reaction of adenine propenal with protein has not yet been investigated. A survey of the reaction of adenine propenal with amino acids revealed that lysine and cysteine form adducts, whereas histidine and arginine do not. N(ε)-Oxopropenyllysine, a lysine-lysine cross-link, and S-oxopropenyl cysteine are the major products. Comprehensive profiling of the reaction of adenine propenal with human serum albumin and the DNA repair protein, XPA, revealed that the only stable adduct is N(ε)-oxopropenyllysine. The most reactive sites for modification in human albumin are K190 and K351. Three sites of modification of XPA are in the DNA-binding domain, and two sites are subject to regulatory acetylation. Modification by adenine propenal dramatically reduces XPA's ability to bind to a DNA substrate.
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Assay of protein and peptide adducts of cholesterol ozonolysis products by hydrophobic and click enrichment methods.
Windsor K, Genaro-Mattos TC, Miyamoto S, Stec DF, Kim HY, Tallman KA, Porter NA
(2014) Chem Res Toxicol 27: 1757-68
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amino Acid Sequence, Biotin, Cholesterol, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Click Chemistry, Cytochromes c, Humans, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Isomerism, Molecular Sequence Data, Ozone, Peptides, Proteins, Serum Albumin, Solid Phase Extraction, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Streptavidin
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods-Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)-were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide-seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and asthma.
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