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Pneumococcal Community-Acquired Pneumonia Detected by Serotype-Specific Urinary Antigen Detection Assays.
Wunderink RG, Self WH, Anderson EJ, Balk R, Fakhran S, Courtney DM, Qi C, Williams DJ, Zhu Y, Whitney CG, Moore MR, Bramley A, Jain S, Edwards KM, Grijalva CG
(2018) Clin Infect Dis 66: 1504-1510
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antigens, Bacterial, Community-Acquired Infections, Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumococcal Infections, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Serogroup, Urinalysis
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered the leading bacterial cause of pneumonia in adults. Yet, it was not commonly detected by traditional culture-based and conventional urinary testing in a recent multicenter etiology study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We used novel serotype-specific urinary antigen detection (SSUAD) assays to determine whether pneumococcal cases were missed by traditional testing.
Methods - We studied adult patients hospitalized with CAP at 5 hospitals in Chicago and Nashville (2010-2012) and enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study. Traditional diagnostic testing included blood and sputum cultures and conventional urine antigen detection (ie, BinaxNOW). We applied SSUAD assays that target serotypes included in the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) to stored residual urine specimens.
Results - Among 1736 patients with SSUAD and ≥1 traditional pneumococcal test performed, we identified 169 (9.7%) cases of pneumococcal CAP. Traditional tests identified 93 (5.4%) and SSUAD identified 76 (4.4%) additional cases. Among 14 PCV13-serotype cases identified by culture, SSUAD correctly identified the same serotype in all of them. Cases identified by SSUAD vs traditional tests were similar in most demographic and clinical characteristics, although disease severity and procalcitonin concentration were highest among those with positive blood cultures. The proportion of pneumonia cases caused by serotypes exclusively covered by PCV13 was not significantly different between the first and second July-June study periods (6.4% vs 4.0%).
Conclusions - Although restricted to the detection of only 13 serotypes, SSUAD testing substantially increased the detection of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults hospitalized with CAP.
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13 MeSH Terms
Differing mechanisms of surviving phagosomal stress among group B Streptococcus strains of varying genotypes.
Korir ML, Laut C, Rogers LM, Plemmons JA, Aronoff DM, Manning SD
(2017) Virulence 8: 924-937
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Genotype, Humans, Macrophages, Phagocytosis, Phagosomes, Serogroup, Serotyping, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus agalactiae, Stress, Physiological, THP-1 Cells, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, asymptomatically colonizes up to 30% of women and can persistently colonize even after antibiotic treatment. Previous studies have shown that GBS resides inside macrophages, but the mechanism by which it survives remains unknown. Here, we examined the ability of 4 GBS strains to survive inside macrophages and then focused on 2 strains belonging to sequence type (ST)-17 and ST-12, to examine persistence in the presence of antibiotics. A multiple stress medium was also developed using several stressors found in the phagosome to assess the ability of 30 GBS strains to withstand phagosomal stress. The ST-17 strain was more readily phagocytosed and survived intracellularly longer than the ST-12 strain, but the ST-12 strain was tolerant to ampicillin unlike the ST-17 strain. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and erythromycin increased the level of phagocytosis of the ST-17 strain, but had no effect on the ST-12 strain. In addition, blocking acidification of the phagosome decreased the survival of the ST-17 strain indicating a pH-dependent survival mechanism for the ST-17 strain. Congruent with the macrophage experiments, the ST-17 strain had a higher survival rate in the multiple stress medium than the ST-12 strain, and overall, serotype III isolates survived significantly better than other serotypes. These results indicate that diverse GBS strains may use differing mechanisms to persist and that serotype III strains are better able to survive specific stressors inside the phagosome relative to other serotypes.
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14 MeSH Terms
Bacterial Density, Serotype Distribution and Antibiotic Resistance of Pneumococcal Strains from the Nasopharynx of Peruvian Children Before and After Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7.
Hanke CR, Grijalva CG, Chochua S, Pletz MW, Hornberg C, Edwards KM, Griffin MR, Verastegui H, Gil AI, Lanata CF, Klugman KP, Vidal JE
(2016) Pediatr Infect Dis J 35: 432-9
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Load, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine, Humans, Infant, Male, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Nasopharynx, Peru, Pneumococcal Infections, Prevalence, Serogroup, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) have decreased nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine types but little data exist from rural areas. We investigated bacterial density, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance of pneumococcal strains within the nasopharynx of young children in the Peruvian Andes, 2 years after PCV7 was introduced.
METHODS - Pneumococcal strains were isolated from a subset of 125 children from our Peruvian cohort, who entered the study in 2009 and had pneumococcus detected in the nasopharynx in both 2009 and during follow-up in 2011. Strains were Quellung serotyped and tested for susceptibility to antibiotics. Bacterial density was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.
RESULTS - The prevalence of PCV7 strains decreased from 48% in 2009 to 28.8% in 2011, whereas non-PCV7 types increased from 52% to 71.2% (P = 0.002). There was a 3.5-fold increase in carriage of serotype 6C in 2011 (P = 0.026). Vaccination with PCV7 did not affect pneumococcal density in children colonized by a PCV7 type but did increase density in those colonized with a non-PCV7 type. Antibiotic resistance did not change after vaccine introduction; strains were nonsusceptible to tetracycline (97.2%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56.4%), penicillin (34%), erythromycin (22.4%), chloramphenicol (18.8%) and clindamycin (12.4%).
CONCLUSIONS - Serotype replacement was observed post-PCV7 vaccination with a concomitant, not previously recognized, increased nasopharyngeal density.
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Functional Transplant of a Dengue Virus Serotype 3 (DENV3)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Epitope into DENV1.
Messer WB, Yount BL, Royal SR, de Alwis R, Widman DG, Smith SA, Crowe JE, Pfaff JM, Kahle KM, Doranz BJ, Ibarra KD, Harris E, de Silva AM, Baric RS
(2016) J Virol 90: 5090-5097
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Cross Reactions, Dengue, Dengue Virus, Disease Models, Animal, Epitopes, Genetic Engineering, Humans, Mice, Neutralization Tests, Serogroup
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2016
UNLABELLED - The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV1 through 4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. While first infection confers long-term protective immunity against viruses of the infecting serotype, a second infection with virus of a different serotype carries a greater risk of severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that humans exposed to DENV infections develop neutralizing antibodies that bind to quaternary epitopes formed by the viral envelope (E) protein dimers or higher-order assemblies required for the formation of the icosahedral viral envelope. Here we show that the quaternary epitope target of the human DENV3-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5J7 can be partially transplanted into a DENV1 strain by changing the core residues of the epitope contained within a single monomeric E molecule. MAb 5J7 neutralized the recombinant DENV1/3 strain in cell culture and was protective in a mouse model of infection with the DENV1/3 strain. However, the 5J7 epitope was only partially recreated by transplantation of the core residues because MAb 5J7 bound and neutralized wild-type (WT) DENV3 better than the DENV1/3 recombinant. Our studies demonstrate that it is possible to transplant a large number of discontinuous residues between DENV serotypes and partially recreate a complex antibody epitope, while retaining virus viability. Further refinement of this approach may lead to new tools for measuring epitope-specific antibody responses and new vaccine platforms.
IMPORTANCE - Dengue virus is the most important mosquito-borne pathogen of humans worldwide, with approximately one-half the world's population living in regions where dengue is endemic. Dengue immunity following infection is robust and thought to be conferred by antibodies raised against the infecting virus. However, the specific viral components that these antibodies recognize and how they neutralize the virus have been incompletely described. Here we map a region on dengue virus serotype 3 recognized by the human neutralizing antibody 5J7 and then test the functional significance of this region by transplanting it into a serotype 1 virus. Our studies demonstrate a region on dengue virus necessary for 5J7 binding and neutralization. Our work also demonstrates the technical feasibility of engineering dengue viruses to display targets of protective antibodies. This technology can be used to develop new dengue vaccines and diagnostic assays.
Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Racial and Regional Differences in Rates of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.
de St Maurice A, Grijalva CG, Fonnesbeck C, Schaffner W, Halasa NB
(2015) Pediatrics 136: e1186-94
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Male, Pneumococcal Infections, Pneumococcal Vaccines, Serogroup, Tennessee, Vaccines, Conjugate
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) remains an important cause of illness in US children. We assessed the impact of introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on pediatric IPD rates, as well as changes in racial and regional differences in IPD, in Tennessee.
METHODS - Data from active laboratory and population-based surveillance of IPD were used to compare IPD rates in the early-PCV7 (2001-2004), late-PCV7 (2005-2009), and post-PCV13 (2011-2012) eras. IPD rates were further stratified according to age, race, and region (east and middle-west TN).
RESULTS - Among children aged <2 years, IPD rates declined by 70% from 67 to 19 per 100 000 person-years in the early-PCV7 era and post-PCV13 era, respectively. Similar decreasing trends in IPD rates were observed in older children aged 2 to 4 years and 5 to 17 years. In the late-PCV7 era, IPD rates in children aged <2 years were higher in black children compared with white children (70 vs 43 per 100 000 person-years); however, these racial differences in IPD rates were no longer significant after PCV13 introduction. Before PCV13, IPD rates in children aged <2 years were also higher in east Tennessee compared with middle-west Tennessee (91 vs 45 per 100 000 person-years), but these differences were no longer significant in the post-PCV13 era.
CONCLUSIONS - PCV13 introduction led to substantial declines in childhood IPD rates and was associated with reduced regional and racial differences in IPD rates in Tennessee.
Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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DENGUE VIRUS. Cryo-EM structure of an antibody that neutralizes dengue virus type 2 by locking E protein dimers.
Fibriansah G, Ibarra KD, Ng TS, Smith SA, Tan JL, Lim XN, Ooi JS, Kostyuchenko VA, Wang J, de Silva AM, Harris E, Crowe JE, Lok SM
(2015) Science 349: 88-91
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Coinfection, Cross Reactions, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Dengue Virus, Disease Models, Animal, Epitopes, Humans, Mice, Serogroup, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added January 26, 2016
There are four closely-related dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. Infection with one serotype generates antibodies that may cross-react and enhance infection with other serotypes in a secondary infection. We demonstrated that DENV serotype 2 (DENV2)-specific human monoclonal antibody (HMAb) 2D22 is therapeutic in a mouse model of antibody-enhanced severe dengue disease. We determined the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of HMAb 2D22 complexed with two different DENV2 strains. HMAb 2D22 binds across viral envelope (E) proteins in the dimeric structure, which probably blocks the E protein reorganization required for virus fusion. HMAb 2D22 "locks" two-thirds of or all dimers on the virus surface, depending on the strain, but neutralizes these DENV2 strains with equal potency. The epitope defined by HMAb 2D22 is a potential target for vaccines and therapeutics.
Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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13 MeSH Terms
Glycan engagement dictates hydrocephalus induction by serotype 1 reovirus.
Stencel-Baerenwald J, Reiss K, Blaum BS, Colvin D, Li XN, Abel T, Boyd K, Stehle T, Dermody TS
(2015) mBio 6: e02356
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, G(M2) Ganglioside, Hydrocephalus, Mice, Receptors, Virus, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Serogroup, Virus Attachment
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
UNLABELLED - Receptors expressed on the host cell surface adhere viruses to target cells and serve as determinants of viral tropism. Several viruses bind cell surface glycans to facilitate entry, but the contribution of specific glycan moieties to viral disease is incompletely understood. Reovirus provides a tractable experimental model for studies of viral neuropathogenesis. In newborn mice, serotype 1 (T1) reovirus causes hydrocephalus, whereas serotype 3 (T3) reovirus causes encephalitis. T1 and T3 reoviruses engage distinct glycans, suggesting that glycan-binding capacity contributes to these differences in pathogenesis. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we engineered a mutant T1 reovirus incapable of binding the T1 reovirus-specific glycan receptor, GM2. The mutant virus induced substantially less hydrocephalus than wild-type virus, an effect phenocopied by wild-type virus infection of GM2-deficient mice. In comparison to wild-type virus, yields of mutant virus were diminished in cultured ependymal cells, the cell type that lines the brain ventricles. These findings suggest that GM2 engagement targets reovirus to ependymal cells in mice and illuminate the function of glycan engagement in reovirus serotype-dependent disease.
IMPORTANCE - Receptor utilization strongly influences viral disease, often dictating host range and target cell selection. Different reovirus serotypes bind to different glycans, but a precise function for these molecules in pathogenesis is unknown. We used type 1 (T1) reovirus deficient in binding the GM2 glycan and mice lacking GM2 to pinpoint a role for glycan engagement in hydrocephalus caused by T1 reovirus. This work indicates that engagement of a specific glycan can lead to infection of specific cells in the host and consequent disease at that site. Since reovirus is being developed as a vaccine vector and oncolytic agent, understanding reovirus-glycan interactions may allow manipulation of reovirus glycan-binding properties for therapeutic applications.
Copyright © 2015 Stencel-Baerenwald et al.
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A highly potent human antibody neutralizes dengue virus serotype 3 by binding across three surface proteins.
Fibriansah G, Tan JL, Smith SA, de Alwis R, Ng TS, Kostyuchenko VA, Jadi RS, Kukkaro P, de Silva AM, Crowe JE, Lok SM
(2015) Nat Commun 6: 6341
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Cell Membrane, Chlorocebus aethiops, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Dengue, Dengue Virus, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Epitopes, Genotype, Humans, Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Molecular Sequence Data, Neutralization Tests, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, Serogroup, Vero Cells
Show Abstract · Added January 26, 2016
Dengue virus (DENV) infects ~400 million people annually. There is no licensed vaccine or therapeutic drug. Only a small fraction of the total DENV-specific antibodies in a naturally occurring dengue infection consists of highly neutralizing antibodies. Here we show that the DENV-specific human monoclonal antibody 5J7 is exceptionally potent, neutralizing 50% of virus at nanogram-range antibody concentration. The 9 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Fab 5J7-DENV complex shows that a single Fab molecule binds across three envelope proteins and engages three functionally important domains, each from a different envelope protein. These domains are critical for receptor binding and fusion to the endosomal membrane. The ability to bind to multiple domains allows the antibody to fully coat the virus surface with only 60 copies of Fab, that is, half the amount compared with other potent antibodies. Our study reveals a highly efficient and unusual mechanism of molecular recognition by an antibody.
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24 MeSH Terms