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Genomic medicine for undiagnosed diseases.
Wise AL, Manolio TA, Mensah GA, Peterson JF, Roden DM, Tamburro C, Williams MS, Green ED
(2019) Lancet 394: 533-540
MeSH Terms: Adult, Child, Early Diagnosis, Genomics, Humans, Phenotype, Prenatal Diagnosis, Rare Diseases, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Whole Exome Sequencing, Whole Genome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
One of the primary goals of genomic medicine is to improve diagnosis through identification of genomic conditions, which could improve clinical management, prevent complications, and promote health. We explore how genomic medicine is being used to obtain molecular diagnoses for patients with previously undiagnosed diseases in prenatal, paediatric, and adult clinical settings. We focus on the role of clinical genomic sequencing (exome and genome) in aiding patients with conditions that are undiagnosed even after extensive clinical evaluation and testing. In particular, we explore the impact of combining genomic and phenotypic data and integrating multiple data types to improve diagnoses for patients with undiagnosed diseases, and we discuss how these genomic sequencing diagnoses could change clinical management.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Delirium During Sepsis.
Samuels DC, Hulgan T, Fessel JP, Billings FT, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Girard TD
(2019) Crit Care Med 47: 1065-1071
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Critical Illness, DNA, Mitochondrial, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Retrospective Studies, Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2019
OBJECTIVES - Studies suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies some forms of sepsis-induced organ failure. We sought to test the hypothesis that variations in mitochondrial DNA haplogroup affect susceptibility to sepsis-associated delirium, a common manifestation of acute brain dysfunction during sepsis.
DESIGN - Retrospective cohort study.
SETTING - Medical and surgical ICUs at a large tertiary care center.
PATIENTS - Caucasian and African American adults with sepsis.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - We determined each patient's mitochondrial DNA haplogroup using single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping data in a DNA databank and extracted outcomes from linked electronic medical records. We then used zero-inflated negative binomial regression to analyze age-adjusted associations between mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and duration of delirium, identified using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. Eight-hundred ten patients accounted for 958 sepsis admissions, with 802 (84%) by Caucasians and 156 (16%) by African Americans. In total, 795 patient admissions (83%) involved one or more days of delirium. The 7% of Caucasians belonging to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup clade IWX experienced more delirium than the 49% in haplogroup H, the most common Caucasian haplogroup (age-adjusted rate ratio for delirium 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.64; p = 0.001). Alternatively, among African Americans the 24% in haplogroup L2 experienced less delirium than those in haplogroup L3, the most common African haplogroup (adjusted rate ratio for delirium 0.60; 95% CI, 0.38-0.94; p = 0.03).
CONCLUSIONS - Variations in mitochondrial DNA are associated with development of and protection from delirium in Caucasians and African Americans during sepsis. Future studies are now required to determine whether mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of delirium during sepsis so that targeted treatments can be developed.
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14 MeSH Terms
High frequency of shared clonotypes in human B cell receptor repertoires.
Soto C, Bombardi RG, Branchizio A, Kose N, Matta P, Sevy AM, Sinkovits RS, Gilchuk P, Finn JA, Crowe JE
(2019) Nature 566: 398-402
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Antigens, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Clone Cells, Female, Fetal Blood, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The human genome contains approximately 20 thousand protein-coding genes, but the size of the collection of antigen receptors of the adaptive immune system that is generated by the recombination of gene segments with non-templated junctional additions (on B cells) is unknown-although it is certainly orders of magnitude larger. It has not been established whether individuals possess unique (or private) repertoires or substantial components of shared (or public) repertoires. Here we sequence recombined and expressed B cell receptor genes in several individuals to determine the size of their B cell receptor repertoires, and the extent to which these are shared between individuals. Our experiments revealed that the circulating repertoire of each individual contained between 9 and 17 million B cell clonotypes. The three individuals that we studied shared many clonotypes, including between 1 and 6% of B cell heavy-chain clonotypes shared between two subjects (0.3% of clonotypes shared by all three) and 20 to 34% of λ or κ light chains shared between two subjects (16 or 22% of λ or κ light chains, respectively, were shared by all three). Some of the B cell clonotypes had thousands of clones, or somatic variants, within the clonotype lineage. Although some of these shared lineages might be driven by exposure to common antigens, previous exposure to foreign antigens was not the only force that shaped the shared repertoires, as we also identified shared clonotypes in umbilical cord blood samples and all adult repertoires. The unexpectedly high prevalence of shared clonotypes in B cell repertoires, and identification of the sequences of these shared clonotypes, should enable better understanding of the role of B cell immune repertoires in health and disease.
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15 MeSH Terms
Prediction of gene regulatory enhancers across species reveals evolutionarily conserved sequence properties.
Chen L, Fish AE, Capra JA
(2018) PLoS Comput Biol 14: e1006484
MeSH Terms: Animals, Conserved Sequence, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Evolution, Molecular, Genomics, Humans, Machine Learning, Mammals, Neural Networks, Computer, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Support Vector Machine
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Genomic regions with gene regulatory enhancer activity turnover rapidly across mammals. In contrast, gene expression patterns and transcription factor binding preferences are largely conserved between mammalian species. Based on this conservation, we hypothesized that enhancers active in different mammals would exhibit conserved sequence patterns in spite of their different genomic locations. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the extent to which sequence patterns that are predictive of enhancers in one species are predictive of enhancers in other mammalian species by training and testing two types of machine learning models. We trained support vector machine (SVM) and convolutional neural network (CNN) classifiers to distinguish enhancers defined by histone marks from the genomic background based on DNA sequence patterns in human, macaque, mouse, dog, cow, and opossum. The classifiers accurately identified many adult liver, developing limb, and developing brain enhancers, and the CNNs outperformed the SVMs. Furthermore, classifiers trained in one species and tested in another performed nearly as well as classifiers trained and tested on the same species. We observed similar cross-species conservation when applying the models to human and mouse enhancers validated in transgenic assays. This indicates that many short sequence patterns predictive of enhancers are largely conserved. The sequence patterns most predictive of enhancers in each species matched the binding motifs for a common set of TFs enriched for expression in relevant tissues, supporting the biological relevance of the learned features. Thus, despite the rapid change of active enhancer locations between mammals, cross-species enhancer prediction is often possible. Our results suggest that short sequence patterns encoding enhancer activity have been maintained across more than 180 million years of mammalian evolution.
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Sequence-based HLA-A, B, C, DP, DQ, and DR typing of 496 adults from San Diego, California, USA.
Moore E, Grifoni A, Weiskopf D, Schulten V, Arlehamn CSL, Angelo M, Pham J, Leary S, Sidney J, Broide D, Frazier A, Phillips E, Mallal S, Mack SJ, Sette A
(2018) Hum Immunol 79: 821-822
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Alleles, California, Female, Gene Frequency, Genotype, Genotyping Techniques, HLA-A Antigens, HLA-B Antigens, HLA-C Antigens, HLA-DP Antigens, HLA-DQ Antigens, HLA-DR Antigens, Histocompatibility Testing, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Male, Middle Aged, Sequence Analysis, DNA, T-Lymphocytes, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
DNA sequence-based typing at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1 loci was performed on 496 healthy adult donors from San Diego, California, to characterize allele frequencies in support of studies of T cell responses to common allergens. Deviations from Hardy Weinberg proportions were detected at each locus except A and C. Several alleles were found in more than 15% of individuals, including the class II alleles DPB1∗02:01, DPB1∗04:01, DQA1∗01:02, DQA1∗05:01, DQB1∗03:01, and the class I allele A∗02:01. Genotype data will be available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database (AFND 3562).
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Molecular and epidemiologic characterization of Wilms tumor from Baghdad, Iraq.
Phelps HM, Al-Jadiry MF, Corbitt NM, Pierce JM, Li B, Wei Q, Flores RR, Correa H, Uccini S, Frangoul H, Alsaadawi AR, Al-Badri SAF, Al-Darraji AF, Al-Saeed RM, Al-Hadad SA, Lovvorn Iii HN
(2018) World J Pediatr 14: 585-593
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Child, Preschool, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Female, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, Iraq, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, Mutation, N-Myc Proto-Oncogene Protein, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules, Nuclear Proteins, Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins, Receptors, Retinoic Acid, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, WT1 Proteins, Wilms Tumor, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added January 28, 2019
BACKGROUND - Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide, yet its incidence and clinical behavior vary according to race and access to adequate healthcare resources. To guide and streamline therapy in the war-torn and resource-constrained city of Baghdad, Iraq, we conducted a first-ever molecular analysis of 20 WT specimens to characterize the biological features of this lethal disease within this challenged population.
METHODS - Next-generation sequencing of ten target genes associated with WT development and treatment resistance (WT1, CTNNB1, WTX, IGF2, CITED1, SIX2, p53, N-MYC, CRABP2, and TOP2A) was completed. Immunohistochemistry was performed for 6 marker proteins of WT (WT1, CTNNB1, NCAM, CITED1, SIX2, and p53). Patient outcomes were compiled.
RESULTS - Mutations were detected in previously described WT "hot spots" (e.g., WT1 and CTNNB1) as well as novel loci that may be unique to the Iraqi population. Immunohistochemistry showed expression domains most typical of blastemal-predominant WT. Remarkably, despite the challenges facing families and care providers, only one child, with combined WT1 and CTNNB1 mutations, was confirmed dead from disease. Median clinical follow-up was 40.5 months (range 6-78 months).
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that WT biology within a population of Iraqi children manifests features both similar to and unique from disease variants in other regions of the world. These observations will help to risk stratify WT patients living in this difficult environment to more or less intensive therapies and to focus treatment on cell-specific targets.
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27 MeSH Terms
Empowering genomic medicine by establishing critical sequencing result data flows: the eMERGE example.
Aronson S, Babb L, Ames D, Gibbs RA, Venner E, Connelly JJ, Marsolo K, Weng C, Williams MS, Hartzler AL, Liang WH, Ralston JD, Devine EB, Murphy S, Chute CG, Caraballo PJ, Kullo IJ, Freimuth RR, Rasmussen LV, Wehbe FH, Peterson JF, Robinson JR, Wiley K, Overby Taylor C, eMERGE Network EHRI Working Group
(2018) J Am Med Inform Assoc 25: 1375-1381
MeSH Terms: Computer Communication Networks, Electronic Health Records, Genetic Testing, Genome, Human, Genomics, Humans, Information Dissemination, Sequence Analysis, DNA, United States
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2018
The eMERGE Network is establishing methods for electronic transmittal of patient genetic test results from laboratories to healthcare providers across organizational boundaries. We surveyed the capabilities and needs of different network participants, established a common transfer format, and implemented transfer mechanisms based on this format. The interfaces we created are examples of the connectivity that must be instantiated before electronic genetic and genomic clinical decision support can be effectively built at the point of care. This work serves as a case example for both standards bodies and other organizations working to build the infrastructure required to provide better electronic clinical decision support for clinicians.
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Scalable Open Science Approach for Mutation Calling of Tumor Exomes Using Multiple Genomic Pipelines.
Ellrott K, Bailey MH, Saksena G, Covington KR, Kandoth C, Stewart C, Hess J, Ma S, Chiotti KE, McLellan M, Sofia HJ, Hutter C, Getz G, Wheeler D, Ding L, MC3 Working Group, Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network
(2018) Cell Syst 6: 271-281.e7
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Exome, Genomics, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Information Dissemination, Mutation, Neoplasms, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Software, Whole Exome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cancer genomics dataset includes over 10,000 tumor-normal exome pairs across 33 different cancer types, in total >400 TB of raw data files requiring analysis. Here we describe the Multi-Center Mutation Calling in Multiple Cancers project, our effort to generate a comprehensive encyclopedia of somatic mutation calls for the TCGA data to enable robust cross-tumor-type analyses. Our approach accounts for variance and batch effects introduced by the rapid advancement of DNA extraction, hybridization-capture, sequencing, and analysis methods over time. We present best practices for applying an ensemble of seven mutation-calling algorithms with scoring and artifact filtering. The dataset created by this analysis includes 3.5 million somatic variants and forms the basis for PanCan Atlas papers. The results have been made available to the research community along with the methods used to generate them. This project is the result of collaboration from a number of institutes and demonstrates how team science drives extremely large genomics projects.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Loss of HCN2 leads to delayed gastrointestinal motility and reduced energy intake in mice.
Fisher DW, Luu P, Agarwal N, Kurz JE, Chetkovich DM
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0193012
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Energy Intake, Female, Gastrointestinal Motility, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mutagenesis, Insertional, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are important regulators of excitability in neural, cardiac, and other pacemaking cells, which are often altered in disease. In mice, loss of HCN2 leads to cardiac dysrhythmias, persistent spike-wave discharges similar to those seen in absence epilepsy, ataxia, tremor, reduced neuropathic and inflammatory pain, antidepressant-like behavior, infertility, and severely restricted growth. While many of these phenotypes have tissue-specific mechanisms, the cause of restricted growth in HCN2 knockout animals remains unknown. Here, we characterize a novel, 3kb insertion mutation of Hcn2 in the Tremor and Reduced Lifespan 2 (TRLS/2J) mouse that leads to complete loss of HCN2 protein, and we show that this mutation causes many phenotypes similar to other mice lacking HCN2 expression. We then demonstrate that while TRLS/2J mice have low blood glucose levels and impaired growth, dysfunction in hormonal secretion from the pancreas, pituitary, and thyroid are unlikely to lead to this phenotype. Instead, we find that homozygous TRLS/2J mice have abnormal gastrointestinal function that is characterized by less food consumption and delayed gastrointestinal transit as compared to wildtype mice. In summary, a novel mutation in HCN2 likely leads to impaired GI motility, causing the severe growth restriction seen in mice with mutations that eliminate HCN2 expression.
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Sequence-based HLA-A, B, C, DP, DQ, and DR typing of 159 individuals from the Worcester region of the Western Cape province of South Africa.
Grifoni A, Sidney J, Carpenter C, Phillips E, Mallal S, Scriba TJ, Sette A, Lindestam Arlehamn CS
(2018) Hum Immunol 79: 143-144
MeSH Terms: Databases, Genetic, Gene Frequency, Genotype, HLA-A Antigens, HLA-B Antigens, HLA-C Antigens, HLA-DQ Antigens, HLA-DR Antigens, Humans, Lymphocyte Activation, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Sequence Analysis, DNA, South Africa, T-Lymphocytes, Tuberculosis
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
DNA sequence-based typing at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1, and -DRB3/4/5 loci was performed on samples provided by 159 individuals from the Worcester region of the Western Cape province of South Africa. The purpose of the study was to characterize allele frequencies in the local population, to support studies of T cell immunity against pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There are no detectable deviations from Hardy Weinberg proportions for the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, and -DRB1 loci. A minor deviation was detected at the HLA-DQB1 locus due to an excess of homozygotes. The genotype data are available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under identifier 3425.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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