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Cryo-EM structures of the human cation-chloride cotransporter KCC1.
Liu S, Chang S, Han B, Xu L, Zhang M, Zhao C, Yang W, Wang F, Li J, Delpire E, Ye S, Bai XC, Guo J
(2019) Science 366: 505-508
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Binding Sites, Cryoelectron Microscopy, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Ion Transport, Mice, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Oocytes, Protein Domains, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Sequence Alignment, Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters, Symporters, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) mediate the coupled, electroneutral symport of cations with chloride across the plasma membrane and are vital for cell volume regulation, salt reabsorption in the kidney, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated modulation in neurons. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of human potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC1 in potassium chloride or sodium chloride at 2.9- to 3.5-angstrom resolution. KCC1 exists as a dimer, with both extracellular and transmembrane domains involved in dimerization. The structural and functional analyses, along with computational studies, reveal one potassium site and two chloride sites in KCC1, which are all required for the ion transport activity. KCC1 adopts an inward-facing conformation, with the extracellular gate occluded. The KCC1 structures allow us to model a potential ion transport mechanism in KCCs and provide a blueprint for drug design.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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17 MeSH Terms
Potent anti-influenza H7 human monoclonal antibody induces separation of hemagglutinin receptor-binding head domains.
Turner HL, Pallesen J, Lang S, Bangaru S, Urata S, Li S, Cottrell CA, Bowman CA, Crowe JE, Wilson IA, Ward AB
(2019) PLoS Biol 17: e3000139
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Baculoviridae, Binding Sites, Cloning, Molecular, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Gene Expression, Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus, Hydrogen Bonding, Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments, Influenza A virus, Molecular Docking Simulation, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Conformation, beta-Strand, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Recombinant Proteins, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, Sf9 Cells, Spodoptera
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Seasonal influenza virus infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality, but the threat from the emergence of a new pandemic influenza strain might have potentially even more devastating consequences. As such, there is intense interest in isolating and characterizing potent neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin (HA) viral surface glycoprotein. Here, we use cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) to decipher the mechanism of action of a potent HA head-directed monoclonal antibody (mAb) bound to an influenza H7 HA. The epitope of the antibody is not solvent accessible in the compact, prefusion conformation that typifies all HA structures to date. Instead, the antibody binds between HA head protomers to an epitope that must be partly or transiently exposed in the prefusion conformation. The "breathing" of the HA protomers is implied by the exposure of this epitope, which is consistent with metastability of class I fusion proteins. This structure likely therefore represents an early structural intermediate in the viral fusion process. Understanding the extent of transient exposure of conserved neutralizing epitopes also may lead to new opportunities to combat influenza that have not been appreciated previously.
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23 MeSH Terms
HCV Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Use a CDRH3 Disulfide Motif to Recognize an E2 Glycoprotein Site that Can Be Targeted for Vaccine Design.
Flyak AI, Ruiz S, Colbert MD, Luong T, Crowe JE, Bailey JR, Bjorkman PJ
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 703-716.e3
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Disulfides, Drug Design, Epitopes, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Sequence Alignment, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Hepatitis Vaccines, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine efforts are hampered by the extensive genetic diversity of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Structures of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) (e.g., HEPC3, HEPC74) isolated from individuals who spontaneously cleared HCV infection facilitate immunogen design to elicit antibodies against multiple HCV variants. However, challenges in expressing HCV glycoproteins previously limited bNAb-HCV structures to complexes with truncated E2 cores. Here we describe crystal structures of full-length E2 ectodomain complexes with HEPC3 and HEPC74, revealing lock-and-key antibody-antigen interactions, E2 regions (including a target of immunogen design) that were truncated or disordered in E2 cores, and an antibody CDRH3 disulfide motif that exhibits common interactions with a conserved epitope despite different bNAb-E2 binding orientations. The structures display unusual features relevant to common genetic signatures of HCV bNAbs and demonstrate extraordinary plasticity in antibody-antigen interactions. In addition, E2 variants that bind HEPC3/HEPC74-like germline precursors may represent candidate vaccine immunogens.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Prediction of gene regulatory enhancers across species reveals evolutionarily conserved sequence properties.
Chen L, Fish AE, Capra JA
(2018) PLoS Comput Biol 14: e1006484
MeSH Terms: Animals, Conserved Sequence, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Evolution, Molecular, Genomics, Humans, Machine Learning, Mammals, Neural Networks, Computer, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Support Vector Machine
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Genomic regions with gene regulatory enhancer activity turnover rapidly across mammals. In contrast, gene expression patterns and transcription factor binding preferences are largely conserved between mammalian species. Based on this conservation, we hypothesized that enhancers active in different mammals would exhibit conserved sequence patterns in spite of their different genomic locations. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the extent to which sequence patterns that are predictive of enhancers in one species are predictive of enhancers in other mammalian species by training and testing two types of machine learning models. We trained support vector machine (SVM) and convolutional neural network (CNN) classifiers to distinguish enhancers defined by histone marks from the genomic background based on DNA sequence patterns in human, macaque, mouse, dog, cow, and opossum. The classifiers accurately identified many adult liver, developing limb, and developing brain enhancers, and the CNNs outperformed the SVMs. Furthermore, classifiers trained in one species and tested in another performed nearly as well as classifiers trained and tested on the same species. We observed similar cross-species conservation when applying the models to human and mouse enhancers validated in transgenic assays. This indicates that many short sequence patterns predictive of enhancers are largely conserved. The sequence patterns most predictive of enhancers in each species matched the binding motifs for a common set of TFs enriched for expression in relevant tissues, supporting the biological relevance of the learned features. Thus, despite the rapid change of active enhancer locations between mammals, cross-species enhancer prediction is often possible. Our results suggest that short sequence patterns encoding enhancer activity have been maintained across more than 180 million years of mammalian evolution.
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MeSH Terms
Rapid antigen tests for dengue virus serotypes and Zika virus in patient serum.
Bosch I, de Puig H, Hiley M, Carré-Camps M, Perdomo-Celis F, Narváez CF, Salgado DM, Senthoor D, O'Grady M, Phillips E, Durbin A, Fandos D, Miyazaki H, Yen CW, Gélvez-Ramírez M, Warke RV, Ribeiro LS, Teixeira MM, Almeida RP, Muñóz-Medina JE, Ludert JE, Nogueira ML, Colombo TE, Terzian ACB, Bozza PT, Calheiros AS, Vieira YR, Barbosa-Lima G, Vizzoni A, Cerbino-Neto J, Bozza FA, Souza TML, Trugilho MRO, de Filippis AMB, de Sequeira PC, Marques ETA, Magalhaes T, Díaz FJ, Restrepo BN, Marín K, Mattar S, Olson D, Asturias EJ, Lucera M, Singla M, Medigeshi GR, de Bosch N, Tam J, Gómez-Márquez J, Clavet C, Villar L, Hamad-Schifferli K, Gehrke L
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antigens, Viral, Chromatography, Affinity, Dengue Virus, Epitope Mapping, Humans, ROC Curve, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sequence Alignment, Serogroup, Zika Virus
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak demonstrates that cost-effective clinical diagnostics are urgently needed to detect and distinguish viral infections to improve patient care. Unlike dengue virus (DENV), ZIKV infections during pregnancy correlate with severe birth defects, including microcephaly and neurological disorders. Because ZIKV and DENV are related flaviviruses, their homologous proteins and nucleic acids can cause cross-reactions and false-positive results in molecular, antigenic, and serologic diagnostics. We report the characterization of monoclonal antibody pairs that have been translated into rapid immunochromatography tests to specifically detect the viral nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein antigen and distinguish the four DENV serotypes (DENV1-4) and ZIKV without cross-reaction. To complement visual test analysis and remove user subjectivity in reading test results, we used image processing and data analysis for data capture and test result quantification. Using a 30-μl serum sample, the sensitivity and specificity values of the DENV1-4 tests and the pan-DENV test, which detects all four dengue serotypes, ranged from 0.76 to 1.00. Sensitivity/specificity for the ZIKV rapid test was 0.81/0.86, respectively, using a 150-μl serum input. Serum ZIKV NS1 protein concentrations were about 10-fold lower than corresponding DENV NS1 concentrations in infected patients; moreover, ZIKV NS1 protein was not detected in polymerase chain reaction-positive patient urine samples. Our rapid immunochromatography approach and reagents have immediate application in differential clinical diagnosis of acute ZIKV and DENV cases, and the platform can be applied toward developing rapid antigen diagnostics for emerging viruses.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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MeSH Terms
Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope V2 apex confer protection against a clade C SHIV challenge.
Julg B, Tartaglia LJ, Keele BF, Wagh K, Pegu A, Sok D, Abbink P, Schmidt SD, Wang K, Chen X, Joyce MG, Georgiev IS, Choe M, Kwong PD, Doria-Rose NA, Le K, Louder MK, Bailer RT, Moore PL, Korber B, Seaman MS, Abdool Karim SS, Morris L, Koup RA, Mascola JR, Burton DR, Barouch DH
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Female, HIV Envelope Protein gp120, HIV-1, Macaca mulatta, Male, Neutralization Tests, Sequence Alignment, Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Simian Immunodeficiency Virus, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Neutralizing antibodies to the V2 apex antigenic region of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) trimer are among the most prevalent cross-reactive antibodies elicited by natural infection. Two recently described V2-specific antibodies, PGDM1400 and CAP256-VRC26.25, have demonstrated exquisite potency and neutralization breadth against HIV-1. However, little data exist on the protective efficacy of V2-specific neutralizing antibodies. We created a novel SHIV-325c viral stock that included a clade C HIV-1 envelope and was susceptible to neutralization by both of these antibodies. Rhesus macaques received a single infusion of either antibody at three different concentrations (2, 0.4, and 0.08 mg/kg) before challenge with SHIV-325c. PGDM1400 was fully protective at the 0.4 mg/kg dose, whereas CAP256-VRC26.25-LS was fully protective even at the 0.08 mg/kg dose, which correlated with its greater in vitro neutralization potency against the challenge virus. Serum antibody concentrations required for protection were <0.75 μg/ml for CAP256-VRC26.25-LS. These data demonstrate unprecedented potency and protective efficacy of V2-specific neutralizing antibodies in nonhuman primates and validate V2 as a potential target for the prevention of HIV-1 infection in passive immunization strategies in humans.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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14 MeSH Terms
Identification of Phosphorylation Codes for Arrestin Recruitment by G Protein-Coupled Receptors.
Zhou XE, He Y, de Waal PW, Gao X, Kang Y, Van Eps N, Yin Y, Pal K, Goswami D, White TA, Barty A, Latorraca NR, Chapman HN, Hubbell WL, Dror RO, Stevens RC, Cherezov V, Gurevich VV, Griffin PR, Ernst OP, Melcher K, Xu HE
(2017) Cell 170: 457-469.e13
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arrestins, Chromatography, Liquid, Humans, Mice, Models, Molecular, Phosphorylation, Rats, Rhodopsin, Sequence Alignment, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, X-Rays
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate diverse signaling in part through interaction with arrestins, whose binding promotes receptor internalization and signaling through G protein-independent pathways. High-affinity arrestin binding requires receptor phosphorylation, often at the receptor's C-terminal tail. Here, we report an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) crystal structure of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex, in which the phosphorylated C terminus of rhodopsin forms an extended intermolecular β sheet with the N-terminal β strands of arrestin. Phosphorylation was detected at rhodopsin C-terminal tail residues T336 and S338. These two phospho-residues, together with E341, form an extensive network of electrostatic interactions with three positively charged pockets in arrestin in a mode that resembles binding of the phosphorylated vasopressin-2 receptor tail to β-arrestin-1. Based on these observations, we derived and validated a set of phosphorylation codes that serve as a common mechanism for phosphorylation-dependent recruitment of arrestins by GPCRs.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
C-terminal motif of human neuropeptide Y receptor determines internalization and arrestin recruitment.
Wanka L, Babilon S, Burkert K, Mörl K, Gurevich VV, Beck-Sickinger AG
(2017) Cell Signal 29: 233-239
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Motifs, Amino Acid Sequence, Amino Acids, Animals, COS Cells, Chlorocebus aethiops, Endocytosis, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mutant Proteins, Receptors, Neuropeptide Y, Reproducibility of Results, Sequence Alignment, Sequence Deletion, Structure-Activity Relationship, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The human neuropeptide Y receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), which contributes to anorexigenic signals. Thus, this receptor is a highly interesting target for metabolic diseases. As GPCR internalization and trafficking affect receptor signaling and vice versa, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of hYR desensitization and endocytosis. The role of distinct segments of the hYR carboxyl terminus was investigated by fluorescence microscopy, binding assays, inositol turnover experiments and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to examine the internalization behavior of hYR and its interaction with arrestin-3. Based on results of C-terminal deletion mutants and substitution of single amino acids, the motif EESEHLPLSTVHTEVSKGS was identified, with glutamate, threonine and serine residues playing key roles, based on site-directed mutagenesis. Thus, we identified the internalization motif for the human neuropeptide Y receptor, which regulates arrestin-3 recruitment and receptor endocytosis.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Structures of Ebola virus GP and sGP in complex with therapeutic antibodies.
Pallesen J, Murin CD, de Val N, Cottrell CA, Hastie KM, Turner HL, Fusco ML, Flyak AI, Zeitlin L, Crowe JE, Andersen KG, Saphire EO, Ward AB
(2016) Nat Microbiol 1: 16128
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibody Formation, Cross Reactions, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Ebolavirus, Epitopes, Glycoproteins, Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Humans, Membrane Glycoproteins, Models, Structural, Mutation, Protein Multimerization, Sequence Alignment, Viral Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
The Ebola virus (EBOV) GP gene encodes two glycoproteins. The major product is a soluble, dimeric glycoprotein (sGP) that is secreted abundantly. Despite the abundance of sGP during infection, little is known regarding its structure or functional role. A minor product, resulting from transcriptional editing, is the transmembrane-anchored, trimeric viral surface glycoprotein (GP). GP mediates attachment to and entry into host cells, and is the intended target of antibody therapeutics. Because large portions of sequence are shared between GP and sGP, it has been hypothesized that sGP may potentially subvert the immune response or may contribute to pathogenicity. In this study, we present cryo-electron microscopy structures of GP and sGP in complex with GP-specific and GP/sGP cross-reactive antibodies undergoing human clinical trials. The structure of the sGP dimer presented here, in complex with both an sGP-specific antibody and a GP/sGP cross-reactive antibody, permits us to unambiguously assign the oligomeric arrangement of sGP and compare its structure and epitope presentation to those of GP. We also provide biophysical evaluation of naturally occurring GP/sGP mutations that fall within the footprints identified by our high-resolution structures. Taken together, our data provide a detailed and more complete picture of the accessible Ebolavirus glycoprotein landscape and a structural basis to evaluate patient and vaccine antibody responses towards differently structured products of the GP gene.
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16 MeSH Terms
A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.
Shen XX, Salichos L, Rokas A
(2016) Genome Biol Evol 8: 2565-80
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Composition, Genome, Fungal, Mammals, Phylogeny, Sequence Alignment, Yeasts
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal and could be useful in guiding the choice of phylogenetic markers.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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7 MeSH Terms