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Preoperative Belladonna and Opium Suppository for Ureteral Stent Pain: A Randomized, Double-blinded, Placebo-controlled Study.
Lee FC, Holt SK, Hsi RS, Haynes BM, Harper JD
(2017) Urology 100: 27-32
MeSH Terms: Adjuvants, Anesthesia, Adult, Aged, Analgesics, Opioid, Atropa belladonna, Atropine, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Opium, Pain, Postoperative, Parasympatholytics, Phytotherapy, Plant Extracts, Preoperative Care, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, Scopolamine, Stents, Suppositories, Ureteroscopy, Urinary Calculi
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate whether the use of a belladonna and opium (B&O) rectal suppository administered immediately before ureteroscopy (URS) and stent placement could reduce stent-related discomfort.
METHODS - A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was performed from August 2013 to December 2014. Seventy-one subjects were enrolled and randomized to receive a B&O (15 mg/30 mg) or a placebo suppository after induction of general anesthesia immediately before URS and stent placement. Baseline urinary symptoms were assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUASS). The Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire and AUASS were completed on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3, and after stent removal. Analgesic use intraoperatively, in the recovery unit, and at home was recorded.
RESULTS - Of the 71 subjects, 65 had treatment for ureteral (41%) and renal (61%) calculi, 4 for renal urothelial carcinoma, and 2 were excluded for no stent placed. By POD3, the B&O group reported a higher mean global quality of life (QOL) score (P = .04), a better mean quality of work score (P = .05), and less pain with urination (P = .03). The B&O group reported an improved AUASS QOL when comparing POD1 with post-stent removal (P = .04). There was no difference in analgesic use among groups (P = .67). There were no episodes of urinary retention. Age was associated with unplanned emergency visits (P <.00) and "high-pain" measure (P = .02) CONCLUSION: B&O suppository administered preoperatively improved QOL measures and reduced urinary-related pain after URS with stent. Younger age was associated with severe stent pain and unplanned hospital visits.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [(3)H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations.
Dean B, Hopper S, Conn PJ, Scarr E
(2016) Neuropsychopharmacology 41: 1620-8
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Cations, Divalent, Cerebral Cortex, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, N-Methylscopolamine, Pirenzepine, Quinolines, Receptor, Muscarinic M1, Receptors, Muscarinic, Schizophrenia
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [(3)H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg(2+) and enhanced by Zn(2+), whereas BQCA effects on [(3)H]NMS, but not [(3)H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia.
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13 MeSH Terms
Tamoxifen improves cholinergically modulated cognitive performance in postmenopausal women.
Newhouse P, Albert K, Astur R, Johnson J, Naylor M, Dumas J
(2013) Neuropsychopharmacology 38: 2632-43
MeSH Terms: Aged, Attention, Cholinergic Antagonists, Cognition Disorders, Estrogen Antagonists, Female, Humans, Mecamylamine, Memory, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Pain Measurement, Postmenopause, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Scopolamine, Tamoxifen, Time Factors, Verbal Learning
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
Tamoxifen (TMX) is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that is used as an estrogen receptor antagonist for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Whether TMX has antagonist activities in the human brain is less clear and its effects on cognitive function have not been experimentally explored. This study examined how TMX affected cognitive performance in older women using a model of anticholinergic drug-induced cognitive dysfunction. Twenty-one postmenopausal women were administered 20 mg of oral TMX or placebo for 3 months. Participants then took part in five drug challenges using the anticholinergic antinicotinic agent mecamylamine (MECA) and antimuscarinic agent scopolamine (SCOP) and were tested on a comprehensive battery including tasks of attention and psychomotor function, verbal episodic memory, and spatial navigation. After a 3-month placebo washout, participants were then crossed over to the alternate treatment and repeated the drug challenges after 3 months. Compared with placebo treatment, TMX significantly attenuated the impairment from cholinergic blockade on tasks of verbal episodic memory and spatial navigation, but effects on attentional/psychomotor tasks were more variable. Analysis by APOE genotype showed that APO ɛ4+ women showed a greater beneficial effect of TMX on reversing the cholinergic impairment than APO ɛ4- women on most tasks. This study provides evidence that TMX may act as an estrogen-like agonist to enhance cholinergic system activity and hippocampally mediated learning.
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18 MeSH Terms
Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal activity during episodic memory encoding in postmenopausal women: a pilot study.
Dumas JA, McDonald BC, Saykin AJ, McAllister TW, Hynes ML, West JD, Newhouse PA
(2010) Menopause 17: 852-9
MeSH Terms: Aged, Brain, Brain Mapping, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mecamylamine, Memory, Middle Aged, Muscarinic Antagonists, Neuropsychological Tests, Nicotinic Antagonists, Pilot Projects, Postmenopause, Scopolamine
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVE - The cholinergic system has been shown to modulate estrogen effects on cognitive performance in postmenopausal women. In an effort to further understand cholinergic contributions to cognition after menopause, this pilot study investigated the effects of two receptor-specific anticholinergic drugs on brain activation and episodic memory encoding in postmenopausal women not taking estrogen.
METHODS - Six healthy postmenopausal women took part in three drug challenges using the antimuscarinic drug scopolamine (2.5 microg/kg IV), the antinicotinic drug mecamylamine (20 mg PO), and placebo. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants performed a visual-verbal continuous recognition memory test that allowed for the separation of encoding and recognition processes.
RESULTS - Functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed greater hippocampal and frontal activation and less occipital activation during encoding relative to retrieval conditions. This pattern of activation was similar under both drug challenges.
CONCLUSIONS - These results suggest that the changes in the cholinergic system may, in part, be responsible for menopause-related increases in brain activation.
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Ascorbic acid attenuates scopolamine-induced spatial learning deficits in the water maze.
Harrison FE, Hosseini AH, Dawes SM, Weaver S, May JM
(2009) Behav Brain Res 205: 550-8
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholinesterase, Animals, Ascorbic Acid, Cerebral Cortex, Corpus Striatum, Escape Reaction, Female, Learning Disabilities, Liver, Locomotion, Male, Maze Learning, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Nootropic Agents, Prosencephalon, Scopolamine, Space Perception, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Vitamin C (ascorbate) has important antioxidant functions that can help protect against oxidative stress in the brain and damage associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. When administered parenterally ascorbate can bypass saturable uptake mechanisms in the gut and thus higher tissue concentrations can be achieved than by oral administration. In the present study we show that ascorbate (125 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1-h before testing, partially attenuated scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg i.p.) cognitive deficits in Morris water maze performance in young mice. Cumulative search error, but not escape latency nor path length, was significantly improved during acquisition in ascorbate plus scopolamine-treated mice although performance did not equal that of control mice. During the probe trial, scopolamine led to increased search error and chance level of time spent in the platform quadrant, whereas mice pre-treated with ascorbate prior to scopolamine did not differ from control mice on these measures. Ascorbate had no effect on unimpaired, control mice and neither did it reduce the peripheral, activity-increasing effects of scopolamine. Ascorbate alone increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the medial forebrain area but had no effect in cortex or striatum. This change, and its action against the amnestic effects of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, suggest that ascorbate may be acting in part via altered cholinergic signaling. However, further investigation is necessary to isolate the cognition-enhancing effects of ascorbate.
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19 MeSH Terms
Nicotinic versus muscarinic blockade alters verbal working memory-related brain activity in older women.
Dumas JA, Saykin AJ, McDonald BC, McAllister TW, Hynes ML, Newhouse PA
(2008) Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 16: 272-82
MeSH Terms: Aged, Brain, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mecamylamine, Memory, Middle Aged, Muscarinic Antagonists, Nicotinic Antagonists, Postmenopause, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Scopolamine, Speech
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVES - An important aspect of furthering our understanding of the central nervous system function after menopause is to examine the cerebral circuitry that appears to be influenced by cholinergic antagonist drugs in the presence and absence of estrogen. This pilot study investigated the effects of two anticholinergic drugs on brain activation and working memory performance in postmenopausal women not taking estrogen. This approach simulates the effects of age- or disease-related neuroreceptor or neuronal loss by temporarily blocking pre- and postsynaptic muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.
DESIGN - Six healthy postmenopausal women took part in three drug challenges using the antinicotinic drug mecamylamine (MECA, 20 mg, oral), the antimuscarinic drug scopolamine (SCOP, 2.5 microg/kg, i.v.), and placebo during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The cognitive measure was a visually presented verbal N-back test of working memory.
RESULTS - Neither MECA nor SCOP significantly impaired performance on the verbal N-back. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed greater increases in frontal lobe activation in the placebo condition relative to each drug condition with different specific regional activation for MECA and SCOP.
CONCLUSIONS - These preliminary results suggest that brain activation patterns are sensitive to cholinergic modulation in postmenopausal women and that differential effects may be observed following nicotinic versus muscarinic blockade. This approach offers a potentially valuable method for modeling age-related changes in brain function, and the findings may have implications for cholinergic contributions to normal and pathologic aging.
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Estradiol interacts with the cholinergic system to affect verbal memory in postmenopausal women: evidence for the critical period hypothesis.
Dumas J, Hancur-Bucci C, Naylor M, Sites C, Newhouse P
(2008) Horm Behav 53: 159-69
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Analysis of Variance, Cholinergic Antagonists, Cognition, Critical Period, Psychological, Cross-Over Studies, Double-Blind Method, Estradiol, Female, Humans, Mecamylamine, Memory Disorders, Mental Recall, Middle Aged, Postmenopause, Scopolamine, Verbal Learning
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Estradiol has been shown to interact with the cholinergic system to affect cognition in postmenopausal women. This study further investigated the interaction of estradiol and cholinergic system functioning on verbal memory and attention in two groups of healthy younger (ages 50-62) and older (ages 70-81) postmenopausal women. Twenty-two postmenopausal women were randomly and blindly placed on 1 mg of 17-beta estradiol orally for 1 month then 2 mg for 2 months or matching placebo pills after which they participated in three anticholinergic challenge sessions when verbal memory and attention were assessed. Subjects were administered either the antimuscarinic drug scopolamine (SCOP), the antinicotinic drug mecamylamine (MECA), or placebo. After the first challenge phase, they were crossed over to the other hormone treatment for another 3 months and repeated the challenges. Results showed that estradiol pretreatment significantly attenuated the anticholinergic drug-induced impairments on a test of episodic memory (the Buschke Selective Reminding Task) for the younger group only, while estradiol treatment impaired performance of the older group. The results suggest that younger subjects may experience more cholinergic benefit from estradiol treatment than older subjects, supporting the concept of a critical period for postmenopausal estrogen use.
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Deficits in acetylcholine homeostasis, receptors and behaviors in choline transporter heterozygous mice.
Bazalakova MH, Wright J, Schneble EJ, McDonald MP, Heilman CJ, Levey AI, Blakely RD
(2007) Genes Brain Behav 6: 411-24
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholine, Animals, Anxiety, Brain, Cholinergic Agents, Exploratory Behavior, Hemicholinium 3, Heterozygote, Maze Learning, Membrane Transport Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Motor Activity, Receptors, Muscarinic, Rotarod Performance Test, Scopolamine, Spatial Behavior
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2013
Cholinergic neurons elaborate a hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive choline transporter (CHT) that mediates presynaptic, high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) in support of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release. Homozygous deletion of CHT (-/-) is lethal shortly after birth (Ferguson et al. 2004), consistent with CHT as an essential component of cholinergic signaling, but precluding functional analyses of CHT contributions in adult animals. In contrast, CHT+/- mice are viable, fertile and display normal levels of synaptosomal HACU, yet demonstrate reduced CHT protein and increased sensitivity to HC-3, suggestive of underlying cholinergic hypofunction. We find that CHT+/- mice are equivalent to CHT+/+ siblings on measures of motor co-ordination (rotarod), general activity (open field), anxiety (elevated plus maze, light/dark paradigms) and spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze). However, CHT+/- mice display impaired performance as a result of physical challenge in the treadmill paradigm, as well as reduced sensitivity to challenge with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine in the open field paradigm. These behavioral alterations are accompanied by significantly reduced brain ACh levels, elevated choline levels and brain region-specific decreased expression of M1 and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies suggest that CHT hemizygosity results in adequate baseline ACh stores, sufficient to sustain many phenotypes, but normal sensitivities to physical and/or pharmacological challenge require full cholinergic signaling capacity.
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18 MeSH Terms
Intrahippocampal scopolamine impairs both acquisition and consolidation of contextual fear conditioning.
Wallenstein GV, Vago DR
(2001) Neurobiol Learn Mem 75: 245-52
MeSH Terms: Animals, Conditioning, Classical, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fear, Female, Hippocampus, Learning, Memory, Muscarinic Antagonists, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Muscarinic, Scopolamine
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2020
Lesions of the dorsal hippocampus have been shown to disrupt both the acquisition and the consolidation of memories associated with contextual fear (fear of the place of conditioning), but do not affect fear conditioning to discrete cues (e.g., a tone). Blockade of central muscarinic cholinergic receptor activation results in selective acquisition deficits of contextual fear conditioning, but reportedly has little effect on consolidation. Here we show for the first time that direct infusion of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, into the dorsal hippocampus produces a dose-dependent deficit in both acquisition and consolidation of contextual fear conditioning, while having no impact on simple tone conditioning.
Copyright 2001 Academic Press.
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MeSH Terms
Cholestatic jaundice with skin desquamation in a 12-year-old girl.
Stutts JT, Washington K, Barnard JA
(1999) J Pediatr 134: 649-53
MeSH Terms: Atropine, Child, Cholestasis, Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia, Drug Combinations, Fatal Outcome, Female, Humans, Liver Cirrhosis, Phenobarbital, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult, Scopolamine, Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome
Added March 5, 2014
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14 MeSH Terms