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Coronaviruses induce entry-independent, continuous macropinocytosis.
Freeman MC, Peek CT, Becker MM, Smith EC, Denison MR
(2014) mBio 5: e01340-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Coronavirus, Mice, Pinocytosis, Pseudopodia, SARS Virus, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Macropinocytosis is exploited by many pathogens for entry into cells. Coronaviruses (CoVs) such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV are important human pathogens; however, macropinocytosis during CoV infection has not been investigated. We demonstrate that the CoVs SARS CoV and murine hepatitis virus (MHV) induce macropinocytosis, which occurs late during infection, is continuous, and is not associated with virus entry. MHV-induced macropinocytosis results in vesicle internalization, as well as extended filopodia capable of fusing with distant cells. MHV-induced macropinocytosis requires fusogenic spike protein on the cell surface and is dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor activation. Inhibition of macropinocytosis reduces supernatant viral titers and syncytia but not intracellular virus titers. These results indicate that macropinocytosis likely facilitates CoV infection through enhanced cell-to-cell spreading. Our studies are the first to demonstrate virus use of macropinocytosis for a role other than entry and suggest a much broader potential exploitation of macropinocytosis in virus replication and host interactions. Importance: Coronaviruses (CoVs), including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV, are critical emerging human pathogens. Macropinocytosis is induced by many pathogens to enter host cells, but other functions for macropinocytosis in virus replication are unknown. In this work, we show that CoVs induce a macropinocytosis late in infection that is continuous, independent from cell entry, and associated with increased virus titers and cell fusion. Murine hepatitis virus macropinocytosis requires a fusogenic virus spike protein and signals through the epidermal growth factor receptor and the classical macropinocytosis pathway. These studies demonstrate CoV induction of macropinocytosis for a purpose other than entry and indicate that viruses likely exploit macropinocytosis at multiple steps in replication and pathogenesis.
Copyright © 2014 Freeman et al.
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8 MeSH Terms
Discovery, synthesis, and structure-based optimization of a series of N-(tert-butyl)-2-(N-arylamido)-2-(pyridin-3-yl) acetamides (ML188) as potent noncovalent small molecule inhibitors of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3CL protease.
Jacobs J, Grum-Tokars V, Zhou Y, Turlington M, Saldanha SA, Chase P, Eggler A, Dawson ES, Baez-Santos YM, Tomar S, Mielech AM, Baker SC, Lindsley CW, Hodder P, Mesecar A, Stauffer SR
(2013) J Med Chem 56: 534-46
MeSH Terms: Acetamides, Drug Discovery, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Molecular, Molecular Structure, Protease Inhibitors, SARS Virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Small Molecule Libraries, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
A high-throughput screen of the NIH molecular libraries sample collection and subsequent optimization of a lead dipeptide-like series of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) main protease (3CLpro) inhibitors led to the identification of probe compound ML188 (16-(R), (R)-N-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-N-(2-(tert-butylamino)-2-oxo-1-(pyridin-3-yl)ethyl)furan-2-carboxamide, Pubchem CID: 46897844). Unlike the majority of reported coronavirus 3CLpro inhibitors that act via covalent modification of the enzyme, 16-(R) is a noncovalent SARS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitor with moderate MW and good enzyme and antiviral inhibitory activity. A multicomponent Ugi reaction was utilized to rapidly explore structure-activity relationships within S(1'), S(1), and S(2) enzyme binding pockets. The X-ray structure of SARS-CoV 3CLpro bound with 16-(R) was instrumental in guiding subsequent rounds of chemistry optimization. 16-(R) provides an excellent starting point for the further design and refinement of 3CLpro inhibitors that act by a noncovalent mechanism of action.
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10 MeSH Terms
A live, impaired-fidelity coronavirus vaccine protects in an aged, immunocompromised mouse model of lethal disease.
Graham RL, Becker MM, Eckerle LD, Bolles M, Denison MR, Baric RS
(2012) Nat Med 18: 1820-6
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Base Sequence, DNA Primers, Drug Design, Exoribonucleases, Female, Immunocompromised Host, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Molecular Sequence Data, Plasmids, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, SARS Virus, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Statistics, Nonparametric, Viral Vaccines, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Live, attenuated RNA virus vaccines are efficacious but subject to reversion to virulence. Among RNA viruses, replication fidelity is recognized as a key determinant of virulence and escape from antiviral therapy; increased fidelity is attenuating for some viruses. Coronavirus (CoV) replication fidelity is approximately 20-fold greater than that of other RNA viruses and is mediated by a 3'→5' exonuclease (ExoN) activity that probably functions in RNA proofreading. In this study we demonstrate that engineered inactivation of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV ExoN activity results in a stable mutator phenotype with profoundly decreased fidelity in vivo and attenuation of pathogenesis in young, aged and immunocompromised mice. The ExoN inactivation genotype and mutator phenotype are stable and do not revert to virulence, even after serial passage or long-term persistent infection in vivo. ExoN inactivation has potential for broad applications in the stable attenuation of CoVs and, perhaps, other RNA viruses.
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19 MeSH Terms
Distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction of filoviruses, SARS coronavirus, and influenza A virus.
Huang IC, Bailey CC, Weyer JL, Radoshitzky SR, Becker MM, Chiang JJ, Brass AL, Ahmed AA, Chi X, Dong L, Longobardi LE, Boltz D, Kuhn JH, Elledge SJ, Bavari S, Denison MR, Choe H, Farzan M
(2011) PLoS Pathog 7: e1001258
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Differentiation, Cell Line, Tumor, Chlorocebus aethiops, Endothelium, Vascular, Female, Filoviridae, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Influenza A virus, Mice, SARS Virus, Vero Cells, Virus Diseases, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins 1, 2, and 3 (IFITM1, 2, and 3) are recently identified viral restriction factors that inhibit infection mediated by the influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Here we show that IFITM proteins restricted infection mediated by the entry glycoproteins (GP(1,2)) of Marburg and Ebola filoviruses (MARV, EBOV). Consistent with these observations, interferon-β specifically restricted filovirus and IAV entry processes. IFITM proteins also inhibited replication of infectious MARV and EBOV. We observed distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction: compared with IAV, the entry processes of MARV and EBOV were less restricted by IFITM3, but more restricted by IFITM1. Moreover, murine Ifitm5 and 6 did not restrict IAV, but efficiently inhibited filovirus entry. We further demonstrate that replication of infectious SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and entry mediated by the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein are restricted by IFITM proteins. The profile of IFITM-mediated restriction of SARS-CoV was more similar to that of filoviruses than to IAV. Trypsin treatment of receptor-associated SARS-CoV pseudovirions, which bypasses their dependence on lysosomal cathepsin L, also bypassed IFITM-mediated restriction. However, IFITM proteins did not reduce cellular cathepsin activity or limit access of virions to acidic intracellular compartments. Our data indicate that IFITM-mediated restriction is localized to a late stage in the endocytic pathway. They further show that IFITM proteins differentially restrict the entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses, and modulate cellular tropism independently of viral receptor expression.
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16 MeSH Terms
Infidelity of SARS-CoV Nsp14-exonuclease mutant virus replication is revealed by complete genome sequencing.
Eckerle LD, Becker MM, Halpin RA, Li K, Venter E, Lu X, Scherbakova S, Graham RL, Baric RS, Stockwell TB, Spiro DJ, Denison MR
(2010) PLoS Pathog 6: e1000896
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Chlorocebus aethiops, Evolution, Molecular, Exoribonucleases, Genetic Engineering, Genetic Variation, Genome, Viral, Models, Genetic, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, SARS Virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Vero Cells, Viral Nonstructural Proteins, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added August 16, 2012
Most RNA viruses lack the mechanisms to recognize and correct mutations that arise during genome replication, resulting in quasispecies diversity that is required for pathogenesis and adaptation. However, it is not known how viruses encoding large viral RNA genomes such as the Coronaviridae (26 to 32 kb) balance the requirements for genome stability and quasispecies diversity. Further, the limits of replication infidelity during replication of large RNA genomes and how decreased fidelity impacts virus fitness over time are not known. Our previous work demonstrated that genetic inactivation of the coronavirus exoribonuclease (ExoN) in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) of murine hepatitis virus results in a 15-fold decrease in replication fidelity. However, it is not known whether nsp14-ExoN is required for replication fidelity of all coronaviruses, nor the impact of decreased fidelity on genome diversity and fitness during replication and passage. We report here the engineering and recovery of nsp14-ExoN mutant viruses of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that have stable growth defects and demonstrate a 21-fold increase in mutation frequency during replication in culture. Analysis of complete genome sequences from SARS-ExoN mutant viral clones revealed unique mutation sets in every genome examined from the same round of replication and a total of 100 unique mutations across the genome. Using novel bioinformatic tools and deep sequencing across the full-length genome following 10 population passages in vitro, we demonstrate retention of ExoN mutations and continued increased diversity and mutational load compared to wild-type SARS-CoV. The results define a novel genetic and bioinformatics model for introduction and identification of multi-allelic mutations in replication competent viruses that will be powerful tools for testing the effects of decreased fidelity and increased quasispecies diversity on viral replication, pathogenesis, and evolution.
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18 MeSH Terms
Synthetic recombinant bat SARS-like coronavirus is infectious in cultured cells and in mice.
Becker MM, Graham RL, Donaldson EF, Rockx B, Sims AC, Sheahan T, Pickles RJ, Corti D, Johnston RE, Baric RS, Denison MR
(2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105: 19944-9
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Chiroptera, Chlorocebus aethiops, Female, Humans, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Molecular Sequence Data, Recombinant Proteins, Recombination, Genetic, Respiratory Mucosa, SARS Virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins, Virus Replication, Zoonoses
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Defining prospective pathways by which zoonoses evolve and emerge as human pathogens is critical for anticipating and controlling both natural and deliberate pandemics. However, predicting tenable pathways of animal-to-human movement has been hindered by challenges in identifying reservoir species, cultivating zoonotic organisms in culture, and isolating full-length genomes for cloning and genetic studies. The ability to design and recover pathogens reconstituted from synthesized cDNAs has the potential to overcome these obstacles by allowing studies of replication and pathogenesis without identification of reservoir species or cultivation of primary isolates. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and recovery of the largest synthetic replicating life form, a 29.7-kb bat severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like coronavirus (Bat-SCoV), a likely progenitor to the SARS-CoV epidemic. To test a possible route of emergence from the noncultivable Bat-SCoV to human SARS-CoV, we designed a consensus Bat-SCoV genome and replaced the Bat-SCoV Spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) with the SARS-CoV RBD (Bat-SRBD). Bat-SRBD was infectious in cell culture and in mice and was efficiently neutralized by antibodies specific for both bat and human CoV Spike proteins. Rational design, synthesis, and recovery of hypothetical recombinant viruses can be used to investigate mechanisms of transspecies movement of zoonoses and has great potential to aid in rapid public health responses to known or predicted emerging microbial threats.
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21 MeSH Terms
SARS coronavirus replicase proteins in pathogenesis.
Graham RL, Sparks JS, Eckerle LD, Sims AC, Denison MR
(2008) Virus Res 133: 88-100
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chlorocebus aethiops, Humans, Open Reading Frames, RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase, SARS Virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Vero Cells, Viral Nonstructural Proteins, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Much progress has been made in understanding the role of structural and accessory proteins in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infections. The SARS epidemic also brought new attention to the proteins translated from ORF1a and ORF1b of the input genome RNA, also known as the replicase/transcriptase gene. Evidence for change within the ORF1ab coding sequence during the SARS epidemic, as well as evidence from studies with other coronaviruses, indicates that it is likely that the ORF1ab proteins play roles in virus pathogenesis distinct from or in addition to functions directly involved in viral replication. Recent reverse genetic studies have confirmed that proteins of ORF1ab may be involved in cellular signaling and modification of cellular gene expression, as well as virulence by mechanisms yet to be determined. Thus, the evolution of the ORF1ab proteins may be determined as much by issues of host range and virulence as they are by specific requirements for intracellular replication.
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10 MeSH Terms
The nsp2 proteins of mouse hepatitis virus and SARS coronavirus are dispensable for viral replication.
Graham RL, Sims AC, Baric RS, Denison MR
(2006) Adv Exp Med Biol 581: 67-72
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Cysteine Endopeptidases, Gene Deletion, Genome, Viral, Microscopy, Confocal, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Murine hepatitis virus, Open Reading Frames, Polyproteins, SARS Virus, Species Specificity, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
The results presented here demonstrate that the MHV and SARS-CoV nsp2 proteins are not required for the production of infectious virus, for polyprotein expression or processing, or for viral replication complex formation in cell culture. The nsp2 protein domain resides in a region of the coronavirus replicase that is relatively nonconserved across coronaviruses. In fact, the size and amino acid sequence variability of nsp2 across the different coronaviruses has led some investigators to speculate that the nsp2 protein, along with the nsp1 and nsp3 proteins, may play host- and/or cell-specific roles in the virus life cycle. While this may be the case, it should be noted that nsp2, in some form, exists in all coronaviruses studied to date and likely plays a pivotal role in the viral life cycle. A previous study from our laboratory identified a coronavirus replicase protein that plays an important role in viral pathogenesis. Such may prove to be the case for nsp2, as well. Alternatively, beacuse nsp2 exists as a detectable precursor protein nsp2-3 prior to processing of nsp2 and nsp3 into mature proteins, nsp2 may play a critical adaptor/regulatory role for nsp3 function. Importantly, the viruses produced in this study provide a system by which the role of the nsp2 protein in viral infection can be characterized.
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13 MeSH Terms
SARS coronavirus, but not human coronavirus NL63, utilizes cathepsin L to infect ACE2-expressing cells.
Huang IC, Bosch BJ, Li F, Li W, Lee KH, Ghiran S, Vasilieva N, Dermody TS, Harrison SC, Dormitzer PR, Farzan M, Rottier PJ, Choe H
(2006) J Biol Chem 281: 3198-203
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2, Animals, Carboxypeptidases, Cathepsin L, Cathepsins, Cell Line, Chlorocebus aethiops, Coronavirus, Cysteine Endopeptidases, Endosomes, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Humans, Lysosomes, Membrane Glycoproteins, Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A, Retroviridae, SARS Virus, Species Specificity, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Viruses require specific cellular receptors to infect their target cells. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a cellular receptor for two divergent coronaviruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63). In addition to hostcell receptors, lysosomal cysteine proteases are required for productive infection by some viruses. Here we show that SARS-CoV, but not HCoV-NL63, utilizes the enzymatic activity of the cysteine protease cathepsin L to infect ACE2-expressing cells. Inhibitors of cathepsin L blocked infection by SARS-CoV and by a retrovirus pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein but not infection by HCoV-NL63 or a retrovirus pseudotyped with the HCoV-NL63 S protein. Expression of exogenous cathepsin L substantially enhanced infection mediated by the SARS-CoV S protein and by filovirus GP proteins but not by the HCoV-NL63 S protein or the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Finally, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification had substantially less effect on infection mediated by the HCoV-NL63 S protein than on that mediated by the SARS-CoV S protein. Our data indicate that two coronaviruses that utilize a common receptor nonetheless enter cells through distinct mechanisms.
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20 MeSH Terms
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus group-specific open reading frames encode nonessential functions for replication in cell cultures and mice.
Yount B, Roberts RS, Sims AC, Deming D, Frieman MB, Sparks J, Denison MR, Davis N, Baric RS
(2005) J Virol 79: 14909-22
MeSH Terms: Animals, Coronavirus Infections, Mice, Open Reading Frames, SARS Virus, Viral Proteins, Viral Structural Proteins, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) encodes several unique group-specific open reading frames (ORFs) relative to other known coronaviruses. To determine the significance of the SARS-CoV group-specific ORFs in virus replication in vitro and in mice, we systematically deleted five of the eight group-specific ORFs, ORF3a, OF3b, ORF6, ORF7a, and ORF7b, and characterized recombinant virus replication and gene expression in vitro. Deletion of the group-specific ORFs of SARS-CoV, either alone or in various combinations, did not dramatically influence replication efficiency in cell culture or in the levels of viral RNA synthesis. The greatest reduction in virus growth was noted following ORF3a deletion. SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein does not encode a rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER)/Golgi retention signal, and it has been suggested that ORF3a interacts with and targets S glycoprotein retention in the rER/Golgi apparatus. Deletion of ORF3a did not alter subcellular localization of the S glycoprotein from distinct punctuate localization in the rER/Golgi apparatus. These data suggest that ORF3a plays little role in the targeting of S localization in the rER/Golgi apparatus. In addition, insertion of the 29-bp deletion fusing ORF8a/b into the single ORF8, noted in early-stage SARS-CoV human and civet cat isolates, had little if any impact on in vitro growth or RNA synthesis. All recombinant viruses replicated to wild-type levels in the murine model, suggesting that either the group-specific ORFs play little role in in vivo replication efficiency or that the mouse model is not of sufficient quality for discerning the role of the group-specific ORFs in disease origin and development.
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8 MeSH Terms