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Glycine -methyltransferase deletion in mice diverts carbon flux from gluconeogenesis to pathways that utilize excess methionine cycle intermediates.
Hughey CC, Trefts E, Bracy DP, James FD, Donahue EP, Wasserman DH
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 11944-11954
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carbon, Citric Acid Cycle, Energy Metabolism, Fatty Liver, Gene Deletion, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Liver, Male, Metabolic Flux Analysis, Methionine, Mice, Mice, Knockout, S-Adenosylmethionine
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Glycine -methyltransferase (GNMT) is the most abundant liver methyltransferase regulating the availability of the biological methyl donor, -adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, GNMT has been identified to be down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite its role in regulating SAM levels and association of its down-regulation with liver tumorigenesis, the impact of reduced GNMT on metabolic reprogramming before the manifestation of HCC has not been investigated in detail. Herein, we used H/C metabolic flux analysis in conscious, unrestrained mice to test the hypothesis that the absence of GNMT causes metabolic reprogramming. GNMT-null (KO) mice displayed a reduction in blood glucose that was associated with a decline in both hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The reduced gluconeogenesis was due to a decrease in liver gluconeogenic precursors, citric acid cycle fluxes, and anaplerosis and cataplerosis. A concurrent elevation in both hepatic SAM and metabolites of SAM utilization pathways was observed in the KO mice. Specifically, the increase in metabolites of SAM utilization pathways indicated that hepatic polyamine synthesis and catabolism, transsulfuration, and lipogenesis pathways were increased in the KO mice. Of note, these pathways utilize substrates that could otherwise be used for gluconeogenesis. Also, this metabolic reprogramming occurs before the well-documented appearance of HCC in GNMT-null mice. Together, these results indicate that GNMT deletion promotes a metabolic shift whereby nutrients are channeled away from glucose formation toward pathways that utilize the elevated SAM.
© 2018 Hughey et al.
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MeSH Terms
S-Adenosylmethionine increases circulating very-low density lipoprotein clearance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Martínez-Uña M, Varela-Rey M, Mestre D, Fernández-Ares L, Fresnedo O, Fernandez-Ramos D, Gutiérrez-de Juan V, Martin-Guerrero I, García-Orad A, Luka Z, Wagner C, Lu SC, García-Monzón C, Finnell RH, Aurrekoetxea I, Buqué X, Martínez-Chantar ML, Mato JM, Aspichueta P
(2015) J Hepatol 62: 673-81
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, Lipoproteins, VLDL, Liver, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Models, Biological, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Perilipin-2, S-Adenosylmethionine, Triglycerides, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) export lipids from the liver to peripheral tissues and are the precursors of low-density-lipoproteins. Low levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) decrease triglyceride (TG) secretion in VLDLs, contributing to hepatosteatosis in methionine adenosyltransferase 1A knockout mice but nothing is known about the effect of SAMe on the circulating VLDL metabolism. We wanted to investigate whether excess SAMe could disrupt VLDL plasma metabolism and unravel the mechanisms involved.
METHODS - Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) knockout (KO) mice, GNMT and perilipin-2 (PLIN2) double KO (GNMT-PLIN2-KO) and their respective wild type (WT) controls were used. A high fat diet (HFD) or a methionine deficient diet (MDD) was administrated to exacerbate or recover VLDL metabolism, respectively. Finally, 33 patients with non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD); 11 with hypertriglyceridemia and 22 with normal lipidemia were used in this study.
RESULTS - We found that excess SAMe increases the turnover of hepatic TG stores for secretion in VLDL in GNMT-KO mice, a model of NAFLD with high SAMe levels. The disrupted VLDL assembly resulted in the secretion of enlarged, phosphatidylethanolamine-poor, TG- and apoE-enriched VLDL-particles; special features that lead to increased VLDL clearance and decreased serum TG levels. Re-establishing normal SAMe levels restored VLDL secretion, features and metabolism. In NAFLD patients, serum TG levels were lower when hepatic GNMT-protein expression was decreased.
CONCLUSIONS - Excess hepatic SAMe levels disrupt VLDL assembly and features and increase circulating VLDL clearance, which will cause increased VLDL-lipid supply to tissues and might contribute to the extrahepatic complications of NAFLD.
Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Glycine N-methyltransferase expression in the hippocampus and its role in neurogenesis and cognitive performance.
Carrasco M, Rabaneda LG, Murillo-Carretero M, Ortega-Martínez S, Martínez-Chantar ML, Woodhoo A, Luka Z, Wagner C, Lu SC, Mato JM, Micó JA, Castro C
(2014) Hippocampus 24: 840-52
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors, Animals, Cognition, Cyclin E, Fibroblast Growth Factor 2, Gene Expression Regulation, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Hippocampus, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Maze Learning, Memory Disorders, Methionine, Methionine Adenosyltransferase, Methylation, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurogenesis, Neuronal Plasticity, Rotarod Performance Test, S-Adenosylmethionine
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
The hippocampus is a brain area characterized by its high plasticity, observed at all levels of organization: molecular, synaptic, and cellular, the latter referring to the capacity of neural precursors within the hippocampus to give rise to new neurons throughout life. Recent findings suggest that promoter methylation is a plastic process subjected to regulation, and this plasticity seems to be particularly important for hippocampal neurogenesis. We have detected the enzyme GNMT (a liver metabolic enzyme) in the hippocampus. GNMT regulates intracellular levels of SAMe, which is a universal methyl donor implied in almost all methylation reactions and, thus, of prime importance for DNA methylation. In addition, we show that deficiency of this enzyme in mice (Gnmt-/-) results in high SAMe levels within the hippocampus, reduced neurogenic capacity, and spatial learning and memory impairment. In vitro, SAMe inhibited neural precursor cell division in a concentration-dependent manner, but only when proliferation signals were triggered by bFGF. Indeed, SAMe inhibited the bFGF-stimulated MAP kinase signaling cascade, resulting in decreased cyclin E expression. These results suggest that alterations in the concentration of SAMe impair neurogenesis and contribute to cognitive decline.
© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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22 MeSH Terms
S-adenosylmethionine levels regulate the schwann cell DNA methylome.
Varela-Rey M, Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta M, Lozano JJ, Aransay AM, Fernandez AF, Lavin JL, Mósen-Ansorena D, Berdasco M, Turmaine M, Luka Z, Wagner C, Lu SC, Esteller M, Mirsky R, Jessen KR, Fraga MF, Martínez-Chantar ML, Mato JM, Woodhoo A
(2014) Neuron 81: 1024-1039
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Division, DNA Methylation, Female, Genomics, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Obese, Myelin Sheath, Peripheral Nerves, Primary Cell Culture, Rats, S-Adenosylmethionine, Schwann Cells
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Axonal myelination is essential for rapid saltatory impulse conduction in the nervous system, and malformation or destruction of myelin sheaths leads to motor and sensory disabilities. DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification during mammalian development, yet its role in myelination remains obscure. Here, using high-resolution methylome maps, we show that DNA methylation could play a key gene regulatory role in peripheral nerve myelination and that S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal methyl donor in cytosine methylation, regulates the methylome dynamics during this process. Our studies also point to a possible role of SAMe in establishing the aberrant DNA methylation patterns in a mouse model of diabetic neuropathy, implicating SAMe in the pathogenesis of this disease. These critical observations establish a link between SAMe and DNA methylation status in a defined biological system, providing a mechanism that could direct methylation changes during cellular differentiation and in diverse pathological situations.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Excess S-adenosylmethionine reroutes phosphatidylethanolamine towards phosphatidylcholine and triglyceride synthesis.
Martínez-Uña M, Varela-Rey M, Cano A, Fernández-Ares L, Beraza N, Aurrekoetxea I, Martínez-Arranz I, García-Rodríguez JL, Buqué X, Mestre D, Luka Z, Wagner C, Alonso C, Finnell RH, Lu SC, Martínez-Chantar ML, Aspichueta P, Mato JM
(2013) Hepatology 58: 1296-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Fatty Liver, Female, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Perilipin-2, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphatidylethanolamines, S-Adenosylmethionine, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
UNLABELLED - Methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) and glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) are the primary genes involved in hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) synthesis and degradation, respectively. Mat1a ablation in mice induces a decrease in hepatic SAMe, activation of lipogenesis, inhibition of triglyceride (TG) release, and steatosis. Gnmt-deficient mice, despite showing a large increase in hepatic SAMe, also develop steatosis. We hypothesized that as an adaptive response to hepatic SAMe accumulation, phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis by way of the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway is stimulated in Gnmt(-/-) mice. We also propose that the excess PC thus generated is catabolized, leading to TG synthesis and steatosis by way of diglyceride (DG) generation. We observed that Gnmt(-/-) mice present with normal hepatic lipogenesis and increased TG release. We also observed that the flux from PE to PC is stimulated in the liver of Gnmt(-/-) mice and that this results in a reduction in PE content and a marked increase in DG and TG. Conversely, reduction of hepatic SAMe following the administration of a methionine-deficient diet reverted the flux from PE to PC of Gnmt(-/-) mice to that of wildtype animals and normalized DG and TG content preventing the development of steatosis. Gnmt(-/-) mice with an additional deletion of perilipin2, the predominant lipid droplet protein, maintain high SAMe levels, with a concurrent increased flux from PE to PC, but do not develop liver steatosis.
CONCLUSION - These findings indicate that excess SAMe reroutes PE towards PC and TG synthesis and lipid sequestration.
Copyright © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
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17 MeSH Terms
Two patients with hepatic mtDNA depletion syndromes and marked elevations of S-adenosylmethionine and methionine.
Mudd SH, Wagner C, Luka Z, Stabler SP, Allen RH, Schroer R, Wood T, Wang J, Wong LJ
(2012) Mol Genet Metab 105: 228-36
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Base Sequence, DNA, Mitochondrial, Exons, Female, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, Infant, Liver, Male, Membrane Proteins, Methionine, Mitochondrial Diseases, Mitochondrial Proteins, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, S-Adenosylmethionine, Sequence Deletion
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
This paper reports studies of two patients proven by a variety of studies to have mitochondrial depletion syndromes due to mutations in either their MPV17 or DGUOK genes. Each was initially investigated metabolically because of plasma methionine concentrations as high as 15-21-fold above the upper limit of the reference range, then found also to have plasma levels of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) 4.4-8.6-fold above the upper limit of the reference range. Assays of S-adenosylhomocysteine, total homocysteine, cystathionine, sarcosine, and other relevant metabolites and studies of their gene encoding glycine N-methyltransferase produced evidence suggesting they had none of the known causes of elevated methionine with or without elevated AdoMet. Patient 1 grew slowly and intermittently, but was cognitively normal. At age 7 years he was found to have hepatocellular carcinoma, underwent a liver transplant and died of progressive liver and renal failure at age almost 9 years. Patient 2 had a clinical course typical of DGUOK deficiency and died at age 8 ½ months. Although each patient had liver abnormalities, evidence is presented that such abnormalities are very unlikely to explain their elevations of AdoMet or the extent of their hypermethioninemias. A working hypothesis is presented suggesting that with mitochondrial depletion the normal usage of AdoMet by mitochondria is impaired, AdoMet accumulates in the cytoplasm of affected cells poor in glycine N-methyltransferase activity, the accumulated AdoMet causes methionine to accumulate by inhibiting activity of methionine adenosyltransferase II, and that both AdoMet and methionine consequently leak abnormally into the plasma.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Some more comments on 'folate deficiency in chronic pancreatitis'.
Wagner C
(2010) JOP 11: 646-7; author reply 651-3
MeSH Terms: Folic Acid Deficiency, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Homocysteine, Humans, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Methionine, Pancreatitis, Chronic, S-Adenosylhomocysteine, S-Adenosylmethionine
Added January 20, 2015
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9 MeSH Terms
Fatty liver and fibrosis in glycine N-methyltransferase knockout mice is prevented by nicotinamide.
Varela-Rey M, Martínez-López N, Fernández-Ramos D, Embade N, Calvisi DF, Woodhoo A, Rodríguez J, Fraga MF, Julve J, Rodríguez-Millán E, Frades I, Torres L, Luka Z, Wagner C, Esteller M, Lu SC, Martínez-Chantar ML, Mato JM
(2010) Hepatology 52: 105-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Fatty Liver, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Liver Cirrhosis, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Niacinamide, S-Adenosylmethionine
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
UNLABELLED - Deletion of glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), the main gene involved in liver S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) catabolism, leads to the hepatic accumulation of this molecule and the development of fatty liver and fibrosis in mice. To demonstrate that the excess of hepatic SAM is the main agent contributing to liver disease in GNMT knockout (KO) mice, we treated 1.5-month-old GNMT-KO mice for 6 weeks with nicotinamide (NAM), a substrate of the enzyme NAM N-methyltransferase. NAM administration markedly reduced hepatic SAM content, prevented DNA hypermethylation, and normalized the expression of critical genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. More importantly, NAM treatment prevented the development of fatty liver and fibrosis in GNMT-KO mice. Because GNMT expression is down-regulated in patients with cirrhosis, and because some subjects with GNMT mutations have spontaneous liver disease, the clinical implications of the present findings are obvious, at least with respect to these latter individuals. Because NAM has been used for many years to treat a broad spectrum of diseases (including pellagra and diabetes) without significant side effects, it should be considered in subjects with GNMT mutations.
CONCLUSION - The findings of this study indicate that the anomalous accumulation of SAM in GNMT-KO mice can be corrected by NAM treatment leading to the normalization of the expression of many genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as reversion of the appearance of the pathologic phenotype.
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10 MeSH Terms
HuR/methyl-HuR and AUF1 regulate the MAT expressed during liver proliferation, differentiation, and carcinogenesis.
Vázquez-Chantada M, Fernández-Ramos D, Embade N, Martínez-Lopez N, Varela-Rey M, Woodhoo A, Luka Z, Wagner C, Anglim PP, Finnell RH, Caballería J, Laird-Offringa IA, Gorospe M, Lu SC, Mato JM, Martínez-Chantar ML
(2010) Gastroenterology 138: 1943-53
MeSH Terms: 3' Untranslated Regions, Animals, Antigens, Surface, Binding Sites, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Cells, Cultured, ELAV Proteins, ELAV-Like Protein 1, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Gestational Age, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Half-Life, Hepatocytes, Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein D, Humans, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Methionine Adenosyltransferase, Methylation, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, RNA Interference, RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional, RNA Stability, RNA, Messenger, RNA-Binding Proteins, Rats, Rats, Wistar, S-Adenosylmethionine, Signal Transduction, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Hepatic de-differentiation, liver development, and malignant transformation are processes in which the levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine are tightly regulated by 2 genes: methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) and methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (MAT2A). MAT1A is expressed in the adult liver, whereas MAT2A expression primarily is extrahepatic and is associated strongly with liver proliferation. The mechanisms that regulate these expression patterns are not completely understood.
METHODS - In silico analysis of the 3' untranslated region of MAT1A and MAT2A revealed putative binding sites for the RNA-binding proteins AU-rich RNA binding factor 1 (AUF1) and HuR, respectively. We investigated the posttranscriptional regulation of MAT1A and MAT2A by AUF1, HuR, and methyl-HuR in the aforementioned biological processes.
RESULTS - During hepatic de-differentiation, the switch between MAT1A and MAT2A coincided with an increase in HuR and AUF1 expression. S-adenosylmethionine treatment altered this homeostasis by shifting the balance of AUF1 and methyl-HuR/HuR, which was identified as an inhibitor of MAT2A messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. We also observed a similar temporal distribution and a functional link between HuR, methyl-HuR, AUF1, and MAT1A and MAT2A during fetal liver development. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed increased levels of HuR and AUF1, and a decrease in methyl-HuR levels in human livers with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
CONCLUSIONS - Our data strongly support a role for AUF1 and HuR/methyl-HuR in liver de-differentiation, development, and human HCC progression through the posttranslational regulation of MAT1A and MAT2A mRNAs.
Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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34 MeSH Terms
Impaired liver regeneration in mice lacking glycine N-methyltransferase.
Varela-Rey M, Fernández-Ramos D, Martínez-López N, Embade N, Gómez-Santos L, Beraza N, Vázquez-Chantada M, Rodríguez J, Luka Z, Wagner C, Lu SC, Martínez-Chantar ML, Mato JM
(2009) Hepatology 50: 443-52
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Animals, Cell Cycle, Cells, Cultured, Glycine N-Methyltransferase, Hepatectomy, Hepatocytes, Liver Regeneration, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, NF-kappa B, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, S-Adenosylmethionine, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
UNLABELLED - Hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is maintained constant by the action of methionine adenosyltransferase I/III (MATI/III), which converts methionine into SAMe and glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), which eliminates excess SAMe to avoid aberrant methylation reactions. During liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) MATI/III activity is inhibited leading to a decrease in SAMe. This injury-related reduction in SAMe promotes hepatocyte proliferation because SAMe inhibits hepatocyte DNA synthesis. In MATI/III-deficient mice, hepatic SAMe is reduced, resulting in uncontrolled hepatocyte growth and impaired liver regeneration. These observations suggest that a reduction in SAMe is crucial for successful liver regeneration. In support of this hypothesis we report that liver regeneration is impaired in GNMT knockout (GNMT-KO) mice. Liver SAMe is 50-fold higher in GNMT-KO mice than in control animals and is maintained constant following PH. Mortality after PH was higher in GNMT-KO mice than in control animals. In GNMT-KO mice, nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclin D1, cyclin A, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase were activated at baseline. PH in GNMT-KO mice was followed by the inactivation of STAT3 phosphorylation and iNOS expression. NFkappaB, cyclin D1 and cyclin A were not further activated after PH. The LKB1/AMP-activated protein kinase/endothelial nitric oxide synthase cascade was inhibited, and cytoplasmic HuR translocation was blocked despite preserved induction of DNA synthesis in GNMT-KO after PH. Furthermore, a previously unexpected relationship between AMPK phosphorylation and NFkappaB activation was uncovered.
CONCLUSION - These results indicate that multiple signaling pathways are impaired during the liver regenerative response in GNMT-KO mice, suggesting that GNMT plays a critical role during liver regeneration, promoting hepatocyte viability and normal proliferation.
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18 MeSH Terms