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Results: 1 to 10 of 44

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Bile diversion, a bariatric surgery, and bile acid signaling reduce central cocaine reward.
Reddy IA, Smith NK, Erreger K, Ghose D, Saunders C, Foster DJ, Turner B, Poe A, Albaugh VL, McGuinness O, Hackett TA, Grueter BA, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR, Galli A
(2018) PLoS Biol 16: e2006682
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bariatric Surgery, Behavior, Animal, Bile, Choice Behavior, Cocaine, Dopamine, Gallbladder, Ileum, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Motor Activity, Nucleus Accumbens, Reward, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2019
The gut-to-brain axis exhibits significant control over motivated behavior. However, mechanisms supporting this communication are poorly understood. We reveal that a gut-based bariatric surgery chronically elevates systemic bile acids and attenuates cocaine-induced elevations in accumbal dopamine. Notably, this surgery reduces reward-related behavior and psychomotor sensitization to cocaine. Utilizing a knockout mouse model, we have determined that a main mediator of these post-operative effects is the Takeda G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5). Viral restoration of TGR5 in the nucleus accumbens of TGR5 knockout animals is sufficient to restore cocaine reward, centrally localizing this TGR5-mediated modulation. These findings define TGR5 and bile acid signaling as pharmacological targets for the treatment of cocaine abuse and reveal a novel mechanism of gut-to-brain communication.
0 Communities
2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Genetic loss of GluN2B in D1-expressing cell types enhances long-term cocaine reward and potentiation of thalamo-accumbens synapses.
Joffe ME, Turner BD, Delpire E, Grueter BA
(2018) Neuropsychopharmacology 43: 2383-2389
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cocaine, Gene Deletion, Locomotion, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Nucleus Accumbens, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Reward, Thalamus
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Transient upregulation of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (R) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is proposed as an intermediate to long-term AMPAR plasticity associated with persistent cocaine-related behaviors. However, cell type- and input-specific contributions of GluN2B underlying lasting actions of cocaine remain to be elucidated. We utilized GluN2B cell type-specific knockouts and optogenetics to deconstruct the role of GluN2B in cocaine-induced NAc synaptic and behavioral plasticity. While reward learning was unaffected, loss of GluN2B in D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1) led to prolonged retention of reward memory. In control mice, prefrontal cortex (PFC)-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function was unaffected by cocaine exposure, while midline thalamus (mThal)-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function was potentiated but diminished after withdrawal. In D1-GluN2B mice, the potentiation of mThal-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function persisted following withdrawal, corresponding with continued expression of cocaine reward behavior. These data suggest NAc GluN2B-containing NMDARs serve a feedback role and may weaken reward-related memories.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Individual differences in dopamine D receptor availability correlate with reward valuation.
Dang LC, Samanez-Larkin GR, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Cowan RL, Zald DH
(2018) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 18: 739-747
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anticipation, Psychological, Benzamides, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Female, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Individuality, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Oxygen, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Reward
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Reward valuation, which underlies all value-based decision-making, has been associated with dopamine function in many studies of nonhuman animals, but there is relatively less direct evidence for an association in humans. Here, we measured dopamine D receptor (DRD2) availability in vivo in humans to examine relations between individual differences in dopamine receptor availability and neural activity associated with a measure of reward valuation, expected value (i.e., the product of reward magnitude and the probability of obtaining the reward). Fourteen healthy adult subjects underwent PET with [F]fallypride, a radiotracer with strong affinity for DRD2, and fMRI (on a separate day) while performing a reward valuation task. [F]fallypride binding potential, reflecting DRD2 availability, in the midbrain correlated positively with neural activity associated with expected value, specifically in the left ventral striatum/caudate. The present results provide in vivo evidence from humans showing midbrain dopamine characteristics are associated with reward valuation.
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1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Subjective value representations during effort, probability and time discounting across adulthood.
Seaman KL, Brooks N, Karrer TM, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Dang LC, Hsu M, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2018) Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 13: 449-459
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Brain, Choice Behavior, Cognition, Decision Making, Delay Discounting, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Neuropsychological Tests, Physical Exertion, Probability, Psychomotor Performance, Reward, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Every day, humans make countless decisions that require the integration of information about potential benefits (i.e. rewards) with other decision features (i.e. effort required, probability of an outcome or time delays). Here, we examine the overlap and dissociation of behavioral preferences and neural representations of subjective value in the context of three different decision features (physical effort, probability and time delays) in a healthy adult life span sample. While undergoing functional neuroimaging, participants (N = 75) made incentive compatible choices between a smaller monetary reward with lower physical effort, higher probability, or a shorter time delay versus a larger monetary reward with higher physical effort, lower probability, or a longer time delay. Behavioral preferences were estimated from observed choices, and subjective values were computed using individual hyperbolic discount functions. We found that discount rates were uncorrelated across tasks. Despite this apparent behavioral dissociation between preferences, we found overlapping subjective value-related activity in the medial prefrontal cortex across all three tasks. We found no consistent evidence for age differences in either preferences or the neural representations of subjective value across adulthood. These results suggest that while the tolerance of decision features is behaviorally dissociable, subjective value signals share a common representation across adulthood.
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MeSH Terms
Ventral striatal network connectivity reflects reward learning and behavior in patients with Parkinson's disease.
Petersen K, Van Wouwe N, Stark A, Lin YC, Kang H, Trujillo-Diaz P, Kessler R, Zald D, Donahue MJ, Claassen DO
(2018) Hum Brain Mapp 39: 509-521
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Antiparkinson Agents, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Dopamine Agonists, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen, Parkinson Disease, Reward, Ventral Striatum
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
A subgroup of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with dopaminergic therapy develop compulsive reward-driven behaviors, which can result in life-altering morbidity. The mesocorticolimbic dopamine network guides reward-motivated behavior; however, its role in this treatment-related behavioral phenotype is incompletely understood. Here, mesocorticolimbic network function in PD patients who develop impulsive and compulsive behaviors (ICB) in response to dopamine agonists was assessed using BOLD fMRI. The tested hypothesis was that network connectivity between the ventral striatum and the limbic cortex is elevated in patients with ICB and that reward-learning proficiency reflects the extent of mesocorticolimbic network connectivity. To evaluate this hypothesis, 3.0T BOLD-fMRI was applied to measure baseline functional connectivity on and off dopamine agonist therapy in age and sex-matched PD patients with (n = 19) or without (n = 18) ICB. An incentive-based task was administered to a subset of patients (n = 20) to quantify positively or negatively reinforced learning. Whole-brain voxelwise analyses and region-of-interest-based mixed linear effects modeling were performed. Elevated ventral striatal connectivity to the anterior cingulate gyrus (P = 0.013), orbitofrontal cortex (P = 0.034), insula (P = 0.044), putamen (P = 0.014), globus pallidus (P < 0.01), and thalamus (P < 0.01) was observed in patients with ICB. A strong trend for elevated amygdala-to-midbrain connectivity was found in ICB patients on dopamine agonist. Ventral striatum-to-subgenual cingulate connectivity correlated with reward learning (P < 0.01), but not with punishment-avoidance learning. These data indicate that PD-ICB patients have elevated network connectivity in the mesocorticolimbic network. Behaviorally, proficient reward-based learning is related to this enhanced limbic and ventral striatal connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 39:509-521, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Personality correlates of individual differences in the recruitment of cognitive mechanisms when rewards are at stake.
Heritage AJ, Long LJ, Woodman GF, Zald DH
(2018) Psychophysiology 55:
MeSH Terms: Attention, Brain, Cognition, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Female, Humans, Individuality, Inhibition (Psychology), Male, Memory, Long-Term, Memory, Short-Term, Neuropsychological Tests, Personality, Reward
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Individuals differ greatly in their sensitivity to rewards and punishments. In the extreme, these differences are implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders from addiction to depression. However, it is unclear how these differences influence the recruitment of attention, working memory, and long-term memory when responding to potential rewards. Here, we used a rewarded memory-guided visual search task and ERPs to examine the influence of individual differences in self-reported reward/punishment sensitivity, as measured by the Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS)/Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scales, on the recruitment of cognitive mechanisms in conditions of potential reward. Select subscales of the BAS, including the fun seeking and reward responsiveness scales, showed unique relationships with context updating to reward cues and working memory maintenance of potentially rewarded stimuli. In contrast, BIS scores showed unique relationships with deployment of attention at different points in the task. These results suggest that sensitivity to rewards (i.e., BAS) and to punishment (i.e., BIS) may play an important role in the recruitment of specific and distinct cognitive mechanisms in conditions of potential rewards.
© 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.
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1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Reward Processing, Neuroeconomics, and Psychopathology.
Zald DH, Treadway MT
(2017) Annu Rev Clin Psychol 13: 471-495
MeSH Terms: Economics, Behavioral, Humans, Mental Disorders, Reward
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Abnormal reward processing is a prominent transdiagnostic feature of psychopathology. The present review provides a framework for considering the different aspects of reward processing and their assessment, and highlights recent insights from the field of neuroeconomics that may aid in understanding these processes. Although altered reward processing in psychopathology has often been treated as a general hypo- or hyperresponsivity to reward, increasing data indicate that a comprehensive understanding of reward dysfunction requires characterization within more specific reward-processing domains, including subjective valuation, discounting, hedonics, reward anticipation and facilitation, and reinforcement learning. As such, more nuanced models of the nature of these abnormalities are needed. We describe several processing abnormalities capable of producing the types of selective alterations in reward-related behavior observed in different forms of psychopathology, including (mal)adaptive scaling and anchoring, dysfunctional weighting of reward and cost variables, competition between valuation systems, and reward prediction error signaling.
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4 MeSH Terms
Oleoylethanolamide: A fat ally in the fight against obesity.
Brown JD, Karimian Azari E, Ayala JE
(2017) Physiol Behav 176: 50-58
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Obesity Agents, Eating, Endocannabinoids, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Obesity, Oleic Acids, Reward
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2017
Obesity is a pandemic, gateway disease that has thrived in modern, sedentary, high calorie-eating societies. Left unchecked, obesity and obesity-related diseases will continue to plague future generations with heavy burdens on economies, healthcare systems, and the quality of life of billions. There is a significant need to elucidate basic physiological mechanisms and therapies that address this global health care crisis. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endocannabinoid-like lipid that induces hypophagia and reduces fat mass in rodents. For over a decade, PPAR-α has been the most widely accepted mediator of the hypophagic action of OEA via signaling to homeostatic brain centers. Recent evidence suggests that OEA may also reduce food intake via effects on dopamine and endocannabinoid signaling within hedonic brain centers. Limited study of OEA supplementation in humans has provided some encouraging insight into OEA-based weight loss therapy, but more thorough, controlled investigations are needed. As a potential link between homeostatic and hedonic regulation of food intake, OEA is a prime starting point for the development of more effective obesity therapies.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Adult age differences in decision making across domains: Increased discounting of social and health-related rewards.
Seaman KL, Gorlick MA, Vekaria KM, Hsu M, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2016) Psychol Aging 31: 737-746
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Decision Making, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Reward, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Although research on aging and decision making continues to grow, the majority of studies examine decisions made to maximize monetary earnings or points. It is not clear whether these results generalize to other types of rewards. To investigate this, we examined adult age differences in 92 healthy participants aged 22 to 83. Participants completed 9 hypothetical discounting tasks, which included 3 types of discounting factors (time, probability, effort) across 3 reward domains (monetary, social, health). Participants made choices between a smaller magnitude reward with a shorter time delay/higher probability/lower level of physical effort required and a larger magnitude reward with a longer time delay/lower probability/higher level of physical effort required. Older compared with younger individuals were more likely to choose options that involved shorter time delays or higher probabilities of experiencing an interaction with a close social partner or receiving health benefits from a hypothetical drug. These findings suggest that older adults may be more motivated than young adults to obtain social and health rewards immediately and with certainty. (PsycINFO Database Record
(c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).
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12 MeSH Terms
Modulation of impulsivity and reward sensitivity in intertemporal choice by striatal and midbrain dopamine synthesis in healthy adults.
Smith CT, Wallace DL, Dang LC, Aarts E, Jagust WJ, D'Esposito M, Boettiger CA
(2016) J Neurophysiol 115: 1146-56
MeSH Terms: Adult, Choice Behavior, Dopamine, Female, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Male, Mesencephalon, Positron-Emission Tomography, Putamen, Radiopharmaceuticals, Reaction Time, Reward, Tyrosine
Show Abstract · Added February 9, 2017
Converging evidence links individual differences in mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine (DA) to variation in the tendency to choose immediate rewards ("Now") over larger, delayed rewards ("Later"), or "Now bias." However, to date, no study of healthy young adults has evaluated the relationship between Now bias and DA with positron emission tomography (PET). Sixteen healthy adults (ages 24-34 yr; 50% women) completed a delay-discounting task that quantified aspects of intertemporal reward choice, including Now bias and reward magnitude sensitivity. Participants also underwent PET scanning with 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT), a radiotracer that measures DA synthesis capacity. Lower putamen FMT signal predicted elevated Now bias, a more rapidly declining discount rate with increasing delay time, and reduced willingness to accept low-interest-rate delayed rewards. In contrast, lower FMT signal in the midbrain predicted greater sensitivity to increasing magnitude of the Later reward. These data demonstrate that intertemporal reward choice in healthy humans varies with region-specific measures of DA processing, with regionally distinct associations with sensitivity to delay and to reward magnitude.
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14 MeSH Terms