Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 533

Publication Record

Connections

A Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology Can Transform Mental Health Research.
Conway CC, Forbes MK, Forbush KT, Fried EI, Hallquist MN, Kotov R, Mullins-Sweatt SN, Shackman AJ, Skodol AE, South SC, Sunderland M, Waszczuk MA, Zald DH, Afzali MH, Bornovalova MA, Carragher N, Docherty AR, Jonas KG, Krueger RF, Patalay P, Pincus AL, Tackett JL, Reininghaus U, Waldman ID, Wright AGC, Zimmermann J, Bach B, Bagby RM, Chmielewski M, Cicero DC, Clark LA, Dalgleish T, DeYoung CG, Hopwood CJ, Ivanova MY, Latzman RD, Patrick CJ, Ruggero CJ, Samuel DB, Watson D, Eaton NR
(2019) Perspect Psychol Sci 14: 419-436
MeSH Terms: Heuristics, Humans, Mental Disorders, Models, Theoretical, Research Design, Terminology as Topic
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
For more than a century, research on psychopathology has focused on categorical diagnoses. Although this work has produced major discoveries, growing evidence points to the superiority of a dimensional approach to the science of mental illness. Here we outline one such dimensional system-the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP)-that is based on empirical patterns of co-occurrence among psychological symptoms. We highlight key ways in which this framework can advance mental-health research, and we provide some heuristics for using HiTOP to test theories of psychopathology. We then review emerging evidence that supports the value of a hierarchical, dimensional model of mental illness across diverse research areas in psychological science. These new data suggest that the HiTOP system has the potential to accelerate and improve research on mental-health problems as well as efforts to more effectively assess, prevent, and treat mental illness.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
6 MeSH Terms
Sleep in Teens With Type 1 Diabetes: Perspectives From Adolescents and Their Caregivers.
Bergner EM, Williams R, Hamburger ER, Lyttle M, Davis AC, Malow B, Simmons JH, Lybarger C, Capin R, Jaser SS
(2018) Diabetes Educ 44: 541-548
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Caregivers, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Humans, Male, Perception, Qualitative Research, Sleep, Sleep Wake Disorders
Show Abstract · Added January 30, 2019
PURPOSE - The purpose of this study is to identify barriers, facilitators, and consequences of obtaining sufficient sleep in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
METHODS - Semistructured interviews were conducted with 25 adolescents (52% female, mean age = 15.6 years) and 25 caregivers. Interviews were transcribed and coded using Atlas.ti. A thematic analytic approach was used to identify and organize significant patterns of meaning (themes) and interpret themes across the data.
RESULTS - Several barriers were identified, with the most common being the use of electronics before bed and sleep disturbances related to diabetes management. Caregivers described strategies for helping adolescents achieve sufficient sleep, such as enforcing bedtimes and limiting distractions, but many adolescents could not identify facilitators of sleep. Weekday/weekend discrepancies in sleep timing were commonly disclosed.
CONCLUSIONS - This study is the first to examine the perceptions of barriers and facilitators to obtaining sufficient sleep in adolescents with T1D and their caregivers. Results have the potential to inform providers' recommendations regarding sleep, including possible interventions to promote sleep in this high-risk population.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Interdisciplinary Models for Research and Clinical Endeavors in Genomic Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Musunuru K, Arora P, Cooke JP, Ferguson JF, Hershberger RE, Hickey KT, Lee JM, Lima JAC, Loscalzo J, Pereira NL, Russell MW, Shah SH, Sheikh F, Wang TJ, MacRae CA, American Heart Association Council on Genomic and Precision Medicine; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research; and Stroke Council
(2018) Circ Genom Precis Med 11: e000046
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Biomedical Research, Cardiovascular Diseases, Electronic Health Records, Genomics, Humans, Interdisciplinary Studies, Precision Medicine, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
The completion of the Human Genome Project has unleashed a wealth of human genomics information, but it remains unclear how best to implement this information for the benefit of patients. The standard approach of biomedical research, with researchers pursuing advances in knowledge in the laboratory and, separately, clinicians translating research findings into the clinic as much as decades later, will need to give way to new interdisciplinary models for research in genomic medicine. These models should include scientists and clinicians actively working as teams to study patients and populations recruited in clinical settings and communities to make genomics discoveries-through the combined efforts of data scientists, clinical researchers, epidemiologists, and basic scientists-and to rapidly apply these discoveries in the clinic for the prediction, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The highly publicized US Precision Medicine Initiative, also known as All of Us, is a large-scale program funded by the US National Institutes of Health that will energize these efforts, but several ongoing studies such as the UK Biobank Initiative; the Million Veteran Program; the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network; the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health; and the DiscovEHR collaboration are already providing exemplary models of this kind of interdisciplinary work. In this statement, we outline the opportunities and challenges in broadly implementing new interdisciplinary models in academic medical centers and community settings and bringing the promise of genomics to fruition.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Attitudes of Radiology Program Directors Toward MD-PhD Trainees, Resident Research Productivity, and Dedicated Research Time.
Cogswell PM, Deitte LA, Donnelly EF, Morgan VL, Omary RA
(2018) Acad Radiol 25: 733-738
MeSH Terms: Attitude of Health Personnel, Biomedical Research, Clinical Competence, Efficiency, Humans, Internship and Residency, Physician Executives, Radiology, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 16, 2018
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES - The percentage of clinical scientists in radiology has historically been low. Increasing the pipeline of trainees interested in research could occur by recruiting MD-PhD trainees and providing protected research time during residency. The purpose of this work is to assess the attitudes of radiology program directors toward MD-PhD trainees, resident research productivity, and dedicated research time.
METHODS - An online survey was sent to residency program directors of all diagnostic radiology departments that received National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards in 2014 (n = 63). Survey questions included program size; perception of overall performance, clinical performance, and research productivity of MD-PhD residents compared to non-PhD residents; and presence of dedicated research time. Responses comparing MD-PhD residents to non-PhD residents were reported as a five-point Likert scale. Student t test was used to assess for significance (alpha = 0.05).
RESULTS - Response rate was 37%. Clinical performance of MD-PhD residents was judged inferior (P < .05) to non-PhD residents, although that of all residents engaged in research trended toward superiority compared to those not involved in research. Dedicated research time is offered by 61% of programs in years R1-R3 and all programs in year R4. Research productivity during residency was judged to be similar (P = .5) between MD-PhD and non-PhD residents.
CONCLUSIONS - Survey results suggest that clinical performance during residency and research involvement is often individually based and difficult to generalize based on prior PhD training. All programs offered dedicated research time, and the vast majority of residents were reported to engage in research during residency, which may increase the pipeline of trainees interested in an academic career.
Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Perspective on the interpretation of research and translation to clinical care with therapy-associated metastatic breast cancer progression as an example.
Fingleton B, Lange K, Caldwell B, Bankaitis KV, Board of the Metastasis Research Society
(2017) Clin Exp Metastasis 34: 443-447
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Breast Neoplasms, Decision Making, Disease Progression, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Humans, Translational Medical Research
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
This commentary was written as a collaboration between the Board of the Metastasis Research Society and two patients with metastatic breast cancer. It was conceived in response to how preclinical scientific research is sometimes presented to non-scientists in a way that can cause stress and confusion. Translation of preclinical findings to the clinic requires overcoming multiple barriers. This is irrespective of whether the findings relate to exciting responses to new therapies or problematic effects of currently used therapies. It is important that these barriers are understood and acknowledged when research findings are summarized for mainstream reporting. To minimize confusion, patients should continue to rely on their oncology care team to help them interpret whether research findings presented in mainstream media have relevance for their individual care. Researchers, both bench and clinical, should work together where possible to increase options for patients with metastatic disease, which is still in desperate need of effective therapeutic approaches.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Research Directions in the Clinical Implementation of Pharmacogenomics: An Overview of US Programs and Projects.
Volpi S, Bult CJ, Chisholm RL, Deverka PA, Ginsburg GS, Jacob HJ, Kasapi M, McLeod HL, Roden DM, Williams MS, Green ED, Rodriguez LL, Aronson S, Cavallari LH, Denny JC, Dressler LG, Johnson JA, Klein TE, Leeder JS, Piquette-Miller M, Perera M, Rasmussen-Torvik LJ, Rehm HL, Ritchie MD, Skaar TC, Wagle N, Weinshilboum R, Weitzel KW, Wildin R, Wilson J, Manolio TA, Relling MV
(2018) Clin Pharmacol Ther 103: 778-786
MeSH Terms: Humans, Pharmacogenetics, Precision Medicine, Research, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Response to a drug often differs widely among individual patients. This variability is frequently observed not only with respect to effective responses but also with adverse drug reactions. Matching patients to the drugs that are most likely to be effective and least likely to cause harm is the goal of effective therapeutics. Pharmacogenomics (PGx) holds the promise of precision medicine through elucidating the genetic determinants responsible for pharmacological outcomes and using them to guide drug selection and dosing. Here we survey the US landscape of research programs in PGx implementation, review current advances and clinical applications of PGx, summarize the obstacles that have hindered PGx implementation, and identify the critical knowledge gaps and possible studies needed to help to address them.
© 2018 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
Randomised controlled pragmatic clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call on 30-day hospital readmissions: balancing pragmatic and explanatory design considerations.
Yiadom MYAB, Domenico H, Byrne D, Hasselblad MM, Gatto CL, Kripalani S, Choma N, Tucker S, Wang L, Bhatia MC, Morrison J, Harrell FE, Hartert T, Bernard G
(2018) BMJ Open 8: e019600
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aftercare, Communication, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Mortality, Patient Discharge, Patient Readmission, Patient Satisfaction, Research Design, Telemedicine, Telephone, Transitional Care
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Hospital readmissions within 30 days are a healthcare quality problem associated with increased costs and poor health outcomes. Identifying interventions to improve patients' successful transition from inpatient to outpatient care is a continued challenge.
METHODS AND ANALYSIS - This is a single-centre pragmatic randomised and controlled clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call to reduce 30-day inpatient readmissions. Our primary endpoint is inpatient readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge censored for death analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. Secondary endpoints included observation status readmission within 30 days, time to readmission, all-cause emergency department revisits within 30 days, patient satisfaction (measured as mean Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores) and 30-day mortality. Exploratory endpoints include the need for assistance with discharge plan implementation among those randomised to the intervention arm and reached by the study nurse, and the number of call attempts to achieve successful intervention delivery. Consistent with the Learning Healthcare System model for clinical research, timeliness is a critical quality for studies to most effectively inform hospital clinical practice. We are challenged to apply pragmatic design elements in order to maintain a high-quality practicable study providing timely results. This type of prospective pragmatic trial empowers the advancement of hospital-wide evidence-based practice directly affecting patients.
ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION - Study results will inform the structure, objective and function of future iterations of the hospital's discharge follow-up phone call programme and be submitted for publication in the literature.
TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER - NCT03050918; Pre-results.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Memory decline from hippocampal electrodes? Let's not forget statistics and study design.
Englot DJ, Rolston JD
(2018) Epilepsia 59: 502-503
MeSH Terms: Electrodes, Hippocampus, Memory, Research Design, Temporal Lobe
Added September 25, 2018
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
Survey of checkpoints along the pathway to diverse biomedical research faculty.
Meyers LC, Brown AM, Moneta-Koehler L, Chalkley R
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0190606
MeSH Terms: Academies and Institutes, Biology, Biomedical Research, Cultural Diversity, Faculty, Humans, Minority Groups
Show Abstract · Added March 9, 2018
There is a persistent shortage of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. We examined the entire training pathway of potential candidates to identify the points of greatest loss. Using a range of recent national data sources, including the National Science Foundation's Survey of Earned Doctorates and Survey of Doctoral Recipients, we analyzed the demographics of the population of interest, specifically those from URM backgrounds with an interest in biomedical sciences. We examined the URM population from high school graduates through undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral training as well as the URM population in basic science tenure track faculty positions at medical schools. We find that URM and non-URM trainees are equally likely to transition into doctoral programs, to receive their doctoral degree, and to secure a postdoctoral position. However, the analysis reveals that the diversions from developing a faculty career are found primarily at two clearly identifiable places, specifically during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure track faculty in the basic sciences at medical schools. We suggest focusing additional interventions on these two stages along the educational pathway.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Translating Knowledge Into Therapy for Acute Kidney Injury.
de Caestecker M, Harris R
(2018) Semin Nephrol 38: 88-97
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Biopsy, Clinical Trials as Topic, Humans, Kidney, Patient Selection, Phenotype, Precision Medicine, Translational Medical Research
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2018
No therapies have been shown to improve outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI this represents an important unmet medical need. A common feature of all of the therapeutic development efforts for AKI is that none were driven by target selection or preclinical modeling that was based primarily on human data. This is important when considering a heterogeneous and dynamic condition such as AKI, in which in the absence of more accurate molecular classifications, clinical cohorts are likely to include patients with different types of injury at different stages in the injury and repair continuum. The National Institutes of Health precision medicine initiative offers an opportunity to address this. By creating a molecular tissue atlas of AKI, defining patient subgroups, and identifying critical cells and pathways involved in human AKI, this initiative has the potential to transform our current approach to therapeutic discovery. In this review, we discuss the opportunities and challenges that this initiative presents, with a specific focus on AKI, what additional efforts will be needed to apply these discoveries to therapeutic development, and how we believe this effort might lead to the development of new therapeutics for subsets of patients with AKI.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms