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CADASIL as a Useful Medical Model and Genetic Form of Vascular Depression.
Park JH, Jeon BH, Lee JS, Newhouse PA, Taylor WD, Boyd BD, Kim KW, Kim MD
(2017) Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 25: 719-727
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, CADASIL, Depression, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Genotype, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Republic of Korea, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
OBJECTIVE - The main magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarctions, and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of these three neuroimaging markers of CADASIL on depression to determine whether CADASIL is a useful medical model supporting the vascular depression hypothesis.
METHODS - Eighty-four subjects with CADASIL, aged 34-86 years, participated in this study. They underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, including 3T MRI and genotyping of NOTCH3. The effects of WMH, lacunar infarctions, and CMBs were analyzed by path analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses.
RESULTS - Patients with CADASIL exhibited frequencies of 17.9% for major depressive disorder (MDD) and 10.7% for minor depressive disorder. The frequency of MDD increased from 5.0% to 46.2% as WMH volume increased from first quartile to fourth quartile. WMH volume (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.003-1.06) in patients with CADASIL was associated with the current depressive disorder. Path analyses demonstrated that only WMH volume was associated with the Korean version of the short form Geriatric Depression Scale score, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score, and 17-item Hamilton depression scale score. The effects of lacunar infarctions and CMBs on depression were not significant in path analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - This study demonstrates that WMHs are closely associated with depression in patients with CADASIL. This supports that CADASIL might be a useful medical model and genetic form of vascular depression.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori bab Paralog Distribution and Association with cagA, vacA, and homA/B Genotypes in American and South Korean Clinical Isolates.
Kim A, Servetas SL, Kang J, Kim J, Jang S, Cha HJ, Lee WJ, Kim J, Romero-Gallo J, Peek RM, Merrell DS, Cha JH
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0137078
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins, Bacterial Proteins, Female, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Genotyping Techniques, Helicobacter pylori, Hospitals, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Phylogeny, Republic of Korea, Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
Helicobacter pylori genetic variation is a crucial component of colonization and persistence within the inhospitable niche of the gastric mucosa. As such, numerous H. pylori genes have been shown to vary in terms of presence and genomic location within this pathogen. Among the variable factors, the Bab family of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been shown to differ within subsets of strains. To better understand genetic variation among the bab genes and to determine whether this variation differed among isolates obtained from different geographic locations, we characterized the distribution of the Bab family members in 80 American H. pylori clinical isolates (AH) and 80 South Korean H. pylori clinical isolates (KH). Overall, we identified 23 different bab genotypes (19 in AH and 11 in KH), but only 5 occurred in greater than 5 isolates. Regardless of strain origin, a strain in which locus A and locus B were both occupied by a bab gene was the most common (85%); locus C was only occupied in those isolates that carried bab paralog at locus A and B. While the babA/babB/- genotype predominated in the KH (78.8%), no single genotype could account for greater than 40% in the AH collection. In addition to basic genotyping, we also identified associations between bab genotype and well known virulence factors cagA and vacA. Specifically, significant associations between babA at locus A and the cagA EPIYA-ABD motif (P<0.0001) and the vacA s1/i1/m1 allele (P<0.0001) were identified. Log-linear modeling further revealed a three-way association between bab carried at locus A, vacA, and number of OMPs from the HOM family (P<0.002). En masse this study provides a detailed characterization of the bab genotypes from two distinct populations. Our analysis suggests greater variability in the AH, perhaps due to adaptation to a more diverse host population. Furthermore, when considering the presence or absence of both the bab and homA/B paralogs at their given loci and the vacA genotype, an association was observed. Our results highlight the multifactorial nature of H. pylori mediated disease and the importance of considering how the specific combinations of H. pylori virulence genes and their multiple interactions with the host will collectively impact disease progression.
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19 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study of gastric adenocarcinoma in Asia: a comparison of associations between cardia and non-cardia tumours.
Hu N, Wang Z, Song X, Wei L, Kim BS, Freedman ND, Baek J, Burdette L, Chang J, Chung C, Dawsey SM, Ding T, Gao YT, Giffen C, Han Y, Hong M, Huang J, Kim HS, Koh WP, Liao LM, Mao YM, Qiao YL, Shu XO, Tan W, Wang C, Wu C, Wu MJ, Xiang YB, Yeager M, Yook JH, Yuan JM, Zhang P, Zhao XK, Zheng W, Song K, Wang LD, Lin D, Chanock SJ, Goldstein AM, Taylor PR, Abnet CC
(2016) Gut 65: 1611-8
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Adenocarcinoma, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Cardia, Case-Control Studies, China, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Mucin-1, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Republic of Korea, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added October 8, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of gastric cancer have reported differences in single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations for tumour subtypes, particularly when divided by location into the gastric cardia versus the non-cardia.
DESIGN - Here we present results for a GWAS using 2350 East Asian gastric cancer cases divided as 1189 gastric cardia and 1027 gastric non-cardia cases and 2708 controls. We also included up to 3042 cardia cases, 4359 non-cardia cases and 7548 controls for replication from two Chinese studies and one Korean study. From the GWAS, we selected 12 top SNPs for each gastric cancer subtype, 4 top SNPs for total gastric cancer and 1 SNP in MUC1 for replication testing.
RESULTS - We observed genome-wide significant associations for rs10074991 in PRKAA1 at 5p13.1 for cardia (p=7.36×10(-12)) and non-cardia cancers (p=2.42×10(-23)) with per allele OR (95% CI) for the combined endpoint of 0.80 (0.77 to 0.83). At 6p21.1, rs2294693 near UNC5CL was significantly associated with gastric non-cardia cancer risk (p=2.50×10(-8)), with OR (95% CI) of 1.18 (1.12 to 1.26), but there was only a nominal association for cardia cancer (p=1.47×10(-2)). We also confirmed a previously reported association for rs4072037 in MUC1 with p=6.59×10(-8) for total gastric cancer and similar estimates for cardia and non-cardia cancers. Three SNPs in PSCA previously reported to be associated with gastric non-cardia cancer showed no apparent association for cardia cancer.
CONCLUSIONS - Our results suggest that associations for SNPs with gastric cancer show some different results by tumour location in the stomach.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/
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16 MeSH Terms
Epidemiology of MRI-defined vascular depression: A longitudinal, community-based study in Korean elders.
Park JH, Lee SB, Lee JJ, Yoon JC, Han JW, Kim TH, Jeong HG, Newhouse PA, Taylor WD, Kim JH, Woo JI, Kim KW
(2015) J Affect Disord 180: 200-6
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Basal Ganglia, Brain, Cerebral Ventricles, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Comorbidity, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Depressive Disorder, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Geriatric Assessment, Health Status, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Republic of Korea
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
BACKGROUND - There are no cross-sectional or longitudinal epidemiological studies present on MRI-defined vascular depression in community populations. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence rates of both vascular and non-vascular late life depression (LLD) at baseline, to examine the natural course of LLD, and to investigate the influence of White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on depression after three years.
METHOD - The baseline study employed a two-stage design, Phase I population survey (n=783) and Phase II diagnostic evaluation (n=122). In the 3-year follow-up study, baseline participants completing the second phase were reassessed with the same methodology. WMHs severity was rated visually by the modified Fazekas scale and WMHs volume was calculated using an automated method.
RESULTS - The prevalence rates of vascular major depressive disorder (MDD) and vascular non-major depressive disorder (nMDD) were 2.39% (56.2% of MDD) and 4.24% (34.0% of nMDD). Subjects with a score of 2 or more on the modified Fazekas scale in either deep white matter hyperintensities or subcortical gray matter ratings had an 8.1 times greater risk of developing a depressive disorder in the 3-year follow-up study. Greater Log WMHs volume (odds ratio=5.78, 95% CI, 1.04-31.72) at baseline was an independent predictor for depressive disorder in the 3-year assessment.
LIMITATIONS - Response rate and follow-up rate were relatively low.
CONCLUSIONS - Vascular depression is common and makes up about a half of MDD in elders. Greater WMHs severity is a crucial factor predicting future depression risk, which supports the previous vascular depression hypothesis.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia.
Machiela MJ, Hsiung CA, Shu XO, Seow WJ, Wang Z, Matsuo K, Hong YC, Seow A, Wu C, Hosgood HD, Chen K, Wang JC, Wen W, Cawthon R, Chatterjee N, Hu W, Caporaso NE, Park JY, Chen CJ, Kim YH, Kim YT, Landi MT, Shen H, Lawrence C, Burdett L, Yeager M, Chang IS, Mitsudomi T, Kim HN, Chang GC, Bassig BA, Tucker M, Wei F, Yin Z, An SJ, Qian B, Lee VH, Lu D, Liu J, Jeon HS, Hsiao CF, Sung JS, Kim JH, Gao YT, Tsai YH, Jung YJ, Guo H, Hu Z, Hutchinson A, Wang WC, Klein RJ, Chung CC, Oh IJ, Chen KY, Berndt SI, Wu W, Chang J, Zhang XC, Huang MS, Zheng H, Wang J, Zhao X, Li Y, Choi JE, Su WC, Park KH, Sung SW, Chen YM, Liu L, Kang CH, Hu L, Chen CH, Pao W, Kim YC, Yang TY, Xu J, Guan P, Tan W, Su J, Wang CL, Li H, Sihoe AD, Zhao Z, Chen Y, Choi YY, Hung JY, Kim JS, Yoon HI, Cai Q, Lin CC, Park IK, Xu P, Dong J, Kim C, He Q, Perng RP, Kohno T, Kweon SS, Chen CY, Vermeulen RC, Wu J, Lim WY, Chen KC, Chow WH, Ji BT, Chan JK, Chu M, Li YJ, Yokota J, Li J, Chen H, Xiang YB, Yu CJ, Kunitoh H, Wu G, Jin L, Lo YL, Shiraishi K, Chen YH, Lin HC, Wu T, Wong MP, Wu YL, Yang PC, Zhou B, Shin MH, Fraumeni JF, Zheng W, Lin D, Chanock SJ, Rothman N, Lan Q
(2015) Int J Cancer 137: 311-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, China, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hong Kong, Humans, Japan, Lung Neoplasms, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors, Singapore, Smoking, Taiwan, Telomere, Telomere Homeostasis
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of seven telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women's Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of seven telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.34-1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, p value = 4.54 × 10(-14) ) even after removing rs2736100 (p value = 4.81 × 10(-3) ), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk.
Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.
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MeSH Terms
Large-scale genetic study in East Asians identifies six new loci associated with colorectal cancer risk.
Zhang B, Jia WH, Matsuda K, Kweon SS, Matsuo K, Xiang YB, Shin A, Jee SH, Kim DH, Cai Q, Long J, Shi J, Wen W, Yang G, Zhang Y, Li C, Li B, Guo Y, Ren Z, Ji BT, Pan ZZ, Takahashi A, Shin MH, Matsuda F, Gao YT, Oh JH, Kim S, Ahn YO, Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), Chan AT, Chang-Claude J, Slattery ML, Colorectal Transdisciplinary (CORECT) Study, Gruber SB, Schumacher FR, Stenzel SL, Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR), Casey G, Kim HR, Jeong JY, Park JW, Li HL, Hosono S, Cho SH, Kubo M, Shu XO, Zeng YX, Zheng W
(2014) Nat Genet 46: 533-42
MeSH Terms: Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, China, Chromosome Mapping, Colorectal Neoplasms, Computational Biology, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Japan, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Republic of Korea, Risk
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2014
Known genetic loci explain only a small proportion of the familial relative risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study of CRC in East Asians with 14,963 cases and 31,945 controls and identified 6 new loci associated with CRC risk (P = 3.42 × 10(-8) to 9.22 × 10(-21)) at 10q22.3, 10q25.2, 11q12.2, 12p13.31, 17p13.3 and 19q13.2. Two of these loci map to genes (TCF7L2 and TGFB1) with established roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Four other loci are located in or near genes involved in transcriptional regulation (ZMIZ1), genome maintenance (FEN1), fatty acid metabolism (FADS1 and FADS2), cancer cell motility and metastasis (CD9), and cell growth and differentiation (NXN). We also found suggestive evidence for three additional loci associated with CRC risk near genome-wide significance at 8q24.11, 10q21.1 and 10q24.2. Furthermore, we replicated 22 previously reported CRC-associated loci. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CRC and suggests the involvement of new biological pathways.
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20 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study identifies a new SMAD7 risk variant associated with colorectal cancer risk in East Asians.
Zhang B, Jia WH, Matsuo K, Shin A, Xiang YB, Matsuda K, Jee SH, Kim DH, Cheah PY, Ren Z, Cai Q, Long J, Shi J, Wen W, Yang G, Ji BT, Pan ZZ, Matsuda F, Gao YT, Oh JH, Ahn YO, Kubo M, Thean LF, Park EJ, Li HL, Park JW, Jo J, Jeong JY, Hosono S, Nakamura Y, Shu XO, Zeng YX, Zheng W
(2014) Int J Cancer 135: 948-55
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Alleles, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, China, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Japan, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Principal Component Analysis, Republic of Korea, Risk, Singapore, Smad7 Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been conducted primarily in European descendants. In a GWAS conducted in East Asians, we first analyzed approximately 1.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four studies with 1,773 CRC cases and 2,642 controls. We then selected 66 promising SNPs for replication and genotyped them in three independent studies with 3,612 cases and 3,523 controls. Five SNPs were further evaluated using data from four additional studies including up to 3,290 cases and 4,339 controls. SNP rs7229639 in the SMAD7 gene was found to be associated with CRC risk with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) associated with the minor allele (A) of 1.22 (1.15-1.29) in the combined analysis of all 11 studies (p = 2.93 × 10(-11) ). SNP rs7229639 is 2,487 bp upstream from rs4939827, a risk variant identified previously in a European-ancestry GWAS in relation to CRC risk. However, these two SNPs are not correlated in East Asians (r(2)  = 0.008) nor in Europeans (r(2)  = 0.146). The CRC association with rs7229639 remained statistically significant after adjusting for rs4939827 as well as three additional CRC risk variants (rs58920878, rs12953717 and rs4464148) reported previously in this region. SNPs rs7229639 and rs4939827 explained approximately 1% of the familial relative risk of CRC in East Asians. This study identifies a new CRC risk variant in the SMAD7 gene, further highlighting the significant role of this gene in the etiology of CRC.
© 2014 UICC.
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22 MeSH Terms
Meat intake and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of Asian prospective cohort studies.
Lee JE, McLerran DF, Rolland B, Chen Y, Grant EJ, Vedanthan R, Inoue M, Tsugane S, Gao YT, Tsuji I, Kakizaki M, Ahsan H, Ahn YO, Pan WH, Ozasa K, Yoo KY, Sasazuki S, Yang G, Watanabe T, Sugawara Y, Parvez F, Kim DH, Chuang SY, Ohishi W, Park SK, Feng Z, Thornquist M, Boffetta P, Zheng W, Kang D, Potter J, Sinha R
(2013) Am J Clin Nutr 98: 1032-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bangladesh, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cattle, Cause of Death, China, Cohort Studies, Diet, Female, Fishes, Humans, Japan, Male, Meat, Neoplasms, Poultry, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors, Seafood, Sex Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Taiwan, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
BACKGROUND - Total or red meat intake has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality in Western populations, but little is known of the risks in Asian populations.
OBJECTIVE - We examined temporal trends in meat consumption and associations between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Asia.
DESIGN - We used ecological data from the United Nations to compare country-specific meat consumption. Separately, 8 Asian prospective cohort studies in Bangladesh, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan consisting of 112,310 men and 184,411 women were followed for 6.6 to 15.6 y with 24,283 all-cause, 9558 cancer, and 6373 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. We estimated the study-specific HRs and 95% CIs by using a Cox regression model and pooled them by using a random-effects model.
RESULTS - Red meat consumption was substantially lower in the Asian countries than in the United States. Fish and seafood consumption was higher in Japan and Korea than in the United States. Our pooled analysis found no association between intake of total meat (red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood) and risks of all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality among men and women; HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality from a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 1.02 (0.91, 1.15) in men and 0.93 (0.86, 1.01) in women.
CONCLUSIONS - Ecological data indicate an increase in meat intake in Asian countries; however, our pooled analysis did not provide evidence of a higher risk of mortality for total meat intake and provided evidence of an inverse association with red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood. Red meat intake was inversely associated with CVD mortality in men and with cancer mortality in women in Asian countries.
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25 MeSH Terms
New breast cancer risk variant discovered at 10q25 in East Asian women.
Shi J, Sung H, Zhang B, Lu W, Choi JY, Xiang YB, Kim MK, Iwasaki M, Long J, Ji BT, Park SK, Zheng Y, Tsugane S, Yoo KY, Wang W, Noh DY, Han W, Kim SW, Lee MH, Lee JW, Lee JY, Shen CY, Matsuo K, Ahn SH, Gao YT, Shu XO, Cai Q, Kang D, Zheng W
(2013) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 22: 1297-303
MeSH Terms: Adult, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Breast Neoplasms, China, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10, Female, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Humans, Japan, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Recently, 41 new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer risk were identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) conducted in European descendants. Most of these risk variants have not been directly replicated in Asian populations.
METHODS - We evaluated nine of those nonreplication loci in East Asians to identify new risk variants for breast cancer in these regions. First, we analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these regions using data from two GWAS conducted among Chinese and Korean women, including 5,083 cases and 4,376 controls (stage 1). In each region, we selected an SNP showing the strongest association with breast cancer risk for replication in an independent set of 7,294 cases and 9,404 controls of East Asian descents (stage 2). Logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as a measure of the association of breast cancer risk and genetic variants.
RESULTS - Two SNPs were replicated in stage 2 at P < 0.05: rs1419026 at 6q14 [per allele OR, 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.12; P = 3.0 × 10(-4)] and rs941827 at 10q25 (OR, 0.92, 95% CI, 0.89-0.96; P = 5.3 × 10(-5)). The association with rs941827 remained highly statistically significant after adjusting for the risk variant identified initially in women of European ancestry (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82-0.97; P = 5.3 × 10(-5)).
CONCLUSION - We identified a new breast cancer risk variant at 10q25 in East Asian women.
IMPACT - Results from this study improve the understanding of the genetic basis for breast cancer.
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16 MeSH Terms
Common genetic determinants of breast-cancer risk in East Asian women: a collaborative study of 23 637 breast cancer cases and 25 579 controls.
Zheng W, Zhang B, Cai Q, Sung H, Michailidou K, Shi J, Choi JY, Long J, Dennis J, Humphreys MK, Wang Q, Lu W, Gao YT, Li C, Cai H, Park SK, Yoo KY, Noh DY, Han W, Dunning AM, Benitez J, Vincent D, Bacot F, Tessier D, Kim SW, Lee MH, Lee JW, Lee JY, Xiang YB, Zheng Y, Wang W, Ji BT, Matsuo K, Ito H, Iwata H, Tanaka H, Wu AH, Tseng CC, Van Den Berg D, Stram DO, Teo SH, Yip CH, Kang IN, Wong TY, Shen CY, Yu JC, Huang CS, Hou MF, Hartman M, Miao H, Lee SC, Putti TC, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Stewart-Brown S, Siriwanarangsan P, Sangrajrang S, Shen H, Chen K, Wu PE, Ren Z, Haiman CA, Sueta A, Kim MK, Khoo US, Iwasaki M, Pharoah PD, Wen W, Hall P, Shu XO, Easton DF, Kang D
(2013) Hum Mol Genet 22: 2539-50
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, China, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Receptors, Estrogen, Republic of Korea
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
In a consortium including 23 637 breast cancer patients and 25 579 controls of East Asian ancestry, we investigated 70 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 67 independent breast cancer susceptibility loci recently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted primarily in European-ancestry populations. SNPs in 31 loci showed an association with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in a direction consistent with that reported previously. Twenty-one of them remained statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons with the Bonferroni-corrected significance level of <0.0015. Eight of the 70 SNPs showed a significantly different association with breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status at P < 0.05. With the exception of rs2046210 at 6q25.1, the seven other SNPs showed a stronger association with ER-positive than ER-negative cancer. This study replicated all five genetic risk variants initially identified in Asians and provided evidence for associations of breast cancer risk in the East Asian population with nearly half of the genetic risk variants initially reported in GWASs conducted in European descendants. Taken together, these common genetic risk variants explain ~10% of excess familial risk of breast cancer in Asian populations.
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14 MeSH Terms