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OxyR Regulates the Transcriptional Response to Hydrogen Peroxide.
Juttukonda LJ, Green ER, Lonergan ZR, Heffern MC, Chang CJ, Skaar EP
(2019) Infect Immun 87:
MeSH Terms: Acinetobacter Infections, Acinetobacter baumannii, Animals, Anti-Infective Agents, Local, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Hydrogen Peroxide, Mice, Oxidants, Repressor Proteins, Stress, Physiological
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes diverse infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and wound infections. Due to multiple intrinsic and acquired antimicrobial-resistance mechanisms, isolates are commonly multidrug resistant, and infections are notoriously difficult to treat. The World Health Organization recently highlighted carbapenem-resistant as a "critical priority" for the development of new antimicrobials because of the risk to human health posed by this organism. Therefore, it is important to discover the mechanisms used by to survive stresses encountered during infection in order to identify new drug targets. In this study, by use of imaging, we identified hydrogen peroxide (HO) as a stressor produced in the lung during infection and defined OxyR as a transcriptional regulator of the HO stress response. Upon exposure to HO, differentially transcribes several hundred genes. However, the transcriptional upregulation of genes predicted to detoxify hydrogen peroxide is abolished in an strain in which the transcriptional regulator is genetically inactivated. Moreover, inactivation of in both antimicrobial-susceptible and multidrug-resistant strains impairs growth in the presence of HO OxyR is a direct regulator of and , which encode the major HO-degrading enzymes in , as confirmed through measurement of promoter binding by recombinant OxyR in electromobility shift assays. Finally, an mutant is less fit than wild-type during infection of the murine lung. This work reveals a mechanism used by this important human pathogen to survive HO stress encountered during infection.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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10 MeSH Terms
Fur regulation of Staphylococcus aureus heme oxygenases is required for heme homeostasis.
Lojek LJ, Farrand AJ, Weiss A, Skaar EP
(2018) Int J Med Microbiol 308: 582-589
MeSH Terms: Aerobiosis, Bacterial Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Heme, Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing), Homeostasis, Iron, Mixed Function Oxygenases, Oxygenases, Repressor Proteins, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
Heme is a cofactor that is essential for cellular respiration and for the function of many enzymes. If heme levels become too low within the cell, S. aureus switches from producing energy via respiration to producing energy by fermentation. S. aureus encodes two heme oxygenases, IsdI and IsdG, which cleave the porphyrin heme ring releasing iron for use as a nutrient source. Both isdI and isdG are only expressed under low iron conditions and are regulated by the canonical Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur). Here we demonstrate that unregulated expression of isdI and isdG within S. aureus leads to reduced growth under low iron conditions. Additionally, the constitutive expression of these enzymes leads to decreased heme abundance in S. aureus, an increase in the fermentation product lactate, and increased resistance to gentamicin. This work demonstrates that S. aureus has developed tuning mechanisms, such as Fur regulation, to ensure that the cell has sufficient quantities of heme for efficient ATP production through aerobic respiration.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Human papillomavirus 16 E6 antibodies are sensitive for human papillomavirus-driven oropharyngeal cancer and are associated with recurrence.
Lang Kuhs KA, Kreimer AR, Trivedi S, Holzinger D, Pawlita M, Pfeiffer RM, Gibson SP, Schmitt NC, Hildesheim A, Waterboer T, Ferris RL
(2017) Cancer 123: 4382-4390
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Viral, Cell Transformation, Viral, Female, Human papillomavirus 16, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Middle Aged, Oncogene Proteins, Viral, Oropharyngeal Neoplasms, Papillomavirus Infections, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Recurrence, Repressor Proteins, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2017
BACKGROUND - Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 antibodies may be an early marker of the diagnosis and recurrence of human papillomavirus-driven oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OPC).
METHODS - This study identified 161 incident oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) cases diagnosed at the University of Pittsburgh (2003-2013) with pretreatment serum. One hundred twelve had preexisting clinical HPV testing with p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridization (87 were dual-positive [HPV-OPC], and 25 were dual-negative [HPV-negative]); 62 had at least 1 posttreatment serum sample. Eighty-six of the 161 tumors were available for additional HPV16 DNA/RNA testing (45 were dual-positive [HPV16-OPC], and 19 were dual-negative [HPV16-negative). HPV16 E6 antibody testing was conducted with multiplex serology. The following were evaluated: 1) the sensitivity and specificity of HPV16 E6 serology for distinguishing HPV-OPC and HPV16-OPC from HPV-negative OPC, 2) HPV16 E6 antibody decay after treatment with linear models accommodating correlations in variance estimates, and 3) pre- and posttreatment HPV16 E6 levels and the risk of recurrence with Cox proportional hazards models.
RESULTS - Seventy-eight of 87 HPV-OPCs were HPV16 E6-seropositive (sensitivity, 89.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-95.2%), and 24 of 25 HPV-negative OPCs were HPV16 E6-seronegative (specificity, 96.0%; 95% CI, 79.6%-99.9%). Forty-two of 45 HPV16-OPCs were HPV16 E6-seropositive (sensitivity, 93.3%; 95% CI, 81.7%-98.6%), and 18 of 19 HPV16-negative OPCs were HPV16 E6-seronegative (specificity, 94.7%; 95% CI, 74.0%-99.9%). Posttreatment HPV16 E6 antibody levels did not decrease significantly from the baseline (P = .575; median follow-up, 307 days) and were not associated with the risk of recurrence. However, pretreatment HPV16 E6 seropositivity was associated with an 86% reduced risk of local/regional recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.03-0.68; P = .015).
CONCLUSIONS - HPV16 E6 antibodies may have potential clinical utility for the diagnosis and/or prognosis of HPV-OPC. Cancer 2017;123:4382-90. © 2017 American Cancer Society.
© 2017 American Cancer Society.
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Kinetics of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Antibody Response Prior to Oropharyngeal Cancer.
Kreimer AR, Johansson M, Yanik EL, Katki HA, Check DP, Lang Kuhs KA, Willhauck-Fleckenstein M, Holzinger D, Hildesheim A, Pfeiffer R, Williams C, Freedman ND, Huang WY, Purdue MP, Michel A, Pawlita M, Brennan P, Waterboer T
(2017) J Natl Cancer Inst 109:
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antibodies, Viral, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Female, Human papillomavirus 16, Humans, Incidence, Kinetics, Male, Middle Aged, Oncogene Proteins, Viral, Oropharyngeal Neoplasms, Papillomavirus Infections, Repressor Proteins, Risk Factors, Sensitivity and Specificity, United States
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2017
Background - In a European cohort, it was previously reported that 35% of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients were human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV16) seropositive up to 10 years before diagnosis vs 0.6% of cancer-free controls. Here, we describe the kinetics of HPV16-E6 antibodies prior to OPC diagnosis.
Methods - We used annual serial prediagnostic blood samples from the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. Antibodies to HPV were initially assessed in prediagnostic blood drawn at study enrollment from 198 incident head and neck cancer patients (median years to cancer diagnosis = 6.6) and 924 matched control subjects using multiplex serology, and subsequently in serial samples (median = 5/individual). Available tumor samples were identified and tested for HPV16 RNA to define HPV-driven OPC.
Results - HPV16-E6 antibodies were present at baseline in 42.3% of 52 OPC patients and 0.5% of 924 control subjects. HPV16-E6 antibody levels were highly elevated and stable across serial blood samples for 21 OPC patients who were seropositive at baseline, as well as for one OPC patient who seroconverted closer to diagnosis. All five subjects with HPV16-driven OPC tumors were HPV16-E6-seropositive, and the four subjects with HPV16-negative OPC tumors were seronegative. The estimated 10-year cumulative risk of OPC was 6.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.8% to 21.5%) for HPV16-E6-seropositive men, 1.3% (95% CI = 0.1% to 15.3%) for HPV16-E6-seropositive women, and 0.04% (95% CI = 0.03% to 0.06%) among HPV16-E6-seronegative individuals.
Conclusions - Forty-two percent of subjects diagnosed with OPC between 1994 and 2009 in a US cohort were HPV16-E6 seropositive, with stable antibody levels during annual follow-up for up to 13 years prior to diagnosis. Tumor analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of HPV16-E6 antibodies were exceptionally high in predicting HPV-driven OPC.
Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
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19 MeSH Terms
Myeloid translocation genes differentially regulate colorectal cancer programs.
Parang B, Bradley AM, Mittal MK, Short SP, Thompson JJ, Barrett CW, Naik RD, Bilotta AJ, Washington MK, Revetta FL, Smith JJ, Chen X, Wilson KT, Hiebert SW, Williams CS
(2016) Oncogene 35: 6341-6349
MeSH Terms: Animals, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nuclear Proteins, Repressor Proteins, Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors, Translocation, Genetic, Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2016
Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs), originally identified as chromosomal translocations in acute myelogenous leukemia, are transcriptional corepressors that regulate hematopoietic stem cell programs. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database revealed that MTGs were mutated in epithelial malignancy and suggested that loss of function might promote tumorigenesis. Genetic deletion of MTGR1 and MTG16 in the mouse has revealed unexpected and unique roles within the intestinal epithelium. Mtgr1 mice have progressive depletion of all intestinal secretory cells, and Mtg16 mice have a decrease in goblet cells. Furthermore, both Mtgr1 and Mtg16 mice have increased intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. We thus hypothesized that loss of MTGR1 or MTG16 would modify Apc-dependent intestinal tumorigenesis. Mtgr1 mice, but not Mtg16 mice, had a 10-fold increase in tumor multiplicity. This was associated with more advanced dysplasia, including progression to invasive adenocarcinoma, and augmented intratumoral proliferation. Analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data sets for MTGR1 and MTG16 targets indicated that MTGR1 can regulate Wnt and Notch signaling. In support of this, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis revealed that both Wnt and Notch signaling pathways were hyperactive in Mtgr1 tumors. Furthermore, in human colorectal cancer (CRC) samples MTGR1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein level. Overall our data indicates that MTGR1 has a context-dependent effect on intestinal tumorigenesis.
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13 MeSH Terms
Characterization of human papillomavirus antibodies in individuals with head and neck cancer.
Lang Kuhs KA, Pawlita M, Gibson SP, Schmitt NC, Trivedi S, Argiris A, Kreimer AR, Ferris RL, Waterboer T
(2016) Cancer Epidemiol 42: 46-52
MeSH Terms: Head and Neck Neoplasms, Human papillomavirus 16, Humans, Oncogene Proteins, Viral, Papillomavirus Infections, Repressor Proteins, Seroepidemiologic Studies
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2017
BACKGROUND - Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 antibodies are a promising biomarker of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC); however, seropositivity among non-OPC cases is not well characterized.
METHODS - Pre-treatment sera from 260 (38 OPC, 222 non-OPC) incident head and neck cancers diagnosed at the University of Pittsburgh between 2003 and 2006 were tested for HPV16 (L1,E1,E2,E4,E6,E7) and non-HPV16 E6 (HPV6,11,18,33) antibodies. Sensitivity and specificity of HPV16 E6 antibodies for HPV-driven tumors was evaluated among tumors with known HPV status (n=25).
RESULTS - 63.2% of OPC versus 27.5% of non-OPC cases were HPV16 seropositive; HPV16 E6 seroprevalence was 60.5% and 6.3% respectively, odds ratio 22.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8-53.1). Sensitivity and specificity of HPV16 E6 antibodies for HPV-driven OPC was 100% [95% CI: 50-100%; n=6] and 100% [95% CI: 60-100%, n=4] compared to 0% (n=2) and 0% (n=13) for non-OPC cases.
CONCLUSIONS - HPV16 antibodies were significantly more common in OPC versus non-OPC cases, particularly HPV16 E6 antibodies.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Development of thieno- and benzopyrimidinone inhibitors of the Hedgehog signaling pathway reveals PDE4-dependent and PDE4-independent mechanisms of action.
Hempel JE, Cadar AG, Hong CC
(2016) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 26: 1947-53
MeSH Terms: Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, HEK293 Cells, Hedgehog Proteins, Humans, Molecular Structure, Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors, Pyrimidinones, Repressor Proteins, Signal Transduction, Smoothened Receptor, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2016
From a high content in vivo screen for modulators of developmental patterning in embryonic zebrafish, we previously identified eggmanone (EGM1, 3) as a Hedgehog (Hh) signaling inhibitor functioning downstream of Smoothened. Phenotypic optimization studies for in vitro probe development utilizing a Gli transcription-linked stable luciferase reporter cell line identified EGM1 analogs with improved potency and aqueous solubility. Mechanistic profiling of optimized analogs indicated two distinct scaffold clusters: PDE4 inhibitors able to inhibit downstream of Sufu, and PDE4-independent Hh inhibitors functioning between Smo and Sufu. Each class represents valuable in vitro probes for elucidating the complex mechanisms of Hh regulation.
Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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12 MeSH Terms
Inactivating the permanent neonatal diabetes gene Mnx1 switches insulin-producing β-cells to a δ-like fate and reveals a facultative proliferative capacity in aged β-cells.
Pan FC, Brissova M, Powers AC, Pfaff S, Wright CV
(2015) Development 142: 3637-48
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Transdifferentiation, Cellular Senescence, Diabetes Mellitus, Eye Proteins, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Hyperplasia, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, PAX6 Transcription Factor, Paired Box Transcription Factors, Repressor Proteins, Somatostatin-Secreting Cells, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 28, 2015
Homozygous Mnx1 mutation causes permanent neonatal diabetes in humans, but via unknown mechanisms. Our systematic and longitudinal analysis of Mnx1 function during murine pancreas organogenesis and into the adult uncovered novel stage-specific roles for Mnx1 in endocrine lineage allocation and β-cell fate maintenance. Inactivation in the endocrine-progenitor stage shows that Mnx1 promotes β-cell while suppressing δ-cell differentiation programs, and is crucial for postnatal β-cell fate maintenance. Inactivating Mnx1 in embryonic β-cells (Mnx1(Δbeta)) caused β-to-δ-like cell transdifferentiation, which was delayed until postnatal stages. In the latter context, β-cells escaping Mnx1 inactivation unexpectedly upregulated Mnx1 expression and underwent an age-independent persistent proliferation. Escaper β-cells restored, but then eventually surpassed, the normal pancreatic β-cell mass, leading to islet hyperplasia in aged mice. In vitro analysis of islets isolated from Mnx1(Δbeta) mice showed higher insulin secretory activity and greater insulin mRNA content than in wild-type islets. Mnx1(Δbeta) mice also showed a much faster return to euglycemia after β-cell ablation, suggesting that the new β-cells derived from the escaper population are functional. Our findings identify Mnx1 as an important factor in β-cell differentiation and proliferation, with the potential for targeting to increase the number of endogenous β-cells for diabetes therapy.
© 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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15 MeSH Terms
Insm1 controls the differentiation of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells by repressing Hes1.
Jia S, Wildner H, Birchmeier C
(2015) Dev Biol 408: 90-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Differentiation, Cell Transdifferentiation, DNA-Binding Proteins, Homeodomain Proteins, Lung, Mice, Mutant Strains, Mutation, Neuroendocrine Cells, Protein Binding, Repressor Proteins, Transcription Factor HES-1, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2016
Epithelial progenitor cells of the lung generate all cell types of the mature airway epithelium, among them the neuroendocrine cells. The balance between formation of pulmonary neuroendocrine and non-neuroendocrine cells is controlled by Notch signaling. The Notch target gene Hes1 is expressed by non-neuroendocrine and absent in neuroendocrine cells. The transcription factor Ascl1 is expressed in a complementary pattern and provides key regulatory information that specifies the neuroendocrine cell fate. The molecular events that occur after the induction of the neuroendocrine differentiation program have received little attention. Here we show that Insm1 is expressed in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, and that Insm1 expression is not initiated in the lung of Ascl1 mutant mice. We use mouse genetics to show that pulmonary neuroendocrine cells depend on Insm1 for their differentiation. Mutation of Insm1 blocks terminal differentiation, upregulates Hes1 protein in neuroendocrine cells and interferes with maintenance of Ascl1 expression. We show that Insm1 binds to the Hes1 promoter and represses Hes1, and we propose that the Insm1-dependent Hes1 repression is required for neuroendocrine development. Our work demonstrates that Insm1 is a key factor regulating differentiation of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells.
Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori adaptation in vivo in response to a high-salt diet.
Loh JT, Gaddy JA, Algood HM, Gaudieri S, Mallal S, Cover TL
(2015) Infect Immun 83: 4871-83
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Base Sequence, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Genome, Bacterial, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Iron, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Oxidative Stress, Proteome, Repressor Proteins, Sodium Chloride, Dietary
Show Abstract · Added October 8, 2015
Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment.
Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms