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Health Outcome Priorities of Older Adults with Advanced CKD and Concordance with Their Nephrology Providers' Perceptions.
Ramer SJ, McCall NN, Robinson-Cohen C, Siew ED, Salat H, Bian A, Stewart TG, El-Sourady MH, Karlekar M, Lipworth L, Ikizler TA, Abdel-Kader K
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 2870-2878
MeSH Terms: Advance Care Planning, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nephrologists, Patient Preference, Patient Satisfaction, Professional-Patient Relations, Quality of Life, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
BACKGROUND - Older adults with advanced CKD have significant pain, other symptoms, and disability. To help ensure that care is consistent with patients' values, nephrology providers should understand their patients' priorities when they make clinical recommendations.
METHODS - Patients aged ≥60 years with advanced (stage 4 or 5) non-dialysis-dependent CKD receiving care at a CKD clinic completed a validated health outcome prioritization tool to ascertain their health outcome priorities. For each patient, the nephrology provider completed the same health outcome prioritization tool. Patients also answered questions to self-rate their health and completed an end-of-life scenarios instrument. We examined the associations between priorities and self-reported health status and between priorities and acceptance of common end-of-life scenarios, and also measured concordance between patients' priorities and providers' perceptions of priorities.
RESULTS - Among 271 patients (median age 71 years), the top health outcome priority was maintaining independence (49%), followed by staying alive (35%), reducing pain (9%), and reducing other symptoms (6%). Nearly half of patients ranked staying alive as their third or fourth priority. There was no relationship between patients' self-rated health status and top priority, but acceptance of some end-of-life scenarios differed significantly between groups with different top priorities. Providers' perceptions about patients' top health outcome priorities were correct only 35% of the time. Patient-provider concordance for any individual health outcome ranking was similarly poor.
CONCLUSIONS - Nearly half of older adults with advanced CKD ranked maintaining independence as their top heath outcome priority. Almost as many ranked being alive as their last or second-to-last priority. Nephrology providers demonstrated limited knowledge of their patients' priorities.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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13 MeSH Terms
Alteration of HDL Protein Composition with Hemodialysis Initiation.
Wang K, Zelnick LR, Hoofnagle AN, Vaisar T, Henderson CM, Imrey PB, Robinson-Cohen C, de Boer IH, Shiu YT, Himmelfarb J, Beck GJ, Kestenbaum B, HFM Study
(2018) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 13: 1225-1233
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Lipoproteins, HDL, Male, Middle Aged, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - HDL particles obtained from patients on chronic hemodialysis exhibit lower cholesterol efflux capacity and are enriched in inflammatory proteins compared with those in healthy individuals. Observed alterations in HDL proteins could be due to effects of CKD, but also may be influenced by the hemodialysis procedure, which stimulates proinflammatory and prothrombotic pathways.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - We compared HDL-associated proteins in 143 participants who initiated hemodialysis within the previous year with those of 110 participants with advanced CKD from the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Study. We quantified concentrations of 38 HDL-associated proteins relative to total HDL protein using targeted mass spectrometry assays that included a stable isotope-labeled internal standard. We used linear regression to compare the relative abundances of HDL-associated proteins after adjustment and required a false discovery rate value ≤10% to control for multiple testing. We further assessed the association between hemodialysis initiation and cholesterol efflux capacity in a subset of 80 participants.
RESULTS - After adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and other clinical characteristics, eight HDL-associated proteins met the prespecified false discovery threshold for association. Recent hemodialysis initiation was associated with higher HDL-associated concentrations of serum amyloid A1, A2, and A4; hemoglobin-; haptoglobin-related protein; cholesterylester transfer protein; phospholipid transfer protein; and apo E. The trend for participants recently initiating hemodialysis for lower cholesterol efflux capacity compared with individuals with advanced CKD did not reach statistical significance.
CONCLUSIONS - Compared with advanced CKD, hemodialysis initiation within the previous year is associated with higher concentrations of eight HDL proteins related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Identified associations differ from those recently observed for nondialysis-requiring CKD. Hemodialysis initiation may further impair cholesterol efflux capacity. Further work is needed to clarify the clinical significance of the identified proteins with respect to cardiovascular risk.
PODCAST - This article contains a podcast at https://www.asn-online.org/media/podcast/CJASN/2018_07_25_CJASNPodcast_18_8_W.mp3.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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7 MeSH Terms
Insulin resistance is a significant determinant of sarcopenia in advanced kidney disease.
Deger SM, Hewlett JR, Gamboa J, Ellis CD, Hung AM, Siew ED, Mamnungu C, Sha F, Bian A, Stewart TG, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2018) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 315: E1108-E1120
MeSH Terms: Adult, Body Composition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Sarcopenia
Show Abstract · Added September 24, 2018
Maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients display significant nutritional abnormalities. Insulin is an anabolic hormone with direct effects on skeletal muscle (SM). We examined the anabolic actions of insulin, whole-body (WB), and SM protein turnover in 33 MHD patients and 17 participants without kidney disease using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic (dual) clamp. Gluteal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the dual clamp. At baseline, WB protein synthesis and breakdown rates were similar in MHD patients. During dual clamp, controls had a higher increase in WB protein synthesis and a higher suppression of WB protein breakdown compared with MHD patients, resulting in statistically significantly more positive WB protein net balance [2.02 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.79 and 2.36) vs. 1.68 (IQR: 1.46 and 1.91) mg·kg fat-free mass·min for controls vs. for MHD patients, respectively, P < 0.001]. At baseline, SM protein synthesis and breakdown rates were higher in MHD patients versus controls, but SM net protein balance was similar between groups. During dual clamp, SM protein synthesis increased statistically significantly more in controls compared with MHD patients ( P = 0.03), whereas SM protein breakdown decreased comparably between groups. SM net protein balance was statistically significantly more positive in controls compared with MHD patients [67.3 (IQR: 46.4 and 97.1) vs. 15.4 (IQR: -83.7 and 64.7) μg·100 ml·min for controls and MHD patients, respectively, P = 0.03]. Human SM biopsy showed a positive correlation between glucose and leucine disposal rates, phosphorylated AKT to AKT ratio, and muscle mitochondrial markers in controls but not in MHD patients. Diminished response to anabolic actions of insulin in the stimulated setting could lead to muscle wasting in MHD patients.
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16 MeSH Terms
Serum metabolites are associated with all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease.
Hu JR, Coresh J, Inker LA, Levey AS, Zheng Z, Rebholz CM, Tin A, Appel LJ, Chen J, Sarnak MJ, Grams ME
(2018) Kidney Int 94: 381-389
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Allantoin, Biomarkers, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Fumarates, Humans, Kidney, Male, Metabolomics, Middle Aged, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2019
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) involves significant metabolic abnormalities and has a high mortality rate. Because the levels of serum metabolites in patients with CKD might provide insight into subclinical disease states and risk for future mortality, we determined which serum metabolites reproducibly associate with mortality in CKD using a discovery and replication design. Metabolite levels were quantified via untargeted liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy from serum samples of 299 patients with CKD in the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study as a discovery cohort. Six among 622 metabolites were significantly associated with mortality over a median follow-up of 17 years after adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, including urine protein and measured glomerular filtration rate. We then replicated associations with mortality in 963 patients with CKD from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) cohort over a median follow-up of ten years. Three of the six metabolites identified in the MDRD cohort replicated in the AASK cohort: fumarate, allantoin, and ribonate, belonging to energy, nucleotide, and carbohydrate pathways, respectively. Point estimates were similar in both studies and in meta-analysis (adjusted hazard ratios 1.63, 1.59, and 1.61, respectively, per doubling of the metabolite). Thus, selected serum metabolites were reproducibly associated with long-term mortality in CKD beyond markers of kidney function in two well characterized cohorts, providing targets for investigation.
Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
GDF-15, Galectin 3, Soluble ST2, and Risk of Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in CKD.
Tuegel C, Katz R, Alam M, Bhat Z, Bellovich K, de Boer I, Brosius F, Gadegbeku C, Gipson D, Hawkins J, Himmelfarb J, Ju W, Kestenbaum B, Kretzler M, Robinson-Cohen C, Steigerwalt S, Bansal N
(2018) Am J Kidney Dis 72: 519-528
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Biomarkers, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Female, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor 15, Humans, Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Sex Factors, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE - Inflammation, cardiac remodeling, and fibrosis may explain in part the excess risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), galectin 3 (Gal-3), and soluble ST2 (sST2) are possible biomarkers of these pathways in patients with CKD.
STUDY DESIGN - Observational cohort study.
SETTING & PARTICIPANTS - Individuals with CKD enrolled in either of 2 multicenter CKD cohort studies: the Seattle Kidney Study or C-PROBE (Clinical Phenotyping and Resource Biobank Study).
EXPOSURES - Circulating GDF-15, Gal-3, and sST2 measured at baseline.
OUTCOMES - Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization for physician-adjudicated heart failure and the atherosclerotic CVD events of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident.
ANALYTIC APPROACH - Cox proportional hazards models used to test the association of each biomarker with each outcome, adjusting for demographics, CVD risk factors, and kidney function.
RESULTS - Among 883 participants, mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 49±19mL/min/1.73m. Higher GDF-15 (adjusted HR [aHR] per 1-SD higher, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.53-2.29), Gal-3 (aHR per 1-SD higher, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.36-1.78), and sST2 (aHR per 1-SD higher, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.17-1.58) concentrations were significantly associated with mortality. Only GDF-15 level was also associated with heart failure events (HR per 1-SD higher, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.12-2.16). There were no detectable associations between GDF-15, Gal-3, or sST2 concentrations and atherosclerotic CVD events.
LIMITATIONS - Event rates for heart failure and atherosclerotic CVD were low.
CONCLUSIONS - Adults with CKD and higher circulating GDF-15, Gal-3, and sST2 concentrations experienced greater mortality. Elevated GDF-15 concentration was also associated with an increased rate of heart failure. Further work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms linking these circulating biomarkers with CVD in patients with CKD.
Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
Effects of vadadustat on hemoglobin concentrations in patients receiving hemodialysis previously treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.
Haase VH, Chertow GM, Block GA, Pergola PE, deGoma EM, Khawaja Z, Sharma A, Maroni BJ, McCullough PA
(2019) Nephrol Dial Transplant 34: 90-99
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anemia, Erythropoiesis, Female, Glycine, Hematinics, Hemoglobins, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Picolinic Acids, Prognosis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
Background - Vadadustat, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain dioxygenases, is an oral investigational agent in development for the treatment of anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease.
Methods - In this open-label Phase 2 trial, vadadustat was evaluated in 94 subjects receiving hemodialysis, previously maintained on epoetin alfa. Subjects were sequentially assigned to one of three vadadustat dose cohorts by starting dose: 300 mg once daily (QD), 450 mg QD or 450 mg thrice weekly (TIW). The primary endpoint was mean hemoglobin (Hb) change from pre-baseline average to midtrial (Weeks 7-8) and end-of-trial (Weeks 15-16) and was analyzed using available data (no imputation).
Results - Overall, 80, 73 and 68% of subjects in the 300 mg QD, 450 mg QD, and 450 mg TIW dose cohorts respectively, completed the study. For all dose cohorts no statistically significant mean change in Hb from pre-baseline average was observed, and mean Hb concentrations-analyzed using available data-remained stable at mid- and end-of-trial. There was one subject with an Hb excursion >13 g/dL. Overall, 83% of subjects experienced an adverse event (AE); the proportion of subjects who experienced at least one AE was similar among the three dose cohorts. The most frequently reported AEs were nausea (11.7%), diarrhea (10.6%) and vomiting (9.6%). No deaths occurred during the study. No serious AEs were attributed to vadadustat.
Conclusions - Vadadustat maintained mean Hb concentrations in subjects on hemodialysis previously receiving epoetin. These data support further investigation of vadadustat to assess its long-term safety and efficacy in subjects on hemodialysis.
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17 MeSH Terms
Renal fibrosis: Primacy of the proximal tubule.
Gewin LS
(2018) Matrix Biol 68-69: 248-262
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Progression, Extracellular Matrix, Fibrosis, Humans, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Macrophages, Myofibroblasts, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is the hallmark of chronic kidney disease and best predictor of renal survival. Many different cell types contribute to TIF progression including tubular epithelial cells, myofibroblasts, endothelia, and inflammatory cells. Previously, most of the attention has centered on myofibroblasts given their central importance in extracellular matrix production. However, emerging data focuses on how the response of the proximal tubule, a specialized epithelial segment vulnerable to injury, plays a central role in TIF progression. Several proximal tubular responses such as de-differentiation, cell cycle changes, autophagy, and metabolic changes may be adaptive initially, but can lead to maladaptive responses that promote TIF both through autocrine and paracrine effects. This review discusses the current paradigm of TIF progression and the increasingly important role of the proximal tubule in promoting TIF both in tubulointerstitial and glomerular injuries. A better understanding and appreciation of the role of the proximal tubule in TIF has important implications for therapeutic strategies to halt chronic kidney disease progression.
Copyright © 2018 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Chronic kidney disease alters lipid trafficking and inflammatory responses in macrophages: effects of liver X receptor agonism.
Kaseda R, Tsuchida Y, Yang HC, Yancey PG, Zhong J, Tao H, Bian A, Fogo AB, Linton MRF, Fazio S, Ikizler TA, Kon V
(2018) BMC Nephrol 19: 17
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biological Transport, Female, Humans, Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated, Inflammation Mediators, Lipoproteins, HDL, Lipoproteins, LDL, Liver X Receptors, Macrophages, Male, Middle Aged, Protein Transport, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Sulfonamides, THP-1 Cells
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - Our aim was to evaluate lipid trafficking and inflammatory response of macrophages exposed to lipoproteins from subjects with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to investigate the potential benefits of activating cellular cholesterol transporters via liver X receptor (LXR) agonism.
METHODS - LDL and HDL were isolated by sequential density gradient ultracentrifugation of plasma from patients with stage 3-4 CKD and individuals without kidney disease (HDL and HDL, respectively). Uptake of LDL, cholesterol efflux to HDL, and cellular inflammatory responses were assessed in human THP-1 cells. HDL effects on inflammatory markers (MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-1β), Toll-like receptors-2 (TLR-2) and - 4 (TLR-4), ATP-binding cassette class A transporter (ABCA1), NF-κB, extracellular signal regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) were assessed by RT-PCR and western blot before and after in vitro treatment with an LXR agonist.
RESULTS - There was no difference in macrophage uptake of LDL isolated from CKD versus controls. By contrast, HD was significantly less effective than HDL in accepting cholesterol from cholesterol-enriched macrophages (median 20.8% [IQR 16.1-23.7] vs control (26.5% [IQR 19.6-28.5]; p = 0.008). LXR agonist upregulated ABCA1 expression and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL of both normal and CKD subjects, although the latter continued to show lower efflux capacity. HDL increased macrophage cytokine response (TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-1β, and NF-κB) versus HDL. The heightened cytokine response to HDL was further amplified in cells treated with LXR agonist. The LXR-augmentation of inflammation was associated with increased TLR-2 and TLR-4 and ERK1/2.
CONCLUSIONS - Moderate to severe impairment in kidney function promotes foam cell formation that reflects impairment in cholesterol acceptor function of HDL. Activation of cellular cholesterol transporters by LXR agonism improves but does not normalize efflux to HDL. However, LXR agonism actually increases the pro-inflammatory effects of HDL through activation of TLRs and ERK1/2 pathways.
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17 MeSH Terms
Systemic inflammation is associated with exaggerated skeletal muscle protein catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients.
Deger SM, Hung AM, Gamboa JL, Siew ED, Ellis CD, Booker C, Sha F, Li H, Bian A, Stewart TG, Zent R, Mitch WE, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2017) JCI Insight 2:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Integrin beta1, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Proteins, Muscle, Skeletal, Regression Analysis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases, Tripartite Motif Proteins, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Systemic inflammation and muscle wasting are highly prevalent and coexist in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). We aimed to determine the effects of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle protein metabolism in MHD patients.
METHODS - Whole body and skeletal muscle protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope kinetic studies. We incorporated expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue from integrin β1 gene KO CKD mice models.
RESULTS - Among 129 patients with mean (± SD) age 47 ± 12 years, 74% were African American, 73% were male, and 22% had diabetes mellitus. Median high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration was 13 (interquartile range 0.8, 33) mg/l. There were statistically significant associations between hs-CRP and forearm skeletal muscle protein synthesis, degradation, and net forearm skeletal muscle protein balance (P < 0.001 for all). The associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for clinical and demographic confounders, as well as in sensitivity analysis, excluding patients with diabetes mellitus. In attempting to identify potential mechanisms involved in this correlation, we show increased expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from an animal model of chronic kidney disease.
CONCLUSION - These data suggest that systemic inflammation is a strong and independent determinant of skeletal muscle protein homeostasis in MHD patients, providing rationale for further studies using anticytokine therapies in patients with underlying systemic inflammation.
FUNDING - This study was in part supported by NIH grants R01 DK45604 and 1K24 DK62849, the Clinical Translational Science Award UL1-TR000445 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the Veterans Administration Merit Award I01 CX000414, the SatelliteHealth Normon Coplon Extramural Grant Program, and the FDA grant 000943.
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25 MeSH Terms
Acute Kidney Injury and Risk of Incident Heart Failure Among US Veterans.
Bansal N, Matheny ME, Greevy RA, Eden SK, Perkins AM, Parr SK, Fly J, Abdel-Kader K, Himmelfarb J, Hung AM, Speroff T, Ikizler TA, Siew ED
(2018) Am J Kidney Dis 71: 236-245
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Creatinine, Disease Progression, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Kidney, Male, Middle Aged, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States, Veterans
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
BACKGROUND - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and associated with poor outcomes. Heart failure is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease among patients with chronic kidney disease. The relationship between AKI and heart failure remains unknown and may identify a novel mechanistic link between kidney and cardiovascular disease.
STUDY DESIGN - Observational study.
SETTING & PARTICIPANTS - We studied a national cohort of 300,868 hospitalized US veterans (2004-2011) without a history of heart failure.
PREDICTOR - AKI was the predictor and was defined as a 0.3-mg/dL or 50% increase in serum creatinine concentration from baseline to the peak hospital value. Patients with and without AKI were matched (1:1) on 28 in- and outpatient covariates using optimal Mahalanobis distance matching.
OUTCOMES - Incident heart failure was defined as 1 or more hospitalization or 2 or more outpatient visits with a diagnosis of heart failure within 2 years through 2013.
RESULTS - There were 150,434 matched pairs in the study. Patients with and without AKI during the index hospitalization were well matched, with a median preadmission estimated glomerular filtration rate of 69mL/min/1.73m. The overall incidence rate of heart failure was 27.8 (95% CI, 19.3-39.9) per 1,000 person-years. The incidence rate was higher in those with compared with those without AKI: 30.8 (95% CI, 21.8-43.5) and 24.9 (95% CI, 16.9-36.5) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, AKI was associated with 23% increased risk for incident heart failure (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.19-1.27).
LIMITATIONS - Study population was primarily men, reflecting patients seen at Veterans Affairs hospitals.
CONCLUSIONS - AKI is an independent risk factor for incident heart failure. Future studies to identify underlying mechanisms and modifiable risk factors are needed.
Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms