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BIO 300, a Nanosuspension of Genistein, Mitigates Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction and Sensitizes Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts to Radiation Therapy.
Jackson IL, Pavlovic R, Alexander AA, Connors CQ, Newman D, Mahmood J, Eley J, Harvey AJ, Kaytor MD, Vujaskovic Z
(2019) Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 105: 400-409
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Pressure, Disease Models, Animal, Drugs, Investigational, Erectile Dysfunction, Fibrosis, Genistein, Male, Mice, Mice, Nude, Nanoparticles, Penile Erection, Penis, Prostate, Radiation Injuries, Experimental, Radiation-Protective Agents, Random Allocation, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Regional Blood Flow, Suspensions, Transplantation, Heterologous
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
PURPOSE - To assess whether BIO 300, a synthetic genistein nanosuspension, improves the therapeutic index in prostate cancer treatment by preventing radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) without reducing tumor radiosensitivity.
METHODS AND MATERIALS - Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 25 Gy of 220-kV prostate-confined x-rays. Animals were randomized to receive sham radiation therapy (RT), RT alone, RT with daily BIO 300 at 2 experimental dosing regimens, or RT with daily genistein. Erectile response was evaluated over time. Penile shaft tissue was harvested for histologic analyses. Murine xenograft studies using prostate cancer cell lines determined the effects of BIO 300 dosing on RT efficacy.
RESULTS - Prostate-confined RT significantly decreased apomorphine-induced erectile response (P < .05 vs sham RT). Erection frequency in animals receiving prophylactic treatment with BIO 300 starting 3 days before RT was similar to sham controls after RT. Treatment with synthetic genistein did not mitigate loss in erectile frequency. At week 14, post-RT treatment with BIO 300 resulted in significantly higher quality of erectile function compared with both the RT arm and the RT arm receiving genistein starting 3 days before irradiation (P < .05). In hormone-sensitive and insensitive prostate tumor-bearing mice, BIO 300 administration did not negatively affect radiation-induced tumor growth delay.
CONCLUSIONS - BIO 300 prevents radiation-induced ED, measured by erection frequency, erectile function, and erection quality, when administered 3 days before RT and continued daily for up to 14 weeks. Data also suggest that BIO 300 administered starting 2 hours after RT mitigates radiation-induced ED. Data provide strong nonclinical evidence to support clinical translation of BIO 300 for mitigation of ED while maintaining treatment response to RT.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Lipopolysaccharide-induced maternal inflammation induces direct placental injury without alteration in placental blood flow and induces a secondary fetal intestinal injury that persists into adulthood.
Fricke EM, Elgin TG, Gong H, Reese J, Gibson-Corley KN, Weiss RM, Zimmerman K, Bowdler NC, Kalantera KM, Mills DA, Underwood MA, McElroy SJ
(2018) Am J Reprod Immunol 79: e12816
MeSH Terms: Amniotic Fluid, Animals, Digestive System Diseases, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Fetal Diseases, Inflammation, Interleukins, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Necrosis, Placenta, Placental Insufficiency, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Regional Blood Flow
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
PROBLEM - Premature birth complicates 10%-12% of deliveries. Infection and inflammation are the most common etiologies and are associated with increased offspring morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maternal inflammation causes direct placenta injury and subsequent injury to the fetal intestine.
METHOD OF STUDY - Pregnant C57Bl6 mice were injected intraperitoneally on day 15.5 with 100 μg/kg LPS or saline. Maternal serum, amniotic fluid, placental samples, and ileal samples of offspring were obtained assessed for inflammation and/or injury. Maternal placental ultrasounds were performed. Placental DNA was isolated for microbiome analysis.
RESULTS - Maternal injection with LPS caused elevated IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, KC-GRO, and TNF. Placental tissue showed increased IL-1β, IL-6, and KC-GRO and decreased IL-10, but no changes were observed in amniotic fluid. Placental histology demonstrated LPS-induced increases in mineralization and necrosis, but no difference in placental blood flow. Most placentas had no detectable microbiome. Exposure to maternal LPS induced significant injury to the ilea of the offspring.
CONCLUSION - Lipopolysaccharide causes a maternal inflammatory response that is mirrored in the placenta. Placental histology demonstrates structural changes; however, placental blood flow is preserved. LPS also induces an indirect intestinal injury in the offspring that lasts beyond the neonatal period.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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17 MeSH Terms
Translocation of Microspheres into the Pulmonary Artery after Bronchial Artery Injection.
Robbins IM, Johnson J, Petracek M, Lambright E, Bream P, Merantz S, Pugh ME, Hemnes AR
(2015) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 191: e28-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bronchial Arteries, Embolization, Therapeutic, Endarterectomy, Hemoptysis, Humans, Injections, Injections, Intra-Arterial, Male, Microspheres, Pulmonary Artery, Pulmonary Embolism, Regional Blood Flow, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Young Adult
Added March 8, 2020
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Tissue inflammation and nitric oxide-mediated alterations in cardiovascular function are major determinants of endotoxin-induced insulin resistance.
House LM, Morris RT, Barnes TM, Lantier L, Cyphert TJ, McGuinness OP, Otero YF
(2015) Cardiovasc Diabetol 14: 56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arterial Pressure, Cardiac Output, Chemokine CCL2, Echocardiography, Endothelium-Dependent Relaxing Factors, Gene Expression, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Heart, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Interleukin-6, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microspheres, Muscle Cells, Muscle, Skeletal, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, RNA, Messenger, Regional Blood Flow, Serpin E2, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2015
BACKGROUND - Endotoxin (i.e. LPS) administration induces a robust inflammatory response with accompanying cardiovascular dysfunction and insulin resistance. Overabundance of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to the vascular dysfunction. However, inflammation itself also induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. We sought to investigate whether the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by increased NO availability without inflammatory stress can promote insulin resistance. Additionally, we examined the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or NOS2), the source of the increase in NO availability, in modulating LPS-induced decrease in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake (MGU).
METHODS - The impact of NO donor infusion on insulin-stimulated whole-body and muscle glucose uptake (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps), and the cardiovascular system was assessed in chronically catheterized, conscious mice wild-type (WT) mice. The impact of LPS on insulin action and the cardiovascular system were assessed in WT and global iNOS knockout (KO) mice. Tissue blood flow and cardiac function were assessed using microspheres and echocardiography, respectively. Insulin signaling activity, and gene expression of pro-inflammatory markers were also measured.
RESULTS - NO donor infusion decreased mean arterial blood pressure, whole-body glucose requirements, and MGU in the absence of changes in skeletal muscle blood flow. LPS lowered mean arterial blood pressure and glucose requirements in WT mice, but not in iNOS KO mice. Lastly, despite an intact inflammatory response, iNOS KO mice were protected from LPS-mediated deficits in cardiac output. LPS impaired MGU in vivo, regardless of the presence of iNOS. However, ex vivo, insulin action in muscle obtained from LPS treated iNOS KO animals was protected.
CONCLUSION - Nitric oxide excess and LPS impairs glycemic control by diminishing MGU. LPS impairs MGU by both the direct effect of inflammation on the myocyte, as well as by the indirect NO-driven cardiovascular dysfunction.
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Vascular content, tone, integrity, and haemodynamics for guiding fluid therapy: a conceptual approach.
Chawla LS, Ince C, Chappell D, Gan TJ, Kellum JA, Mythen M, Shaw AD, ADQI XII Fluids Workgroup
(2014) Br J Anaesth 113: 748-55
MeSH Terms: Blood Vessels, Delphi Technique, Dialysis, Fluid Therapy, Hemodynamics, Humans, Microcirculation, Perfusion, Regional Blood Flow, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Despite many clinical trials and investigative efforts to determine appropriate therapeutic intervention(s) for shock, this topic remains controversial. The use of i.v. fluid has represented the cornerstone for the treatment of hypoperfusion for two centuries.
METHODS - As a part of International Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative XII Fluids Workgroup meeting, we sought to incorporate recent advances in our understanding of vascular biology into a more comprehensive yet accessible approach to the patient with hypoperfusion. In this workgroup, we attempted to develop a framework that incorporates key aspects of the vasculature into a diagnostic approach.
RESULTS - The four main components of our proposal involve the assessment of the blood flow (BF), vascular content (vC), the vascular barrier (vB), and vascular tone (vT). Any significant perturbation in any of these domains can lead to hypoperfusion at both the macro- and micro-circulatory level. We have termed the BF, vC, vB, and vT diagnostic approach the vascular component (VC) approach.
CONCLUSIONS - The VC approach to hypoperfusion has potential advantages to the current diagnostic system. This approach also has the distinct advantage that it can be used to assess the systemic, regional, and micro-vasculature, thereby harmonizing the approach to clinical vascular diagnostics across these levels. The VC approach will need to be tested prospectively to determine if this system can in fact improve outcomes in patients who suffer from hypoperfusion.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 inhibition and the vascular effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 and brain natriuretic peptide in the human forearm.
Devin JK, Pretorius M, Nian H, Yu C, Billings FT, Brown NJ
(2014) J Am Heart Assoc 3:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cross-Over Studies, Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors, Double-Blind Method, Female, Forearm, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Natriuretic Peptide, Brain, Pyrazines, Regional Blood Flow, Sitagliptin Phosphate, Triazoles, Vasodilation
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus by preventing the degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 causes vasodilation in animal models but also increases sympathetic activity; the effect of GLP-1 in the human vasculature and how it is altered by DPP4 inhibition is not known. DPP4 also degrades the vasodilator brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to a less potent metabolite. This study tested the hypothesis that DPP4 inhibition potentiates the vasodilator responses to GLP-1 and BNP in the human forearm.
METHOD AND RESULTS - Seventeen healthy subjects participated in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study. On each study day, subjects received DPP4 inhibitor (sitagliptin 200 mg by mouth) or placebo. Sitagliptin increased forearm blood flow and decreased forearm vascular resistance without affecting mean arterial pressure and pulse. GLP-1 and BNP were infused in incremental doses via brachial artery. Venous GLP-1 concentrations were significantly higher during sitagliptin use, yet there was no effect of GLP-1 on forearm blood flow in the presence or absence of sitagliptin. BNP caused dose-dependent vasodilation; however, sitagliptin did not affect this response. GLP-1 and BNP had no effect on net norepinephrine release.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that GLP-1 does not act as a direct vasodilator in humans and does not contribute to sympathetic activation. Sitagliptin does not regulate vascular function in healthy humans by affecting the degradation of GLP-1 and BNP.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL - www.clinicaltrials.gov/ Unique identifier: NCT01413542.
© 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.
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Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.
Short KW, Head WS, Piston DW
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 306: E324-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Tracking, Connexins, Erythrocytes, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Regional Blood Flow
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.
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13 MeSH Terms
A 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, sarpogrelate, reduces renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis by suppressing PAI-1.
Hamasaki Y, Doi K, Maeda-Mamiya R, Ogasawara E, Katagiri D, Tanaka T, Yamamoto T, Sugaya T, Nangaku M, Noiri E
(2013) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 305: F1796-803
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins, Fibrosis, In Vitro Techniques, Kidney Tubules, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Nephritis, Interstitial, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, Regional Blood Flow, Serotonin, Serotonin Antagonists, Succinates, Transforming Growth Factor beta1, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added February 11, 2016
A selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A receptor antagonist sarpogrelate (SG) blocks serotonin-induced platelet aggregation. It has been used clinically for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. SG might be able to improve chronic ischemia, which contributes to renal fibrosis progression by maintaining renal microcirculation. This study investigated whether SG suppresses renal fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice fed a 0.2% adenine-containing diet for 6 wk developed severe tubulointerstitial fibrosis with kidney dysfunction. Subsequent SG treatment (30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 4 wk improved these changes significantly by increasing peritubular blood flow in the fibrotic area, as evaluated by intravital microscopy and decreasing fibrin deposition. Urinary L-type fatty acid-binding protein, up-regulated by renal hypoxia, was also reduced by SG. Additionally, results showed that mRNA expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which is known to promote fibrosis by mediating and enhancing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling, was suppressed by SG treatment in the kidney. In vitro experiments using cultured murine proximal tubular epithelial (mProx) cells revealed that incubation with TGF-β1 and 5-HT increased PAI-1 mRNA expression; SG significantly reduced it. In conclusion, SG reduces renal fibrosis not only by the antithrombotic effect of maintaining peritubular blood flow but also by suppressing PAI-1 expression in renal tubular cells.
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Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease.
Poole KM, Tucker-Schwartz JM, Sit WW, Walsh AJ, Duvall CL, Skala MC
(2013) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 305: H1168-80
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arteries, Collateral Circulation, Disease Models, Animal, Femoral Artery, Hindlimb, Ligation, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Optical Imaging, Oxygen, Perfusion Imaging, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Regional Blood Flow, Tomography, Optical Coherence
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice.
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16 MeSH Terms
Early arterial stasis during resin-based yttrium-90 radioembolization: incidence and preliminary outcomes.
Piana PM, Bar V, Doyle L, Anne R, Sato T, Eschelman DJ, McCann JW, Gonsalves CF, Brown DB
(2014) HPB (Oxford) 16: 336-41
MeSH Terms: Aged, Brachytherapy, Embolization, Therapeutic, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intra-Arterial, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Microspheres, Middle Aged, Radiopharmaceuticals, Regional Blood Flow, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Yttrium Radioisotopes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVES - This study was conducted to determine the incidence of early stasis in radioembolization using resin yttrium-90 (Y-90) microspheres, to evaluate potential contributing factors, and to review initial imaging outcomes.
METHODS - Patients in whom early stasis occurred were compared with those in whom complete delivery was achieved for tumour type and vascularity, tumour : normal liver ratio (T : N ratio) at technetium-99m-macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m-MAA) angiography, previous intra-arterial therapy, and infusion site (left, right or whole liver). Tumour response was evaluated at 3 months and defined according to whether a partial response and stable disease versus progressive disease were demonstrated.
RESULTS - A total of 71 patients underwent 128 Y-90 infusions in which 26 (20.3%) stasis events occurred. Hypervascular and hypovascular tumours had similar rates of stasis (17.4% versus 27.8%; P = NS). The mean ± standard deviation T : N ratio was 3.03 ± 1.54 and 3.66 ± 2.79 in patients with and without stasis, respectively (P = NS). Stasis occurred in 14 of 81 (17.3%) and 12 of 47 (25.5%) infusions following previous intra-arterial therapy and in therapy-naïve territories, respectively (P = NS). Early stasis occurred in 15 of 41 (36.6%) left, 10 of 65 (15.4%) right and one of 22 (4.5%) whole liver infusions (P < 0.001). Rates of partial response and stable disease were similar in the stasis (88.3%) and non-stasis (76.0%) groups (P = NS).
CONCLUSIONS - Early stasis occurred in approximately 20% of infusions with similar incidences in hyper- and hypovascular tumours. Whole-liver therapy reduced the incidence of stasis. Stasis did not appear to affect initial imaging outcomes.
© 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.
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